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AMUSING ANECDOTES OF EXPLORERS

— - * A ftory «•«£• from Bletra Leone that Sir Francis de Win ton won hie decisive victory over the Youlne tribe In the Interior ai moon by the terror of the natlvei at the electrlo light m by the guns of the expedition. For signalling purposes at night, and to Illumine hli camp, Sir Fmooli had provided a number of electrlo Kghtc reieed on lofty poles. The natives s»w night tnrned Into day, and the Inexplicable I'pht took »U the fight ont of them. It is nearly always the caie that -when the white man, by some harmless expedient, knpre*ses savagee with hit puissance and superiority, he bai more than half oonqueredtfeem before he strikes • blow. For many years the fierce Pafaoaio tribe, on the middle Ogowe river, turned back •very explorer who tried to enter their country. Pierre de Brszzsa w»b the first -traveller they permitted to asoand the greet river, and he won their favor wlthoot a tingle hostile act. He Bent word to the ehlef that h» had lome presents for ~ film, and m this way got permission to enter one of the frontier toirni. The tattooed savages oonld hardly believe their eyes that night as a great crowd grouped themselves round the explorer and witnessed the wonderful show he had provided. Rockets, Roman candles, whirligigs, and maoy other wonders of the pyrotechnic art bewildered, delighted, •nd astounded them. The feats he perforated with the exploding bullet fill ad them with awe. afcd Id his repeating rifle they saw a wonderful weapon, whtoh they -were sure he conld fire off for #yer without recharging. It was this niehi'a work that opened the 1 great region of the Frenoh Oongo to Do Brazza, and made him famons as an explorer. It has been his pride thet m all his travels be never shot a native ; but, for all that, gunpowder and fireworks were the foundation of his brilliant success A good story is told of » white man who wac token prisoner by en inland tribe In the early days of the Fiji settlements. Bis captors were cannibal*, and It made him very nervous when he saw them start ■ fire under a big native oven. He made ' up his mind that it was all op with him unless he convinced the savages that be wm a very superior being. A happy thought struck him . He called for something to eat, and when food was placed before him he used his jack-knife to ont It up. Every mouthful or two he ■took the point of the jack-knife into one of his legs with snob foroe that It stood erect. It was a cork leg, and the native! looked on m astonishment and alarm as he bnrled the blade In it. After the meal he began to take his leg off. This was too much for the savages, sod they scampered for the bush as they tsw him taming hfs leg round and round. As he mounted bis horsa the natives began to gather again, but he made a motion ai if to tjnserew bis head, and the speotators fled m dismay, leaving him to find his way beck to the coast. When Joseph Thomson made his great Journey through Masalland a few years ago, he had a few tricks thet gave him a reputation as a w'zred, and helped him wonderfully on bis way. Oae trick he •lways reserved as a last resort, and many times It procured food for bis party from natives who had refused to cell him a ■Ingle fowl or a particle of manioc. He had two false teeth on a plate, and his great trick was to show the natives that ' the white man could remove his teeth. This wonderful feat usually accomplished the desired result, bnfc the Mount J£enis> Dfttlyes wanted a bigger show than he gave them, They insisted that if be eouTd remove two teeth he oonld extraot the others also, and they demsnded to see the entire lot. Expostulation was of no avail. They told him to take ont all his teeth or itarve, and he was glad to esoapp In the night from this Inhospitable trlba, On the way back to the coast Thomson was almost destitute of goods to barter for food, but bis reputation as a wlsird end a physician spread fsr and wide and by ' means of his trlok and medloines he managed to get along. Heating's Powder destroys both moth, fleae, beetles, and all other insects, while quite harmless to domestic animals. In exterminating beetles, the success of this powder is extraordinary. It is perfectly clean m application:.'"See the article you purchase is Keating*-, as imitations . are noxious and m eftijctual SoW m tiw,nis, ft, and at 60. b* w^H" •■ ■■■•■ ■ w

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18890302.2.24

Bibliographic details

AMUSING ANECDOTES OF EXPLORERS, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2077, 2 March 1889

Word Count
797

AMUSING ANECDOTES OF EXPLORERS Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2077, 2 March 1889

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