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HOW OUR RAILWAYS ARE MANAGED

Tho Messrs Smitb, of Greenfield, who aro large looal exporter! both pf atook and produce, have been repeatedly repoised by the exorbitant railway freights, and compelled to fall back on the primitive horse-team. This firm and Messrs Begg Bros arranged this season to have their wool, amoonllng to about 1000 bales, taken by road to Port Chalmers, as the port of shipment, rather than by rail, as a more economical arrangement. From Greenfield daring the past season 1J.4 trooki of ohaff were despatobed from Waltahuna railway station to Dnnedln, and out of that number six traoki ex* oeedbd the maximum weight of four tons, whlob, It seems, Is the ofßolal standard for each truck. For this overweight a fine of ■ half-rate more was Imposed; The rate per track from Waltahuna to Dooedln ti £1 8s 2d, whloh wai rigorously exaoted, though 108 tracks did not reach the official maximum weight by several hundredweight. Yet, m the other In— ] stanoe, where six trucks only exocoded the weight, the department Insisted on an exorbitant fine of 14s Id per truck, The disposition to extort exorbitant charges on every pretence, ft will be noticed, is a very strong feature of tho department. The same remark*, In their entirety, also apply to the carriage of wool. Were a private firm foolhardy enough to pursue a policy of this kind, the oonsto quenoes would be disastrous. Yet neither expostulation nor wholesale loss of trade seems to affect, In the slightest degree, the arrangements of the department. Mr Smith has repeatedly offered the railway the oarrlage of his sheep at the same rate per head as it costs him to drive them to Dunedln. The oost by road Is competed to amount to 4Jd por head — lsd being the ordinary expense, with an allowanoe of 3d per head for loss of weight This offer the railway authorities have refused to aooept, preferring to ran empty trains, while the freight the engine should be hauling if travelling leburely alongside 7 the line of railway. These are a few m > atanoei that came under our notice io the Jopil|fcy.- M Io»p«»ki Tlroe»,"

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18890211.2.27

Bibliographic details

HOW OUR RAILWAYS ARE MANAGED, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2060, 11 February 1889

Word Count
359

HOW OUR RAILWAYS ARE MANAGED Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2060, 11 February 1889

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