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NOTES.

I + The evidence now being taken before the Commission presided over by Sir James Hannen is, to say the least of it, exceedingly ugly. It has been svforn > that the "Invincibles" received enormous sums of money from the Land League besides expensive arms, that there were joint meetings of the Land League and the Fenian Organisation, that the leaders of the latter organisation included Egan, Brennan, and the mysterious " Number One," and that at the joint meetings referred to Messrs Michael Davitt, Parnell, Biggar, Dillon, Egan, and Brennan were present. It was further sworn that Fganjand Byrne supplied the Fenians with money, and that Mrs Bryne provided the knives and revolvers intended for the murder of the Castle officials.. A number of letters were identified as m the handwriting of Egan, and several of these letters " show that Mr Parnell was being consulted." This, if true, appears plainly to prove that Egan was an accessory before the fact to the murders of Sir Frederick Cavendish and Mr Burke, and Mr Parnell occupies a more than questionable position if it be true that he was m the confidence of Egan, How far that confidence went the cablegrams do not aB yet pretend to disclose, and it may be, and we hope that it may prove to be so, that Egan's consultations with Mr Parnell did not involve any knowledge of the intended outrages, and that at the joint meetings at which he (Parnell) was present no such matters were discussed. But even if this were the case, Mr Parnell's association with men who it is sworn were the associates of murderers and assassins is enough to condemn him »s a public man. But is the evidence given true? We hesitate to believe it ; and if m the case for the defence it be contradicted on the testimony of reliable witnesses, then it will fall altogether. It will at anyrate be right to suspend judgment until the other sdo has been heard, the more especially because the damning evidence to which we bare alluded comes from a -tainted source, being that of one who was himself m league with the Phoenix. Park assassins, who, by his own confession, undertook to murder Judge Lawson, and who is undergoing a sentence of ten years' penal servitude. It does not need to be said that a man capable of crime of this sort would not I stick at perjury.

America evidently does not intend to allow Germany to do exactly as she pleases m Sampa, and Bismarck will either have to stay his band or there will be trouble. It is quite plain from President Cleveland's message to Congress that the intentions and objects of Germany are well understood, and Congress is plainly told that her actions m Samon "indicate a desire to obtain a preponderance of power m that country, which is quite inconsistent with the existing agreement between the United States and the European Powers." A man-of-war, the Triton, under the flag of Admiral Kimberley, is to be sent out forthwith to the Islands as a check upon German designs, and Mr Bayard has announced that his Government will co-operate with Germany and Great Britain to restore order m Samon, but it is to be "on the basis of Samoan independence," It is asserted, and we believe porrectly (though it is some time since we read the text of the treaty, and cannot at the moment vefer to it), that (be Washington Conference of 1887 secured *to the Samoans the right to elect their own ging, and if thiß be the case then obviously it is for the Samoans themselves to decide as between Mataafa Malietoa and Tamasese with out the interference of Germany or either of the. treaty Powers. Undoubtedly Germany has been plotting to take advantage of the present disorder, which she may indeed be suspected of having helped to bring about as a plea for taking charge of the islands m the interests of German settlers, bat if Great Britain only takes up as firm an attitude as the United. States she will have to keep her hands off. Apropos to oar recent article on the suggested union of Canada with the United States the following information relative to the area and population of the Dominion, which we find m the columns of a Wellington paper will be read with interest ;-— The Dominion of Canada is composed . of seven provinces and a number of vast territorial districts, which correspond to the Territories of the United States. The provinces bear a relation to the individual States. They are unequal m size, British Columbia having 390,344 square miles of area, and little Prince Edward Island containing only 2,188 square miles. Quebec has 193,855 Bqtt&re miles, Ontario has 107,780, Nova Scotia, 21,781, New Brunswick, 27,822, and Manitoba possesses 118,961, The enormooß North-western territory, which has been subdivided into Alberta, Saskatchewan and Arthabacka, comprises 1,919,502 square miles, Keewaytin, 895,806; the Arctic Islands, SI 1,700, and the islands of Hudson's Bay, 23,400. Here is an area m the aggregate of 3,406,542 square miles of God's earth under tjje asgis of Great Britain. Polyglot is the population thinly scattered over the land. There are 1,200,000 Frenchmen, the Emerald Isle has contributed 925,000 and the Land o' Cakes has 555,000 representatives. Three hundred thousand persons trace their near descent to -Germany ; there are about seventy thousand relatives of Taffy the Welshman, and the so-called Scandinavians number about eleven thousand souls. Ontario the most thoroughly English province, has a population of 1,700,000 m round numbers ; Quebec contains 1,600,000, of whom 1,100,000 are French. "Nova Scotia contains J450,000, New Brunswick nearly 400,000, Prince Edward Island 120,000 British Columbia 120,000 and Manitoba approximately 1170,000,

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18890119.2.32

Bibliographic details

NOTES., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2041, 19 January 1889

Word Count
955

NOTES. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2041, 19 January 1889

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