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AN EXTRAORDINARY GARB

John Smith Harris, better known bb *• Tho Whiffl 3r," «as called upon In the Wellington X, Mi Court on Thursday last, says the " Evening Preaa," to answer the oharge of having had on his person the day before certain artioleß of dlpgulse, and pleaded not guilty. Mr H. W, Robinson, R,M, oocapled the bench, and the habitacß of the Court were In fnli force. Oonßtftble Gray deponed that yesterday Afternoon he observed the defendant on Limbton Quay In a most extraor Jloa-y garb. Be was dressed partly like a woman and partly like a clown, having for a headgear a small black straw bonnet, with a bnnoh of artificial flowers hanging down bis back, while In the breast of his cavalry tnnio vraj stack a fair a'z?d carrot. The m'st extraordinary part of hla dress, however, waß his trousers, which were m shape Homathing of a cross between a pair ')( drawers' and a down's pantaloons. The front and back alternatively of the legs were of fancy and bright pick oretonne, while round the bottoms were bands of red and white alternately, and below this was a band of deep lace. The exhibition o£ the artistes m Court were with roars of laughter, which lnoreaied almost to convulsions when the acoused, m contesting tha oonntable'a statement that he thought the pantaloons wei-a ladles' clothing, said " Ah, right I I'll jast prove to his Honor that they are not ladlea* garments," Then walking ap to the Bench with the troaoers m his hand, he Mid "Si.* ! ao far to I know tho ladles' garments are not made like these." This was too much for Hl* Worship, who had to join m the heatty laughter prevailing. The accuaed, after putting Constable Gray to a oevere cross-examina-tion, addressed his Worship. He said — " Your Honor J you will remember that when I came into this Court a few days ago to ask if you were going to sit on the Bench en a particular day, I wore a Fort- Admiral's coat. Well, sir, they were worn out of no disrespect for the Court, but it jo.it happened that I had them on that day. lam a travelling Advertising representative of a Birmingham tailoring firm, and a masquerade fanoy tailor, Mr Bocck, of Cuba street, »nd they supply me with these various imba. Mr Tippler, the grocer on the Quay, promised the other day to get me 4 Ohlnaman'a suit for the parposo of tea. (Tow, sir, the law is, I take It, and I know aome'hlng about it, that a man can go about m whatever garb be chooses without breaking any law as long as decency Is observed, and I did not err m that particular yesterday, and If I have broken any law lam macb surprised. His Worship then dismissed the charge, and tho Whffflor left too Court amidst general amusement.

The offioial journal of the Government of Olonetz reportß that the distriot of Welikogub is blockaded by beara. In five villages the inhabitants do not dare to venture beyond the boundaries. Although not 100 miles from St Petersburg, the distriot ia eacomoompaEsed by primeval forests, stretohing hundreds of versts m every direotion. Hero beara seem to have formed a settlement. They form groups of seven or eight, and descending into tho cultivated patoheß, attack the horses and horned cattle, reducing the peasants to despair, making them afraid to till their fields. Their terror ia so great that none of them will any longer venture into tho forest. The aid of the local authorities has been frequently invoked, m vain; and the peasants wero looking forward, bb a laßt hope, to the autumn battues of the soldiers of the distriot, who will, according to usage, organise regular bear hunts.

The final judgment and deoree of the Supreme Court of Utah m the case of the United States against the Mormon Ohuroh, ends the career of that church as a corporation, and relieves the Mormon people from their oppressive tithe BVBtem. By this deoree it is stripped of a large part of its power for harm and loses its wealth, its taxing authority, and ita personal control. Hereafter it muat ooonpy the same position as any other ohuroh, and devote itself to the promul? gatiou and teaobing of religious dootrine. All ita property, except the temple block and buildings, which must be used for purposes of worship only, is confiscated. It must raise ita moneys by voluntary contribution, and not only by oompuleory taxation! It can no longer maintain a system of polios and constabulary. It oan no longer hold courts or possess civil administrative power, nor nominate oleotions, nor dictate m seoular matters ; m shori, it has ceased to be the State Ohuroh of Utah, but is a Mormon ohuroh only. Its tempoial power has gone for ever.

" Bucha-Paiba." Quick, complete cure, all annoying kidney, bladder, and urinnary diseases. At chemists and druggists. Kempthorne, Prosssr, and Co., agents, , Christchurch. |

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18881228.2.27

Bibliographic details

AN EXTRAORDINARY GARB, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2023, 28 December 1888

Word Count
829

AN EXTRAORDINARY GARB Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2023, 28 December 1888

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