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STOLEN ANTIQUITIES

The authorities of tbe British Mu-oum, ar.d to Ips 9 degree tbe curators of tbe Sonth Kensington Museum (s3fs the -London correspondent of the "Liverpool Poet "), find themselves m a rather awkward position. Sime time Pgo the authorities of the British Mosenm purchased ft magnificent marble bust of tbe Emperor Adrian. It wbb a work of the finest antlqao art, and the prloe was execodine'y reosonabla. The authorities were rmtarally proud of their latest acquisition, and one day Invited a wollkpown gontlenun oonneoted with tbe nlplemstio world to view the treasure, The Greek, as coon as he sat eyes on the bust, recognised. in it one of. the most valuable treasures In the Royal Mv ;•••!» at Athens, He communicated with his Government, with the most astounding results. It was found that not only had the bust of Adrian been stolen from the Athens Museum, but that many other priceless treasures had disappeared, if, Trlcouple, the Grecian Premier, on' hear* Ing from the Gr« els Minister m London, gave directions foraatrlot enmlnutlotfof the national oolleofclons, not only In the Central Museum at Athens, but through* out the oountry. It was discovered that looting bid been general, and some high official personages In Athens have been bed responsible- for the , thefts, which have been carried on In the most audtcloas and systematic manner for sv considerable period of time.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18881204.2.18

Bibliographic details

STOLEN ANTIQUITIES, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2004, 4 December 1888

Word Count
229

STOLEN ANTIQUITIES Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2004, 4 December 1888

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