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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1888. UNHAPPY ROYALTY.

" Uneasy" lies the head that wears a crown," is one of the most hackneyed of quotations, but it must be an ever-pro-sent experience with their Majesties of Russia. Gf the present Emperor's predecessors, but few have died, m their beds, and of those few it is doubtful as to whether their end was not brought about by foul means. Daring all his reign the now ruling Czar hns bean surrounded by deadly enemies whose constant plotting it requires incessant vigilance- to defeat— even his coronation had to be deferred for many months lest it should be the opportunity ot the assassin, and the strain of the excessive watchfulness which has been maintained by himself as well as by his immediate attendants must have told its talo upon him, magnificent as is his physique. 1 hat this has been the case there is not wanting evidence to show, as for example m bifi.shooting one of his equerries a few months ago under the impression that he had detected him m a threatening gesture or hostile movement. And if this life of vigilance and anxiety has told upon the Czar, it is natural that it should have operated even more powerfully upon the amiable lady who chares with him the dangerous dignities of the • ussian Imperial throne, and At is, therefore, not surprising to read m recent cablegrams that the Czarina is suffering from melancholia, that she wishes to leave Russia, and that it is believed that unless her wish is yielded to, her mind will become permanently affected. If it be true that the unhappy condition of her Majesty is mainly attributable to the recent accident on the Azov railway, and reading this together with the further intelligence that the accident has also had a depressing effect on the Czar, we are forced to the conclusion that probably the so-called " accident " was not really an accident at all. It is unlikely that the Czar as well as the Czarina would be affected with melancholia as the mere consequence of a train run at too high a speed becoming derailed and capsizing, though we can quite understand that thfs result might be brought about if it his been discovered, that the. disaster was ;intentionally caused and only failed of the fatal effect desired, because this would only be one more proof of the unwearied and implacable efforts of the Nihilufc and other organisations, whoso eventual triumph their Imperial Majesties have only too much reason to dread. Reading between the lines of the cablegram it is plainly to be seen that there was more m this so called railway accident than has yet been made known to the world. ■■<*■"' ' - :

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1888. UNHAPPY ROYALTY., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2002, 1 December 1888

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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1888. UNHAPPY ROYALTY. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2002, 1 December 1888

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