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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas Et Prevalebit MONDAY, APRIL 20, 1885.

The European news this evening is of a pacific character. The Agent-General of Victoria has telegraphed to his Government that affairs look more peaceful, but that the Imperial Government are not in any degree relaxing their military preparations.

A man named Lionel Corbett, charged with obtaining money by false pretences from several publicans in Tinaaru, was arrested in Ashburton by Constable Beddek on Saturday afternoon. Our Chertsey correspondent writes : A meeting of the promoters of the Chertsey Saleyarda Company was held in the store of Mr James Patter Son on Saturday evening. The main object of the meeting was to meet Mr Joseph Hatch, of Invercargill, and confer with him anent the erection of a sheep dip and foot rot-race on the Company’s Saleyards reserve at Chertsey. The following gentlemen were present, v : z :—Messrs Mangham (chairman) Stringfellow, Copeland, McDonald ami Patterson (secretary). The minutes of former meeting having been read and confirmed, and a resume of the past action of the management given, Mr Hatch gave a very intelligent and lucid sketch of the chief features of the construction and management of his stylo of sheep dip and footrot-raca, which seemed to give great satisfaction to those present. After Mr Hatch had been complimented by several gentlemen for the lucidity of his exposition, it was proposed by Mr Rule, and seconded by Mr Copeland—“ That sufficient land be granted to Mr Joseph Hatch of Invercargill, to erect a public sheep dip and footrot-race, and the use of a sufficient portion of the yards to wort the same at an annual rental of 5s for a term of 14 years. Mr Hatch undertaking to erect ths said sheep dip and footrot-race at his owfl expense, after which period a fresh arrangement to be made.” The meeting then adjourned, after passing the usual vote of thanks to Chairman and Secretary. The annual parish meeting of the St Stephen's Church will be held this evening at the Sunday Schoolroom at 7.30. The doctors (writes the Melbourne correspondent of a southern paper) are still divided in opinion on the diagnosis of the disease which, in some symptoms, so much resembles smallpox, and in others is clearly differentiated. Of its contagious character thetr can unhappily no longer be any doubt. One of the resident surgeons at the Melbourne Hospital, two of the medical students, and a patient who was

in the same ward with the man Freeman, who was suffering from the mysterious visitation, have been attacked in a somewhat similar manner, but their cases do not appear to be of a dangerous character. Some of the medical men who have watched the cases hold to the view .that the disease is modified smallpox; but against this theory it is urged that the period of incubation in these new cases has beep much shorter than in smallpox. In the meantime the health authorities are placidly awaiting further developments. In the interests of the public health it is hoped that the disease is not variola, for whilst the Central Board are twiddling their thumbs the dreaded scourge might gain a wide hold on the community.

We are informed by Mr W. 0. Walker, M. H. R., that in response to the petition referred to in our columns some time ago, His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to remit two months of the sentence passed upon John Gilmour. The prisoner will be released on May 4

Readers of the first edition of our last issue will have been surprised when reading our account of Mr Ballance’s visit to Ashburton, by the announcement; —“ JMLr Ballance intended to spend 10 or 12 days in the county inspecting the waste lands of the district.” In our second edition the paragraph was corrected and read “in Canterbury. ” The Ashburton Racing Club have arranged with Messrs Hobbs and Goodwin to work the totalisator at the forthcoming Autumn Race Meeting. A sub-committee-appointed by the Club for the purpose, have arranged a system of tickets which will effectually stop the peccadilloes of those gentry who have at previous meetings found other than cash means by which to enjoy access to the stand and saddling paddocks. 'i he annual harvest thanksgiving service will be held at, St Stephen’s Church on Thursday evening next. The Rev B A. Lingard, of St Luke’s, Christchurch, will preach, and the choir, in addition to the usual thanksgiving hymns, will render a special anthem. We are very glad to learn that 0. Hobbs, who suffered a nasty fall while riding Moody in the Timaru Steeplechase on Friday last, recovered consciousness early on Saturday morning, and is now rapidly improving An enterprising picture dealer in London has imported from Berlin 10,030 photographs of Prince Henry of Battenberg, who is about to marry Princess Beatrice of England. His Worship the Mayor and Mr T. Bullock, J. P., presided at the Resident Magistrate’s Court this morning. A first

offender was fined 5s and costs for drunkenness.—John Tondrae was charged with having been drunk eti Saturday evening last, and, under sub-section 1 of section 7 of the Police Offences Act, with having left a team of horses without proper nourishment. The accused admitted having been drank, but alleged he had left the horses with food and water—Constable Smart said on Saturday night he had found the accused helplessly drunk in tiuvelock street. On reaching the police station the accused made some incoherent remarks about a team, but the police on searching were unable to find any trace of the horses, \esterday morning J. W, Mcßae had reported to the police the discovery in Frisdlnnder Bros’ yard of a team of horses.—J. W. McKae said from information received he proceeded to Friedland or Bros’ yard yesterday and there found a team of horses attached to a dray. The horses had evidently been out all night, and were suffering from cold and hunger. Witness removed the horses to his stables—James Quigley, a farmer, said the accused was in his employ, and had been sent to Roberts’ store on Saturday with a load of wheat. He should have re-

turned on Saturday evening, but did not do so, and as a result or enquirioi made witness found the horse in Mcßae's stables- Witness gave the accused a good character, stating he had previously been a sober and reliable man. —The Bench stated that in consequence of the character given accused by his employer they would deal leniently with the offence Accused was fined 10s and costa, with the alternative of 48 hours’ imprisonment, for drunkenness, and fined 20s for neglecting the horses under hia charge.

Holloway’s Pills.— -The chiefest wonder of modern times.—This incomparable medicine increases the appetite, strengthens the stomach, cleanses the liver, corrects biliousness, prevents flatulency, purifes the system, invigorates the nerves, and re-instates sound health. The enormous demand for these Pills throughout th® globe astonishes everybody, and a single tria convinces the most sceptical that no medicine equals Holloway’s Pills in its ability to remove all complaints incidental to the human race, They are a blessing to the afflicted, and aboon to all that labour under internal or external disease. The purification of thejblood, removal of all restraint from the secretive organs, and gentle aperitive action are the prolific sources or the extensive curative range of Holloway’s Pills. Advt.J J

We have received from the Crown Lands epnrtment a copy of “ A Treatise and Handbook of Orange Culture in Auckland, New Zealand,” by Mr G. E. Alderton, and published by authority of the Government. Daring a recent visit made by Mr Alderton to New South Wales he was empowered by the Government to make enquiries with reference to the cultivation of the orange. Mr Alder ton concludes that the East Coast of the North Island from Napier to the N rlh Cape is well suited to the cultivation of the orange, which ho thinks would be a remunerative occupation,.

Herrings must be very plentiful in the sounds about Picton. A gentleman one day lately caught over four tons of them. The Timaru Herald says it is evident that the present Ministry regard the Legislative Council “ merely as a convenient means of pensioning off political followers.” A recent Gazette gives the estimated population of Melbourne and suburbs, within a radius of ten miles from the General Post Office, 322,690, being an increase of over 18,000 since 1833. Milton, in Otago, must bo a very sober place. Tne Bruce Herald , published in Milton, says.—“ The goodly town of Balclutha must be going, sadly astray. Last Wednesday there were no less than six drunks before the Court, Our average in Milton is scarcely one a year.” The Right Hon Lord Charles Beresford was born on February 18, ]846, and became a cadet when only thirteen years of age. He became a sub-li£u‘enant in January, 1866 ; a lieutenant in September, 1868 ; and commanded the Condor during the bombardment of Alexandria, when he distinguished himself to such an extent that he was promoted to the rank. of captain. Lord Charles Beresford’s latest achievement was his gallant rercus of Sir Charles Wilson and his party, who were stranded in the Nile at the Shabluka Cataract. There is a pretty general belief that Lord Charles is just a jolly, reckless, and dashing Irishman, who goes into danger for the fun of the thing, but those who know him beat think differently Ho is not gallant but a very simple--1 minded man *His private telegrams show this pretty clearly. On his arrival at Mei tammeh, and after the defence of the ■ zereeba, his first message home was : “ Quite well and cheery.” Another message, after the return of his steamer with I th ' rescued party, ran like this : “ Quite i well Desperate action ; but Providence i took care of us.”

An officer at present in the Soudan, referring to the burial of General Stewart, writes We buried him in the little British graveyard near the Gakdul Wells. It was the most impressive scene any one ever went through. We formed a procession in the valley headed by the firing party and the band of the Royal Sussex. The pall-bearera we.ro Majors Hon 0. Byng and Gould, Lieutenants Lord, Browning, Douglas, and Dawson, and Captain Rhodes. Colonel Talbot read the service. I looked up once. It is no exaggeration to say that every one round the place had utterly broken down. I have lost the kindest, best friend man ever had, and England, I honestly think, one of her best officers. It was a most trying time for him, that march out from El Gubat ; but the doctors say nothing could possibly have saved him from the first. I fully believe them. The 19th Hussars made a forced march to try to be in time for the funeral, but arrived just too lata. This morning they came and asked to be allowed to do the stonework round the grave, and have been working all day.” In the midst of the black and troublous sky which encompasses us on every side there is one bright gleam of light, and that is afforded by the remarkable readiness with which the colonists are volunteering on every hand to send their sons to fight England’s battle in the Soudan, If they will do this in a wretched,. mismanaged business like this, what would they do if England herself were really in danger 7 At the same lime it is well to remember that the colonists have not yet fully realised the extent to which the Home Government has discredited itself by its vacillation, indecision, and irresolution in Egyptian affairs Should they realise the extent to which the power of will and facu’tyof judgment has died out amongst us, they may look upon the connection in quite a different As an old Victorian writes us :~Baing grown up men and women they will frankly grasp the friendly hand of a strong ma.i, but will refuse to be tagged to the apron strings of a screeching, gabbling, and irresolute old woman.” —St James's Badyet The comforts possessed by the Anjtralians are the envy and admiration of their comrades in camp at Suakim. The following challenge was issued recently :—“ William Ward (the Flying Guardsman and champion wood chopper of Northampton) is still open to chop wood against anyone (bar Gladstone) for three or five days, for L 5 i side, or he will give Alf Tew five hours’ start in five days' work for a similar amount. Although the probability of the militia being called out is remote, the following list of persons exempt by the Militia Act from service may he of interest :—Law

officers, members of the General Assembly, Secretaries and Under-Secretaries of the Colonial Government, the clergy and ministers of all religious denominations, who are officiating ministers within the meaning of the Marriage Act, College and University Professors, sheriffs and constables, telegrah clerks, warders of the public ijgaols and lunatic asylums, attendants at hospital, post-masters and mail carriers, officers acting in the management of or collection of the Customs revenue, schoolmasters actually engaged in teaching, seafaring men, otherwise than watchmen and boatmen, volunteers, and persons affiicted with lunacy cr physical infirmity. On *he advice of Lord Wolseley, the intelligence department of the War office has sent a circular to the various London newspapers, pointing out that almost everything published in the papers in this country having reference to the Soudan is translated into Arabic, and eventually reaches the Mahdi. Perhaps the hint to exercise more caution was not altogether unwarranted. •We are in an enemy’s country, and yet the names of natives who come into our camp and give valuable information to the General regarding the movements of the tribes and the position of the Mahdi’s forces are given in full. With aych a clue given, those men run in still greater peril of their lives, for the penalty of death is mercilessly dealt out to those who are discovered aiding the infidel. That there are secret agents at work in our midst and in the various European cities aiding the cause of the Mahdi seems to have been placed lately beyond doubt. —Home News. Indigestion and Liver Complaints.—For these complaints Baxter’s Compound Quinine Pills have proved a specific, acting powerfully on the liver and mildly on the stomach. Sold everywhere, or post free from J. Baxter, Chemist, Christchurch, for 19 or 44 stamps. • August Flower.— The most miserable beings in the world are those suffering from dyspepsia and liver complaint. More than 75 per cent of the people are afflicted with these two diseases and their effects ; such as sour stomach, sick headache. habitual costiveness, palpitation of the heart, heart burn, waterbrash, gnawing and burning pains at the pit of the stomach, yellow skin, coated tongue and dis.agreeable taste in the mouth, coming U P of food after eating, low spirits, etc. Go to your druggist and get a bottle of august flower. This valuable medicine has cured thousands and thousands of sufferers, and is known in all civilised countries. Two doses will relieve you. It costs only 3s fid a bottle. Sample bottles, 6(1.--[ADVT,

The Ashburton Club, Fowler’s Buildings, will be opened this evening.

The talented Faust family are announced to appear In the Town Hall on Wednesday and Thursday evenings next. Those who have not seen these clever performers can have but little idea of their wondrous feats; they are without doubt the best musical-acrobatic company that has ever travelled this colony, and we trust willjsecnrethe patronage their brilliant per formance deserves. The company will give an afternoon performance on Thursday for school children and families, which, we have no doubt, will be largely attended.

Mr Walker, M.H.R., Chairman of the County Council, owing to the late hour at which he received notice of the Minister’s visit to Ashburton, was unable to interview Mr Ballancs on Saturday. However, Messrs Mainwaring and Baxter, of the County Council staff, met Mr Ballanoe during the afternoon and discussed several matters connected with Council business. The officers pointed out that the Council had planted 500 acres of reserves with forest trees, and Mr Ballanoe intimated his willingness to vest a similar area in the Council ; he directed the officers to request the Council to forward to the Lands Department particulars of the land available. —Mr Ballanoe said he would agree to reserve the land adjoining intakes of water races with a view to maintaining access to the sources of the water supply.—Mr Ballanoe promised the Government would consider a proposal made by the Council to vest all unsold Crown lands in river beds with County Councils or River Boards for protective purposes. This afternoon in Burnett street a horse

attached to a baker’s cart belonging to Mr W. Marsh, fell and upset the vehicle. The driver escaped without injury and the damage sustained by the cart was of a trivial character.

We lake the following from the current number of the N.Z Schoolmaster :—From a careful consideration of all the data, we are forced to the conclusion that an injustice has been done to Mr Dempsey, of tl>o _ shburton Borough School. If compelled to go, we trust Mr Dempsey will speedily find a more successful sphere. Replying to the Ashburton County Council, the local Sergeant of Police has intimated his readiness to assist in prosecuting the owners of unregistered dogs. Residents in Rakaia will be pleased to learn it is the intention of the Faust Family to perform in that town on Friday evening next. The following evening the Company will appear at Southhridge. On Saturday afternoon the Hon Mr Ballance, acounpanied by Mr Hatch, M.H.R., inspected the Ashburton Hospital. The Minister expressed himself highly pleased with the appearance and management of the institution. The Minister for Lands and Defence, left Ashburton by the express on Saturday evening, and reached Wellington yesterday. We are informed that his return to Wellington was rendered necessary by the business in connection with the Defence Department having accumulated during his absence The programme of the first meeting of the Ashburton Coursing Club to be held on April 27th and 23th is advertised in this issue. It includes a Puppy Stakes and an All-Aged Stakes, and nominations I must be made to the Secretary at the Somerset Hotel by 9 p.m., on Saturday next.

Use American Co.s Hop Bitters once and you will use no other medicine. Test it. Take no other. Be sure and read. Skinny Men. —“ Wells’ Health Renevver restores health and vigor, cures dyspepsia, im potence, debility The N.Z. Drug Co. General Agents. * A’ other unfortunate. —Again we must draw the attention of our readers to the fact that a ,£2,424 stock of Clothing and General Drapery, in the estate of Dennis O’Connell, trading in Lyttelton and Cristchurch, now bankrupt, was purchased by H. E. May & Co., of the Hall, High street, for £954, or only a little over one-third of its value. H. E. M. and Co. are now selling it at half the marked price, which surely ought to secure a speedy clearance.

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas Et Prevalebit MONDAY, APRIL 20, 1885., Ashburton Guardian, Volume V, Issue 1518, 20 April 1885

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3,188

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas Et Prevalebit MONDAY, APRIL 20, 1885. Ashburton Guardian, Volume V, Issue 1518, 20 April 1885

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