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MADAME RITA AND MR RADCLIFF.

By reference to our advertising columns it will be seen that there is a rare musical treat in store for the Ashburton public, as on Wednesday and Thursday next there will appear at the Oddfellows’ Hall, two of the meet distinguished and talented musicians that have ever visited the Australian colonies. We refer to Madame Pauline Rita (one of the most celebrated vocalists of the day) and Mr John Radcliff (the most perfect and illnstrous flautist the world has ever known) Throughout their recent Australian tour Madame Rita and Mr Radcliff were everywhere received with a perfect farore of acclamation by large and intensely delighted audiences, and after their performances were constantly serenaded by the bands of the various cities and towns. Of the concerts given in Australia, the papers speak in the very highest terms of praise. As a flautist Mr Radcliff is unequalled, and the flute as played by him becomes a noble instrument, giving forth sounds of exquisite sweetness. Speaking of Mr Badcliffa playing the Sydney Daily Telegraph fays,

“ there is a spirit in every phrase, and in every note a ringing sound, which stirs the blood and sets it dancing to the player’s time. This, when the music is merry, at other times the soft, round tones fall upon the ear languidly enough. As regards mere execution Mr Radcliff performs the gymnastics of his art without apparent effort- On the matter of flutes and flute playing Mr Radcliff is an ardent enthusiast, and is able to bring musical rounds out of every reed instrument that was aver invented, from the pipe upon which the “ Great God Pan ” himself is understood to have played to the complex many keyed flute which now represents the perfection of nstruments of this class. Mr Radcliff traces the origin of the flute back several thousand years, and plays open thirty five different instruments, the most primitive being a human bone piered with two holes. He also sends music forth from what he terms the father of all the bagpipes, an instrument composed of the skin of a pig fitted with a reed, through which, is produced that peculiar sound so endeared to the hearts of all true Highlanders. The three-holed pipe of the time of Shakespeare; the Tye, or Chinese flute; the musette, the forefather of the chanter of the bagpipes ; the “ Vagabond ” flute, and the nose flute (used by the natives of New Guinea); the snake charmers’ flute ; the fife and tin whistle ; .and many other varieties are played by Mr Radcliff, who also prefaces the introduction of each instrument by a few explanatory remarks as to its origin and nse. Up to this point Mr Radcliff keeps his audience deeply in'terested, but directly he introduces the modern flutes, the playing upon which has w in him such high renown, his listeners become electrified and delighted beyond measure by the purity of tone, the enormous power of exquisite sound which is brought forth from the flute A’Amorer, the cylinder flute and the silver bass flute. The bass flute is quite a novelty, and until Mr RadclifFs advent had never been heard in New Zealand. From this instrument Mr Radcliff sends forth a volume of full, round, melodious and liquid sounds that make the heart thrill with the moat intense joy and delight. The musical critic of the Sydney Evening News says, in concluding a moat eulogistic, notice—“ With respect to Mr Radcliff a playing there is only one word that sufficiently characterises it, and that word is ‘perfection.’ He is a perfect flats player with respect to intonation, the management of the lip s and breath, tongaing, power of expression, time and marvellous rapidity of fingering. Runs in dami-semiquavers can be performed by him at the rate of 100 miles and hour, and yet every note will be distinct to the ear. His variations on wellknown and popular airs are marvellously brilliant and beautiful” Mr Radcliff is a sistei by bis talented wife, Madame Pauline Rita, a highly cultivated and accomplished vocalist, and a lady who has won a very high reputation. She possesses a rich, powerful, and remarkably pure soprano voice, and her style of singing is highly artistic and finished, besides which her manner is most irresistibly charming. Soma of her favorite songs are—‘‘The Bird that came in Spring,” “ Lo, hear the gentle Lark,” “ Home, Sweet Home," “ The Child and the Skylark,” in which she is accompanied on the flute by Mr Radcliff. The concert will, without doubt, be the best that has ever been given here, and those who are desirous of enjoying so genuine a musical treat we would advise to pay an early visit to Mr H. M. Jones’ music warehouse, where a plan of the hall may be seen and seats secured. That the hall will be crowded with an enthusiastic audience is a foregone conclusion.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18850417.2.12

Bibliographic details

MADAME RITA AND MR RADCLIFF., Ashburton Guardian, Volume V, Issue 1516, 17 April 1885

Word Count
817

MADAME RITA AND MR RADCLIFF. Ashburton Guardian, Volume V, Issue 1516, 17 April 1885

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