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EUROPEAN ITEMS.

(By Telegraph fkom Wellington.)

(“Age" Special.) London, April 8. Mr Murray Smith, acting upon instructions received from Victoria, has ordered a number of Whitehead torpedoes. Prince Bismarck has issued an order forbidding German manufacturers to supply torpedoes to any foreign powers. The Victorian L 4,000,000 four per cent, redemption loan is to be placed upon the London market very shortly. London, April 9. The report that Earl Roseberry is about to visit Berlin, with the object of concluding an agreement with the German Government on the subject of .annexation in the Pacific and in Africa, is declared to bo premature.

(From the “ Evening News ” War Correspondent. ) Suakim, April 5.

In the skirmishing near Taraai the Imperial troops had one private killed and an officer wounded, 'Jhe New South Wales contingent who smelt powder for the first time behaved with great steadiness all through. They had three men slightly wounded, namely, Privates Charles Harrison, C. 0. Downey, and Learoyd. The enemy’s loss is not known. On this occasions our fellows did not get the share of fighting that was given to some of the other troops, and I am inclined to think that the geneial in command wished to ascertain how they would he? have in actual warfare before he carried out his promised of brigading them with the Gua-ds. That he is satisfied is sh >wn by the announcement now that in the general advance we are to have the place of honor.

Suakim, April 6

The weather is getting very warm, and the heat where we now are is intensely dry—just like that of Darling, New South Wales. Our fellows stand it very well. Attacks of sunstroke cf a slight nature are prevalent, principally among the 1m perial troops.

Suakim, April 7.

The Arabs beat up our quarters on the zareeba on the road to Handoub last night. They came up without order in pretty considerable numbers, but warned by their former attacks on the zareeba at Tamai, they made no attempt at a general assault. However, they opened a brisk but harmless fire. They made their appearance on two aides of the zareeba, and their bullets, with few exceptions, passed over our heads. At the same time, the situation was quite sufficiently dangerous to test our men’s nerves, discipline and order under fire, and what these ware you will judge when I tell you that in the morning the officer in command of our post, General A. J. Lyon Fremantle, complimented the New South Wales men on their general smartness, but more particularly upon the way in which they returned the A.rab fire. This was not done at haphazard but like marksmen should do, taking advantage of every little opening in the z ireeba from which a fair sight of the enemy could be obtained, and not blazing away recklessly, but only firing when there seemed to be something worth hitting. ihe guards and the rest of the garrison were equally brisk in the Arab fire, and it is supposed that a good many Arabs were hit and carried off by their friendi. The exchange of firing lasted a couple of hours, after which the Arabs drew off and we slept peaceful/ for the rest of the night.

Suakim, April 8

A camel driver who returned to the headquarters camp last night, after having been missing some time, reports that he was taken prisoner during the fight at Hassen on March 22 between the British, under General Graham, and the Arabs, under Osman Digua, when the Arabs, though subsequently beaten, fought stubbornly for some time. The man was with the Arabs as a prisoner when our men had their first “brush” with the enemy at Tamai on Friday morning, and when, with the Guards, we drove them back among the lower hills. The camel driver reports that our fire on that occasion was much more destructive to the enemy than was supposed, and they had 250 killed and wounded. This confirms the impression that thq Australians are showing their superiority as,marksmen, which I mentioned in ray telegram yesterday, when I described the night attack on the zireeba on the road to Handoub. The carnal driver says that the Arabs are very much disheartened, and cannot now be brought up to make a charge upon us. They are burning tbeir villages and retiring inland. As a result of the depressed state of the Arabs they released their watch over their prisoners who escaped without much difficulty and came into Suakim as I have described. The New South Wales Artillery still remains at the headquarters, close to Suakiip, and it is not yet known whether it will join in the general advance upon Berbsr or remain at Suakim. The former is, however, most likely if the report of the camel driver as to the demoralisation of Digna’s people bs true.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18850416.2.7

Bibliographic details

EUROPEAN ITEMS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume V, Issue 1515, 16 April 1885

Word Count
812

EUROPEAN ITEMS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume V, Issue 1515, 16 April 1885

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