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Scratched. Matanaka has been scratched for the Wellington Cup.

The Mail. —The ’Frisco mail arrived here last evening by the ordinary 7.20 train from Christchurch, and was at once sorted up and delivered by the postal officials with their usual despatch. As ii burton Eijpes. —A small squad visited the targets this morning for rifle practice, Corporal Andrews being leading man with 51 points for 20 shots at the three, four, five, and six hundred yards ranges.

Det rmined Suicide. —Last night, as the train from Palmerston, which arrives at 9 p.m., was nearing Dunedin, and just as it had got to Castle street crossing, at the entrance to the railway y rd, a man, who was observed standing near the line, suddenly threw himself in front of the engine across the ra Is. He was shockingly mangled, and death was instantaneous. The body had not been identified at a late hour last night.

Mount Hutt Licensing Committee. —An adjourned meeting of the above Committee took place yesterday at the Road Board office. Present—Messrs McMillan (in the chair), Jackson, Cameron, and Dent. The Inspector’s report was read. Mr Patton had not attended to the instructions of the Committee re alterations ordered, and it was decid:d to call Mr Patton’s attention to the fact that unless he carried out all instructions the Licensing Committee were in a position to cancel hi - license. The Co'onial Secretary wrote, stating that Mr W. L. Orr had been elected a member of the Committee in place of Mr Pannett. Mr Oxley waited on the Committee, and submitted plana for a new hotel, asking if they would be in favor of granting a license wore such a house to be erected. It was pointed out that the house, as per plan, would coat something like LI,BOO to complete, and that it was scarcely fair for a man to expend that amount unless some favorable answer was given about granting a license. The clck called the attention of the Committee to the amended Act, 1882, re meetings when there was no new business or complaintfrom the Inspector re any of the licensed houses. It was decided not to hold meetings unless the Clerk advised the members of business. Several accounts were passed for payment. Upon consideration of Mr Oxley’s application, the Chairman stated that as far as the present committee were concerned they would bo in favor of granting a license if a good house, equal to the plans submitted, were erected, but of course they could not give a definite promise, as a new set of men might be elected on the Committee at the next election. However, they would recommend same if new one were formed. Mr Oxley then thanked th* Chairman and withdrew, and the meeting adjourned.

The Property Tax.—-Janiiarjr2sth is the day gazetted for the payment of the property tax. - Deputy Property Tax Commissioner. —Mr Charles M. Grumble, the Deputy Property Tax Commissioner, arrived in Ashburton by this morning’s express.

Sale at Tinwald. —Messrs J. T. Ford and Co. notify an important sale of groceries, hardware, drapery, clothing, etc. ; also book debts belonging to the late firm of Biggs and Reid at Tinwald, on Tuesday 19th inst.

Alleged Attempt to Murder.—A man named Thomas Horton has been arrested at Auckland on a charge of attempting to murder a married woman named Mary Jane Raynor. The trouble arose out of a dispute with the husband of the assaulted woman. Warm.—Says a Press Association telegram from Wanganui:--“ The heat is intense, and there have been numerous cases of sunstroke in this district. Two gaol warders are down with it. E. Beale, of the Auckland Second Eleven, is still here ill with sunstroke and low fever.”

Ole Soldiers and their Land Claims. —The old soldiers of Wanganui sent Home a petition to the Prince of Wales asking for assistance re land grants, and received a reply that his Royal Highness cannot interfere, but stating that he asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies to inquire into the matter.

Bell for the Catholic Church.—We learn that a very successful founding of a new bell for the Roman Catholic Church here has been made at the Canterbury Foundry, Christchurch. The bell is 4 cwt in weight, and has a full, sonorous tone, well adapted for the purpose to which it is to be applied. The work, as a whole, is said to reflect great credit on those ha- ing it in hand. Temperance Demonstration. Tomorrow the temperance people are going to celebrate Anniversary Day by what the advertisement appearing in our columns calls a “United Grand Temperance Demonstration,” All persons desirous of taking part in the procession are invited to assemble at the Templar Hall at noon, and soon after a stare will be made for the paddock, where all sorts of sports will be indulged in during the afternoon. In the evening a tea meeting will take place at the Town Hall, to be followed by a concert. Mr J. W. Jago, P.G.W.C.T , has

promistd to address the meeting during the evening. Insufficient Evidence.—At the Wanganui District Court, on Wednesday, a man named Francis Williamson was sentenced to twelve months’ imprisonment for perjury, and a petition for appeal to the Governor is being got up, on the ground that the verdict of the jury was not justified. The prisoner swore, in a recent civil case at the Supreme Court, that a certain Native was alive in 1872, and a mass of Native evidence was called to prove that he died in 1899 A document is said to be in the possi salon of the Bank of New Zealand alleged to have been signed by the deceased Native in 1872 and it is said that other evidence can be brought forward. The local Press ridicules the verdict, contending that the evidence was not sufficient to prove wilful perjury.

New Zealand Diamonds. —As there appears little probability that the Government intend offering a bonus for the discovery of a payable diamond field, says the Christchurch Telegraph, we understand that Mr Jacobsen, of Christchurch, intends very shortly making known the locality where he found the diamonds which of late have formed the theme of general conversation and interest in this city. In so doing Mr Jacobsen believes he will be throwing open a valuable field of industry, and that should such prove to be the case the Government may eventually see their way t« grant a bonus in accordance with the nature of the returns and the value of the field opened. We hope Mr Jacobsen will not think us ill-natured if we suggest to him that if diamonds are to be picked up here by the handful, as he a sorts, he will be well able to afford to hand over the bonus to the Industrial Association! The Roads and Bridges Construction Act. —Says the correspondent of the Press, wiring from Wellington on Wednesday night:—Hardly any applications in regular form have yet been received for assistance under the Roads and Bridges Construction Act, 1882. Numerous enquiries have been made as to the loans obtainable, but in most cases these have merely re:ulted in a request that the extension of time be granted for getting out the necessary plans required by the Act, or else the proposal is that funds may be granted in the absence of completed plans. The Government of course are absolutely barred by the t -rms of the Act from granting either of these concessions, and so there is no alternative but to refuse and warn local bodies that complete applications and plans must be in by the 31st instant, or else they must go into next year’s appropriations. Curiously enough, some of the local bodies have actually supposed that extension of time to 30th June will be granted, evidently oblivious of the fact that if the applications are not in by the 31st of December they must perforce go with the next period, which extends to 30th June ; so the effect of their being unable to come to time will be exactly what they ask for, in ignorance of provisions of the law. A general mistake made by local bodies seems to be in attempting too much at the outset, that is, undertaking works quite beyond their power to finish in the year, and therefore capable of being postponed to next without any disadvantage being incurred at present. Not half a dozen complete and regular applications have bam received fromjtho local bodies from the whole colony, and there is only intimation of one poll being taken as lo the raising a rate under the Act. It is possible, however, that many more may come in before the end of the month. A South African Gold Rush.—Another gold rush is taking place in South Africa, where the reports (says the Colonies and India) of enormously rich finds of gold being made at the Do Kaap, in the Transvaal, are engaging the attention of all classes to the exclusion almost of every other topic. At Spitzkof one digger is reported to be turning out over lOOoz of gold a week ; a neighbor of his has from 20 to 30 men in his employ, all successfully engaged in the all-absorbing search for gold. A third man reports having picked up Hlb weight of gold in six weeks by merely turning over the stoneA. On the banka of the Kaap 60 farmers claim that their lands are gold-bearing. But this very fact makes one rather suspicious as to the reality of the assertion, for if the land in question was really auriferous it would seem more likely that the fortun

ate owners would endeavor to keep the matter secret until its wealth had been proved. Undoubtedly, however, gold has been found, and in considerable abund-

ance ; but caution should be exercised by those who meditate the “rush.” A shrewd observer remarks that those with money are not so eager to join as those without ; and this indicates that the permanent gold-bearing capacity of this new field has net been absolutely proved as yet. The existence of gold in the Transvaal has long been known, and there are vast stores of other minerals, which, if not so fascinating as gold, will eventually repay working even more thoroughly than the precious metal itself. There is always the risk that “rushes” of this kind will entail much misery on disappointed speculators and prospectors; but an ac-

cession of fresh population in a naturally rich country cannot be regarded as otherwise than an advantage in the long run.

Cricket.— The Aucklanders wen the match against “ Sleepy ” by five runs, the Nelsonian# scoring 150 in their second innings, of which eleven were extras.

Post Sessional. —Mr Fish, M. 11. R., addressed his constituents last night at the Princess Theatre. There was a good attendance. Mr Fish spoke for nearly three hours. He was accorded a unanimous vote of confidence.

A Brief Sojourn. —Sir Julius Vogel’s stay in this colony will be brief. He will only remain a few days in Dunedin, and will probably only visit Christchurch and Wellington before he takes his departure from New Zealand.

Another Illuminator. —Sti I another now gas producing patent is to be applied for by Dunedin manufacturers. The gas is to be made from any fatty substance, at such cost that it can be supplied at 2 1 per thousand feet, and coal gas works can be utilised for its manufacture.

Timaru Harbor Loan.— The poll for the proposed harbor loan of LIOO.OOO will be held on Tuesday next. Great interest U being taken in the matter by all parts of the district, the only opposition, so far, coming from Geraldine, where Mr Postlethwaite, a member of the Harbor Board, is strongly opposing the loan on the ground that only two harbors are required for the South Island. At the public meeting held yesterday afternoon, influential committees were appointed for all parts of the district to work in support of the loan. Sou ih Rakaia Sports.— A meeting was hold last evening at Howell’s, South Rakaia Hotel, Mr R. Davies in the chair. The object of the meeting was to arrange for sports on Boxing day. Only very few of the old residents of the district were present, and but little interest was shown. A committee was appointed to arrange matters and collect subscriptions, as follows :—Messrs Shellock, Howell, Buack, Kemble, Inder, Dunford, Compton, C. Lake, and Patton, with power to add 1o their number. It was arranged that the committee should meet on Saturday evening to arrange a list of prizes, etc. Some Ll 7 was collected in the room. It was decided that the events bo advertised in the local papers. The meeting then adjourned.

The Dunethst Harbor Works. —At the Dunedin Harbor Board meeting yesterday, Mr Fish proposed a resolution to the effect that before proceeding with the new scheme of harbor and bar improvements, as proposed by the new engineer, Mr Barr, the Board take the opinion of Sir John Goode upon the proposal. The motion, after discussion, was adjourned. Relative to the same subject, Mr Burt gave notice of a motion—“ That a bonus of LSOO be offered for the best scheme for bar improvement; ” and Mr Larnach gave notice of a motion as follows :—“ That all works of the Board towards deepening the harbor be stayed meanwhile, until tenders can be called for all future works, whether as a whole or in part, in relation to the deepening of the harbor. The tenders, with specifications, to be advertised a sufficient time in Great Britain, America, and Australia, and the tenderers to take over any of the Board’s present plant they may require at a valuation.” Thknand Now. —The following fantastic pen-and-ink sketch of Sir Garnet Wolseley is given by an English paper : When Sir Garnet Wo'seley was young he was a good deal of a fop in Dublin, as was the Duke of Wellington in his youth, and he used to drive a drag with his brothers

daily into Dyce’s Repository, now the family seat, near Dublin. He then wore long curls. Time has worked much change. He is now spare, lantern-jawed, with short grey hair, and a blonde mous-

tache. In the field he wears a yellow sunhelmet, wound about with a handkerchief of check ; his red coat is open at the chest, and spotted with many stains of grease; he has a variegated cravat, a woollen shirt of a loud pattern, grey checked trousers, yellow riding boots and spurs, an opera glass with yellow case and strap, -°nd yellow revolver-belt with cartridge case ; yellow gauntlets, a violet pockethandkerchief stuck in his red coat, a gigantic pair of dark blue spectacles, and in his hand he flourishes a fan to keep off the flies.

I Archibald Forbes and ahe Candid Auditor —Archibald Forbes tells the following good story of his experiences as a lecturer:—“lt is bad enough to realise | that you aro a failure, but it is quite too harrowing to be told so to your face, and | all the more harrowing when your infor- | mant does not know whom he is address- ‘ ing. Once long ago, I gave an isolated ’ lecture in Manchester on the Carlist war in Spain, from which I had recently returned. It was a poor subject, it was a bad lecture, and it wai a worse lecturer. I felt rather miserable as I stood in the auditorium, trying to converse with the secretary, while the tag-end of the audience slowly dispersed. A young gentleman sauntered up, and, not recognising me as the lecturer, addressed the secretary. ‘ Infernally poor lecturer,’ this friendly creature observed, ‘ Dont you think so V he asked the secretary. That official remained dumb in embarrassment. ‘ Dont you think so sir?’ said he, addressing me. ‘ I quite agree with you,’ was my reply, in sad truth. f Of course it was,’ he continued. ‘We all know the fellow can write first-rate, but ho ought to stick to In's pen and not try to lecture, for he can’t lecture worth a blank. Isn’t that so, sir V again addressing me as a previous sympathiser. Again I expressed agreement with him, and he was proceeding with detailed criticism of an emphatic character,- when the secretary, in a cold perspiration, clutche I hold of him, dragged him to one side, and whispered something to him. The next thing I saw of the frank and ingenuous critic was his fluttering coat-tails as he dashed headlong from the hall. He could not rally himself even to apologise; and, besides, what had he to apologise for ?” Holloway’s Pills are strongly recommended to all persons who are much reduced in power and condition, whoso stomachs are weak, and whose nerves are shattered. The beneficial effects of these Pills will be perceptible after a few days’ trial, though a more extended course may be required to re-establish perfect health. Holloway’s medicine acts on the organs ot digestion, and induces complete regularity in the stomach, liver, pancreas, and kidneys. This treatment is both safe and certain in result, and is thoroughly consistent with j observation, experience, and common sense. The purification of the blood, the removal of all noxious matter from the secretions, and the 1 excitement of gentle action in the bowels, are 1 the sources of the curative powers of Hollo- < way’s Pills.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18821215.2.6

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume IV, Issue 819, 15 December 1882

Word Count
2,904

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume IV, Issue 819, 15 December 1882

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