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THE SHOW.

Owing to the number of exhibits, and the late hour at which the judging concluded yesterday, we were unable to complete our report of the Show in our last issue. Taking up the thread of our report where we dropped it yesterday, we coma

to the corrugated, iron shed near the <,secretary's office, ,which was cramfall of . wonders. The dairy produce, numbering .• forty exhibits, made a conspicuous display : here. The judges were Messrs John Orr, Donald Williamson, and Alfred Harrison, the marshal in attendance being Mr Rudolph Friedlander. In the class for best 3 lbs of fresh butter (without salt or prints) there were sixteen competitors, and the appearance of the exhibits proved beyond a doubt that most excellent fresh butter can be made in the Ashburton county. Mr J. M. Smith showed a splendid sample, which was deservedly awarded a first prize, Mrs O’Brien, of Grove Farm, taking second honors, and Mrs Patterson, junior—who, by-the-way, showed a nice, well-flavored sample was awarded a highly-commended ticket. Mrs Weston’s exhibit was a very tempting one, and for color and flavor appeared to be all that could be desired. For some reason, however which wo were unable to learn, the judges passed it by. In the class for best display of fancy butter, not less than two pounds, there were seven exhibitors. The great heat of the day somewhat affected the appearance of the dishes of rings, roses, scollops, squares, and other fanci-fully-prepared exhibits in this class, at II they attracted a lot of attention. Mrs Wallace took a first prize, Mrs J. 0. Bell a second, and Mrs G. Gilmour a highlycommended card. There was only one pjjtr\ for best keg of salt butter——that of Mr j. Small, who gained a first prize for an excellent exhibit. The class for the best colonial cheese, of not less than fifteen pounds, was only represented by one entry, Mr Gilmour’s, and this also was awarded a first prize. There was also but a solitary entry in the class for best side of New Zealand cured bacon (smoked). For this Mr J. W. Stringfellow secured a first prize. For best side New Zealand bacon (unsmoked), Mr Stringfellow again scored a first, Mr Jas. Croy taking a second, and Mr T. N. Digby getting a commended. For best two hams (smoked), Mr J. W. Stringfellow’s exhibit, the only one in the class, was awarded a first. For best two hams (unsmoked), Mr J. W. Silcock took a first prize, and Mr Jas. Croy a commended ticket. In tempting proximity to the butter and cheese were three loaves of bread shown by Mr Thos. Taylor, of Ashburton, which were awarded well merited recognition, being a first rate sample of the staff of life. This was the only exhibit in the class. Mr G. J. Martin, butcher, of Ashburton, secured a first prize for best round of corned beef, for which Mr Thos. Quill offered a prize of LI Is. Quitting the dairy produce we pass over to the New Zealand manufactures and produce shown in the same shed. The judges for these goods were Messrs J. P. Jameson, R Sutherland, and A. Orr, the marshall in attendance being Mr K. Alcorn. Following the order of the catalogue we come to that most interesting exhibit—the beer. The kegs were surrounded all the afternoon by a most appreciative crowd bent on practica.ly testing for themselves the quality of the tipple. For beat five gallons of ale (imported hops allowed), the Lion Brewery took a first, and Messrs Moore and Sons a second prize. For best five gallons of porter the positions were reversed, Messrs Moore and Sons taking a first, and the Lion Brewery Company a second prize. Messrs Moore and Sons also showed some capital ale and stout, which was highly commended by the judges. The Kaiapoi Woollen Factory had a nice collection of their well-known goods, which were exhibited by Messrs Mitchell and Turner, and the whole of the things, comprising tweeds, blankets, hosiery, etc., having been purchased by the firm. Mr Thos. Chambers had a show case filled with coverings for the understandings, and for style and finish the goods would not disgrace Regent street. They were the only exhibits in the class, and secured a first. Mr Smithson took a highly commended ticket for mould candles, being the only exhibitor of the article, and a first prize for yellow soap, there bein' also no competition in this class. Amongst the extra exhibits Mr J. Meech had a really elegant suite of drawing-room furniture, and also a suite of furniture for the dining-room. These goods wore remarkably well finished, and, occupying a conspicuous position, attracted the attention of every person who entered the shed. There was no competition, and both suites secured a first prize, Mr W. Davis, of East street, exhibited a very neat and attractive suite of bedroom furniture, which was highly commended. Mr F. T. Mayo showed some of the celebrated bone dust from the Hampstead Mills, and secured a highly commended card. Mr J. R. Steel, blacksmith, had quite an extensive assortment of horseshoes on view, ranging from the light and elegant shoe for the racer to the heavy article intended for the use of the farm horse. The surprising thing about these shoes was that they were all made of old iron worked up by hand. Thty were highty commended. The New Zealand Pickle Preserving Company showed an excellent assortment of pickles, and got a highly commended card for their trouble. Amongst the most interesting exhibits in the shed were several cheeses from the Flemington Cheese and Butter Factory. These cheeses, the first turned out at Flemington, bore the crown brand, the Factory having been giv n the name of the crown in accordance with th ‘ suggestion of Mr Bow-on. who evidently thinks there is something in a name, Shakespeare notwithstanding. The cheeses ranged in size from 1301bs, or thereabouts, to 501bs. They were just three weeks old, and therefore too young to be tasted, doubtless much to the regret of the crowds of visitors, who would have been only too glad to have assisted the judges in arriving at an opinion as to quality and flavor, etc. But these cheeses are already firm as a rock and give promise of turning out a prime sample. They were highly commended, and had they been “ ripe ” would doubtless have taken higher honors. Mrs W. H. Zouoh secured a highly commended ticket for some fine langshan fowls, and Mr W. J. Silcock took a first for white dorkings, Master H. Tasker securing a second for a pen of the same birds. Mr Silcock was also awarded a highly commended for some buff cochins.

A few extra exhibits still remain unnoticed, but as we append the complete prize list, the omissions will not be of so much consequence as they otherwise would be.

PRIZE LIST. SHEEP. MERINO. Judges —Messrs Dunford, Stitt, and Phillips. Class 1, for the best ram above eighteen months old. First prize and highly commended, M. J. Browne, shorn November 7th, bred by exhibitor; second, Gould and Cameron, shorn December Bth, 1881; highly commended, M. J. Browne, shorn November 7th, bred by exhibitor. Class 2, for the best ram under eighteen months old. First prize, VV. Lyttelton, lambed August, bred by exhibitor; second, C. J. Harper, lambed September 15th. Class 3, for the best ewe above eighteen months old. First prize, W. Lyttelton, shorn November, 1881, bred by exhibitor; second, O. G. Hawdon, shorn December Ist 1881. Class 4, for the best ewe under eighteen months old. First prize, W. Lyttelton, lambed September, bred by exhibitor ; second, O. G. Hawdon, lambed September 15th, 1881. D. Oliver gave L2 2s for the host five merino ewes under eighteen months bid, that have never been housed, clothed, or hand fed. Hirst prize, W. Lyttelton ; second, Gould and Cameron. C. G. Hawdon gave L 3 3s for the best five merino ewes under eighteen months old, that have never been housed, clothed, or hand fed. First prize, 0. J. Harper.

' New Zealand Loan and Mercantile 1 Agency Company gave a piece d|) plate, value L 3 3s, for the best pen of five i | merino rams under eighteen months? old. 11 First prize, 0. J. Harper, lambed Septem- ’ ber, bred by exhibitor.' , ' ' President’s prize—E. S. Coster gave a ; piece of plate, value L 5 ss, for the best four merino ewes of any age. W. Lyttelton, bred by exhibitor.

LINCOLN. Judges—Messrs H. J. Hall, W. Marcroft, and P. C. Threlkeld. 31ass 5, for the best ram above eighteen months old. First and second prizes, Dudley and Northey, shorn December 28th, 1881, bred by Cartwright, England. Class 6, for the best ram under eighteen months old. First and second prizes, Dudley and Northey, lambed September, bred by C T Dudley C'ass 7, for the best ewe above eighteen months old. First and second prizes, Dudley and Northey, shorn November, 1881, bred by C T Dudley Class 8, for the best ewe under eighteen months old. First and second prizes, Dudley and Northey, lambed September, bred by C T Dudley LEICESTER. Judges—Messrs Threlkeld and Hall. Class 9, for the best ram above eighteen months old. First prize, J Bonifant, shorn November, 1881, bred by T P Russell, Timaru; second, W Marcroft ; commended, T Taylor, shorn November, 1881, bred by W Boag Class 10, for the best ram under eighteen months old. First prize, second, and commanded, W Marcroft Class 11, for the best ewe above eighteen months old. First and second prizes, J Bonifant, shorn November, 1881, bred by Gregg, of Riccarton; commended, J Bonifant, shorn November, 1881, bred by J T Ford . Class 12, for the beat ewe under eighteen months old. First prize, Wilkin and Carter, lambed September; second and commended, J Bonifant, bred by J T Ford ROMNEY MARSH. Judges—Messrs Hall, Threlkeld, and Marcroft. Class 15, for the best ewe above eighteen months. First and second prizes, Wilkin and Carter, shorn November Class 16, for the beat ewe under eighteen months. First and second prizes, Wilkin and Carter, lambed September Dr Trevor gave £2 2s for the best five merino ewes, with crossbred lambs at foot, ewes and lambs to be taken into consideration. First prize, Wilkin and Carter Matson, Cox and Co gave £2 12s 6d for the best five ewes or wethers under eighteen months old, the progeny of merino ewes and longwool rams of any pure breed (to be specified). First prize, T Clephano, the progeny cf Leicester and Lincoln rams.

James Jamieson gave £1 Is for the best crossbred sheep (first cross), ewe or wether, four-tooth, bred from merino dwe. First prize, James Jamieson, crossbred wether, shorn November.4th, 1881 FAT SHEEP. Judges—Messrs H. J. Hall, W. Marcroft, and P. C. Threlkeld. Class 17, for the best five crossbred wethers, of any age, for butchfers’ purposes. First prize, W Saunders; second, Wilkin and Carter; commended, J Bonifant Class 18, for the best five merino wethers. First prize, W Saunders; second, Gould and Cameron LAMBS, FOR BUTCHERS’ PURPOSES. Class 19, for the best ten fat lambs, any breed. First prize, Wilkin and Carter; 2nd, James Tasker CATTLE (Imported or otherwise). SHORTHORNS. Judges—Messrs J. Boag, J. Fergusson, and A. Dawson. Class 1, for the best bull of any age. First prize, R Anderson, Lord Napier, calved January 9th, 1880 ; second, W Marcroft, red and white bull, calved September 28th, 1881 Class 2, for the best cow of any age. First prize, Dudley and Northey, Daphne; second, O. Digby, Young Creamy; highly commended and commended, W Marcroft, Nellie Gwynne and Oxford Countess ANY OTHER BREED. Class 3, for the best bull of any age. First prize, James Reid, of Timaru, Ayrshire bull, 2yrs; highly commended, O Digby, Ayrshire bull Class 4, for the best cow of any age. Second prize, W Marcroft, Strawberry, in calf/to Alvie’s Duke Class 5, for the best milch row of any ago or breed, in full profit; M Scott, of Tinwald, gave a prize of LI Is in addition to the Association's prize. First prize, Wilkin and Carter; second, James Tasker, Peggy ; highly commended, Dudley and Northey, Tottie Georgiene; commended, W J Silcock, Daisy The directors of the Ashburton Cheese and Batter Factory gave a prize of L 3 3s for the three best cows, of any age or breed, most suitable for dairy purposes, in milk or springing, the bona fide property of one owner. First prize, R Anderson

S Mullins gave LI Is for the beat two-year-old heifer, any breed. First prize, J C Bell, roan heifer, calved October let, 1880 Class 7, for the best fat cow or heifer. First prize, Wilkin and Carter; second, O Digby HORSES. (Imported or otherwise.) DRAUGHT HORSES. Judges—Messrs W. B. Campbell, J. Walls, and Rose. Class 1, for the best entire horse of any age. First prize, E Thomas, Commander; second, R Matthews, Strathmo e Class 2, for the best mare in foal, or with foal at foot. First prize, John Gilmour, grey mare Je m ; second, Gould and Cameron, brown mare, Nelly, with foal at foot; highly commended, W Stoddart, Grace ; commended, W L Orr, bay mare, by Major, with foal at foot by Governor

Class 3, for the best dry mare of any age. First prize, John Gilmour, bay mare Polly ; second, W Stoddart, Pride ; commended, T McDowell, bay mare, Maggie, by Prince Charlie W Innes gave L2 2s for the beat draught mare, to be shown with two of her progeny. First prize, W Stoddart, Gyp TuckerandßestellgaveL2 2s for the best mare or gelding suitable for a carrier’s cart (up to 30cwt). First prize, A Spicer, Tom Class 4, for the best filly foaled since July Ist, jlBBo. First prize, W Stoddart, by Sir Colin Campbell; second, W Harris ; commended, T Taylor, Nell, by Prince Royal Class 5, for the best filly foaled since July Ist, 1880. Two firs: prizes, G Hamilton, bay filly, Countess, by Heather Jock T Taylor gave LI Is for the best yearling draught filly. First prize, R Matthews, chestnut filly, foaled November 18th, 1881 ; second, John Gilmour, bay filly, Jenny Lind Class 6, for the best gelding of any age. First prize, R Miller, Duke ; second, John Gilmour, Glen, by Glenroy ; highly commended, W Jamieson, Glen, by Glenroy ; commended, Hugh Smith, Prince, 4yrs, by Pretender Class 7, for the best colt foaled since July Ist, 1879. First prize, John Gilmour, grey colt, Charlie, by Glenroy; second, John Gilmour, grey colt, Jock Class 8, for the best colt foaled since July Ist, 1880. First prize, W Stoddart, by Prince Royal; second, John Gilmour, bay colt Wallace, ; highly commended, John Shearer, bay colt, by Victor ; commended, R Miller, chestnut colt, by Victor T Taylor gives LI Is for the best yeae-

RMatfopwlfr bay coljtf'y>ale<Jgovember 17th, g leJt foal on the grotfed. First prize, M apfoidittta. foal by Muir Lad OjJiss 9, TQr thp * best team of two horses (either mares or geldings) of any age, in regular work, Jide properly of Exhibitor, to oe shown in harness. First prize, F. Bennison , Class 10, for the best team of three horses (same conditions). In ■'addition to the Association’s prize for this class, John Gilmour gave a special prize - of LH 2s. First prize, Hugh Johnston S Wood gave L2 2s for the best two-year-old colt or filly by Heather Jock. First prize, G. Hamilton, bay filly, Countess ; second, D Williamson, Jock John McKullar gave L2 for the best two-year-old colt or filly by Victor. First prize, John Shearer, bay colt, foaled November, 1880; highly commended, Robert Miller BLOODSTOCK. Judges—Messrs Polhill and F. C. Tabart. Class 11, for the best entire horse of any age. First prize, Max Friedlander, bay horse Veno ; second, E Herring (Alford station), Tribune, byTraducer Class 12, for the best brood mare in foal or with foal at foot. First prize, S. Mullins, Minnie, with foal at foot by Young Knottingly

CARRIAGE HORSES. Class 13, for the best entire horse of any age. First prize, Wilkin and Carter, Dexter, by Talisman ; second, Matson, Cox and Co, Oakgrove (America trotter), by Irvington Class 14, for the best brood mare in foal, or with foal at foot. First prize, Max Friedlander, black mare Hatred, with foal at foot by Veno ; second, Mark Scott, bay mare Jessie, with feal at foot, by Young Knottingly Class 15, for the best dry mare or gelding. First prize, George Jameson, Eclipse, by Young Priam Orr and Co gave L2 2s for the best two-year-old carriage colt or filly. First prize, R Miller, bay gelding, by Tribune; second, John Orr, chestnut filly,, by Admiral s

Class 17, for the beat buggy horse) to be shown in harness, and driven in the presence of the judges. First prize, Roberts and Winter, chestnut mare, Countess; second, Matson, Cox and Co, roan mare, Sally Brass; highly commended, Dudley and Northey, black mare, Gipsy, by Barbarian, ( •.; -'! / . ' HACKNEYS. Class 18, for the best brood mare in foal, or with foal at foot. First prize,W Innis, Maggie, with foal at foot by Tribune ; second, Henry Milner, Fann, imported from Victoria, by Traitor Class 19, for the best roadster or hack (mare or gelding) up to 14 stone weight. First prize, ■ Geo Gaul, bay : gelding, Tommy; second, J F Tickell, brown gelding. Jimmy ; commended, J Polhill, chestnut gelding, Baronet, 6 years • Class 20, lor the best'roadster dr hack (mare or gelding) fit to carry not less than 10 stone Weight. First Dicken, Ned, by Defamer ; second, J R Hart, Pirate,. 5 years, by Messenger, dam Peeress ; commended, G Gaukrodger 0 lass ,21; for the best ladies’ hack (mafe or gelding) which has been thoroughly broken in as a lady’s hack ; to be shown in side saddle and ridden ; in addition to the Association’s prize for this class, Mr John Carter gave a prize of L2 2s, and Mr W Anderson a lady’s whip for the rider. First prize, Mark" Scott, brown mare, Manilla; second, R Mclntyre, brown mare, Granny; commended, E Cookson, chestnut gelding, Waipate, by Ham, bred by Mr Sfudholmei Class 22, for the best cob (mare or geldding) not exceeding 14£ hands high. First prize, Wjlkin and Carter,, bay, mare, Topsy ; second,' M Nealas, grey cob, Rocket, , . s- -i • ■>'

HUNTERS. Class 23, for the best hunter, to be ridden previous to examination. In addition to the Association’s prize for this class, Mr M Nealas gave a pair of riding boots, value L 3 3s, for the owner of the horse that wins the hunter’s prize. First prize, Roberts and Winter, chestnut gelding,' Charlie,; second, s John.. Oebbett, brown horse, Captain ; commended, Max Friedlander, ■ grey geldingj Lyndh drat PONIES. Class 25, for the best brood mare, in foal or with foal at foot, not exceeding 13 hands. First prize, Hugh Rainey, mare, with foal at foot Class 26, for the best boy’s pony, mare or gelding, not above 13 hands, and thoroughly quiet to ride* rto be shown in saddle and to be ridden by a boy or girl. First prize, Wilkin and Carter, bay ppny Selim ; second, W L Orr, bay gelding, Dickey ; highly commended, Master Joe Friedlander, bay pony Tinno Ladies’ leaping match. First prize, Miss Mary Millar, on Black Bess PIGS. Judges—Messrs G Gilmour,, W Hartnell, W J G Bluett Class 1, for the best Berkshire boar. First and second prize and commended, O Digby, by Gladstone* dam Sweet Briar, bred by W B Clarkson Class 2, for the best Berkshire sow. First prize, O Digby, Maritana, by Gladstone ; second and commended, O Digby, by Gladstone Henry Hampton gave LI Is, for the best boar of any breed under twelve months old. First and second prize, O Digby, by Gladstone, bred by W B Clarkson ; commended, Wilkin and Carter Class 4, for the best breeding sow of any age or breed other than Berkshire. First prize, T N Digby 5 second, G T Smith ; special, J Sm ill Class 6, for the best pen of three porkers under six months old. First prize, O Digby ; second, Wilkin and Carter ; highly commended, T N Digby

DOGS. Judges—Messrs Manson and McKenzie Class 1, for the best smooth-coated collie sheep dog. First, prize, 11 W Strouts, Scamp ; second, J Foreman, Flo ; commended, J T Toppin, Jess Class 2, for the best rough-coated collie sheep dog. First prize, A Jackson, Rob ; second, S Mullins, Laddie ; highly commended, O Digby, Prince POULTRY. (To be shown in pens of two, male and fepoale, except where ' otherwise specified. Exhibitors must find their own pens) Judges—Messrs J'H Wood and S Saunders Class 1, for the best Dorking fowls. First prize, W J Silcock Class 2, for the best Brahma Pootra fowls. First prize, G T Smith ; second, Master Ernest Tasker Class 3, for the best game fowls of any breed. In addition to the Association’s prize for this class, W EL Gundry gave a prize ot LI Is. First prize, Wilkin and Carter Class 4, for the best Spanish fowls. Highly commended, Mrs McConnell Class 5, for the best Polish fowls. First prize, G T Smith ; second, J Permain Class G, for the best Bantams of any description. First prize, E Parkin Class 7, for the best Hamburg fowls. First prize, T M Jones; second, J Permain Class 8, for the best Barn-door fowls. First prize, O Digby D Williamson gave a box of tea for the best pair of fowls for culinary purposes, to be dressed ready for cooking. First prize, Mrs Crosby Class 9, for the best Aylesbury ducks. Second prize, J M Smith Class' 10, for the best Rouen ducks. First prize, J M Smith ; second, J M Smith Class 11, for the best ducks of any other breed. First prize, Mrs Hill ; second, O Digby Clara 12, for the best pen of two geeae.

First pr'ze, O Digby ; second, Wilkin and Carter Class 13, for the best pen of two turkeys. First prize, Wilkin and Carter; second, W Simpson. IMPLEMENTS. Judges—MessrsJ. Grigg, H. W. Parsons, and C. Dudley. Class 1, for the best three-furrow plough. First prize, P and D Duncan, L 23 7s 6d Class 3, for the best double-furrow lever plough. First prize, P and D Duncan, with shifting lever, LlB 5s ; second, P and D Duncan, with swivel skeaths, Ll 7 15a; highly commended, Reid and Gray, plough with circular coulters, Ll 7 13s, with diggers L 5 extra Glass 4, for the best single-furrow plough. First prize, P and D Duncan, LlO 5s

Class 5, for the best plough with subsoiler . combined. First prize, P and D Duncan, L 22 5s Class 6, for the best grubber or scarifier. First prize, Reid and Gray, seven-tined field grubber, L 1 8; highly commended, P and D Duncan, nine tines, Ll 6 5s Class 7, for the best set of heavy harrows. First prize, James Little, fiveleaved diamond harrows, with extra tyee, LlO ; second, P and D Duncan, fourleaved, L 6 5s Class 8, for the best set of light harrows. First prize, Poyntz and Co., one set of Haxton and Beattie’s harrows, 20ft wide, Lll 10s ; second, James Little, sixleaved diamond harrows, with extra tree, LlO

Class 9, for the best set chain harrows. First prize, James Little, chain harrows, with two divisions and two rows of tines, 12ft wide, L 8 10a ; second P and D Duncan

Class 10, for the best broadcast grain or seed sowing machine. First prize, P and D. Duncan, broadcast sower, L 24 ;■ canisters, extra, L 4 ; chain harrows, extra,<L6

Class 11, for the beat drill for com or. seeds. First prize, Andrews add Beaven, Anglo-American, seventeen coulters, L 42, grass seed box L 5 extra, turnip drilling apparatus L 3 extra ; second, Reid and Gray, seventeen coulters, with turnip canisters and broadcast see 1 box, for gram or grass, LSO Class 12, for the best field roller. First prize, P and D Duncan, roller, LlB |>s, grass seed sowing attachment L 7 extra, turnip and rape attachment L 4 extra, chain harrows L 4 extra, seat 15s extra Class 13, for the best clod crusher. First prize, PandD Duncan, clod crusher, L2O 15s, grass seed-sowing attachment L 7 extra, turnip and rape-sowing attachment L 4 extra, chain harrows L 4 extra, seat 15a extra; second, Reid and Gray, Bft x 26in, L2O, with turnip canisters L 5 extra, with chain harrows L 4 10s extra . _ Class 14, fcr the best mowing mach|ne. First prize, Reid and Gray, combined reaper and rawer, L 32 Class 15, for the best stripper adapted for stripping rye-grass. First prize, P and D Duncan, L 23 15s Class 17, for the best horse rake. First prize, Reid and Gray, Ll 4. Class 18, for the best horse hoe. First prize, W. Norrish, with mould board complete, L 4 10a ; second, James hoe with moulding plough combined, L 6; highly commended, P and D Duncan, L 4 2s 6d Class 19, for the best potato digger. First prize, Kol.ey Bros, L 22 10s / Class 20, for the best farm dray. First prize, Reid and Gray, Sin axle and hay frame, L 23 ; second, Reid and Gray, 2£in axle and hay frame, L2l; highly commended, G Booth and Sons, Sin axle, L2l, frame extra, made by the exhibitors Class 21, for the best farm cart. First prize, G Booth and Sons, L 23, frame extra, made by exhibitor ; second, P; and D Duncan, L 23 10s, frame LI 10s extra Glass 22, for the best town carrier’s cart, weight to be affixed to the exhibit. First prize, P and D Duncan, cwt, L 36

Class 23, for the best Whitechapel cart of New Zealand manufacture. First prize, Baker and Brown; second, Elz Bros

Class 24, for the best single buggyjof New Zealand manufacture. First prize, Steel Bros, Albert buggy, LSO ; second, Baker and Brown _ ■'» Class 25, for the best set of whippletrees for three horses. First prize, Reid and Gray, LI 10s ; second, P and D Duncan, LI 15s. Class 26, for the best set of tackle for four horses. First prize, Reid and Gray, with trees comolete, L 4 ; second, P and D Duncan, whippletreos and tackle, with wire rope, L 4 10s Class 27, for the best chaffcutter, with horse power attached. First prize, Andrews and Beaven, two-horse gear complete, L 22, and three-knife I3in Canterbury chaffcutter, with riddle and fly-ugh eel cover, Ll 9 15s PRODUCE. i. Judges : Messrs J. Orr, D. Williamson, and A. Harrison. Class 1, for the best 31b fresh butter, without salt or prints. First prize, JII Smith; second, Mrs O’Brien, Grove Farm ; highly commended, Mrs Patterson, jun _ T Class 2, for the best display of fancy butter, not less than 21b. First prize, .Mrs Wallace ; second, Mrs J 0 Bell; highly commended, Mrs G. Gilmour .'J Class 3, for the best keg of salted butter, fit for exportation, not loss than 281 b; butter to have been salted not less thhn thirty days previous to the Show. Firit prize, J. Small Class 4, for the beat colonial cheese bf not less than 151 b. Highly commended, G Gilmour

Class 5, for the best side of New Zealand cured bacon (smoked). First prize, J W Stringfellow Class 6, for the best side of New Zealand cured bacon funsmoked). First prize, J W Stringfellow ; second, James Croy : commended, T. N. Digby Class 7, for the best two hams (smoked), First prize, J W Stringfellow Class 8, for the best two hams (unsmokei). First prize, W J Silcockf; commended, James Croy Friedlander Bros gave L 3 3s for the best collection of dairy produce, including hams and bacon. First prize, G Gilmour i Class 11, for the best three loaves ef bread. Highly commended, T Taylor T Quill gave LI Is for the best round of corned beef. First prize, G J Martin NEW ZEALAND MANUFACTURES AND PRODUCE. Judges—Messrs J. P. Jameson, R. Sutherland, and A. Orr. Class 1, for the beat five gallons of ale (imported hops allowed). First prize, Lion Brewery Company ; second, Moore • and Sons Class 2, for the beat five gallons of porter, in all respects same conditions as ale (coloring matter allowed). First a 'd second prize, Lion Brewery Company Glass 5, for the best collection of New Zealand manufactured woollen goods. First prize, Kaiapoi Woollen Factory Class 6, for the best collection of Colonial made boots. First prize, T Chambers Class 7, for the best collection of fire day goods. Highly commended, Austin, Kirk and Co Class 8, for the best drain pipes. Commended, Austin, Kirk and Co Class 9, for the best mould candles, not less than 61b. Highly commended, Smithson | Class 10, for the best yellow soap, not less than 561 b, date of manufacture to be affixed First prize, Smithson, L 24 .per ton. J Grigg gave L 4 4s for the best, and L2 2s for the second beat of the most recent improvements in labor-saving ■ agricultural implements or appliances First prize, G Booth and Sons, 12fc disc bar-

row; second, Andrewsandßeaven, screw ' " press 'with Canterbury chaffcutter ’ EXTRA EXHIBITS. W J Silcock, white Dorkings, first prize _ Master H Tasker, white Dorkings, • second prize , , . ; ;WJ Silcock, buff Coohms, highly commended : Mrs W H Zouch, Langshan fowls, J Tucker, Ayrshire heifer, ten months old,.by Prince Imperial, commended ■ James Beid, Ayrshire heifer, yearlong* highly commended _ j James Reid, Ayrshire heifer, two years, first prize . . , ■ O. Digby, Ayrshire heifer, Josephine, two years, by Prince Imperial, second prize _; W Wilson, collection of seeds, highly commended . Ashburton Cheese and Butter Factory Company, Limited, assortment of cheese, highly commended • New Zealand Pickle Preserving Company, assortment of pickles, highly commended W Da?is, suite bedroom furniture, highly commended , J Meech, suite dining-room furniture, first prize :J, Meech, suite drawing-room furniture, first prize ..F T Mayo, bone dust, highly commended JR Steel, assortment of horse shoes, highly commended Moore and Sons, bottled ale, highly commended ■ Moore and - Sons, bottled stoui, highly . commended T* Crompton, cooking ranges, first prize T‘Crompton, wrought iron pig troughs, first prize ,', early potatoes, highly com- ' mended John Anderson, traction engine, combine, and elevator, highly commended ' Andrews and Beaven, portable chaff . cutter,' 12-inch mouth, three knives - ' fitted with riddles, elevators, and screw * press,; with adjustable brake, L 65, second prize G Booth and' Sons, Carlisle iron windmill, 10 feet diameter, LlB, highly commended ‘ Reid and Gray, No 3 chaff cutter, Ll2, highly commended. ■ Reid and Gray, No 2 chaff cutter, Ll 6, commended ' ( * Reid and Gray, extra heavy 2 furrow plough for stony land, L 23, with improved" ? yoke for 3,4, 6or 6 horses, LI 16s extra, . commended l > P and D Duncan, extra heavy plough, commended . : Steel Bros, 1 double seated buggy, X 52 10s, highly commended Elz Bros, 1 double seated American''’ waggon, with executive lock, shafts, and lamps, L 45, highly commended Elz ■ Bros, commercial double seated: r buggy, with shafts, lamps, and executive lock, L4B, highly commended Elz Bros, commercial double seated buggy, with executive lock, pole, shafts ■ and lamps complete, highly commended

' THE DINNER. : r Last evening about eighty gentlemen ~,'aajfc down to a very excellent dinner, provided by Mr . Quill, at tho Commercial , Hotels Mr E. S. Coster, president of the Association, occupied the chair, and was - supported by. Mr. Ivess, M.H. R., and Mr George*Jameson, secretary, the vice-chair/ being occupied by Mr C. Percy Cox, vicepresident, and Mr T. Bullock, J.P.. After ample justice had been done to the Very recherche spread, which include 1 all the delicacies of the season, the toast of “ The Queen,’’ “ Prince and Princess of * ! Wales,” and “ The Acting-Governor,” were heartily drunk. Mr 0. W. .Purnell proposed “The General Assembly of New Zealand,” coupled with the names of Mr E.;6. Wright, member for Ashburton, and Mr Joseph Ivess, member for Wakanui. He regretted the unavoidable absence of ‘Mr '■’Wwight, who had always taken a Very active part in matters connected with agricultural pursuits. The toast was lenthusiastically drimk. Mr Ivess said that, owing to thein- ■ creased system of franchise they now enjoyed would cause a greater public interest to be taken in reference to the wdrkiog of the Assembly, especially when so many'* millions of money were being spent on public works. He was not, however, going to go into matters of debate, such as a toast of this kind was likely to elicitate. He regretted that Mr Wright was not present, as he felt sure that it would have given him great pleasure to respond to the toast. He thought that the present members of the Assembly were likely, to prove of great service to the ’ colony, »s they bad the best interests of the people at heart. (Hear, hear.) f ; Song: Mr A. Harrison—“ The Village ' Blacksmith.”

Mr 0. P. Cox proposed “The County Council,” coupled with the names; of ' Messrs Bullock and Julian Jackson. He bad very great pleasiire in giving the, toast, as the Council, although fortunate in getting a large sum of money at their disposal, in their’ 1 ehvly ' days of existence, had ezpend«d t it’very wisely and most economically in. the extensive nature of the works, including water-races and bridges which had (J been carried but by the Council. Thp, County was indeed fortunate in obtaining: • a Council composed of such thorough business men. (Hear, hear.) Mr Bullock responded, fie said that • the Council had endeavored to spend their money as judiciously as they possibly, could. As a.matter of fact 600 miles of water-races bad been made in the different parts of the County. Not only bad the races been made on the plains without

. raising any loan, but the Borough had . been endowed wHh an excellent water aupply at a email cost. He thought that , every farmer should plant parts of his : paddocks with more trees, and this would be found of great benefit. He hoped that the 200 per cent, of the land fund would be returned to the County, as the funds of the Council were no w at a very low ebb. He referred to. the Bangitata road bridge ‘ which,wopld shortly bo completed, and would he found to be of gnat service dor driving cattle and stock from the south. Song, Mr Brown—“ The Milking Pail." Mr, Bullock proposed “The Borough ‘Council of Ashburton.” He was spre that this body had the best interests of the Borough at heart, and the money trey had hyd at their* disposal was expended with care. He alluded to the fact! of other Boroughs having been rated for four times as much as the rates of the Ashburton burgesses now paid. Ho would couple the toast with the names of Crs Harrison, Friedlander, Nelson, and His Worship the Mayor. The latter, he was sorry to see,

was not present. 1 Messrs Harrison, Friedlander, and Ifelgon.duly. responded to the toast. Mr jR. , Bird ‘also , responded on being called , upon. Song, Mr A. Harrison—“ Simon the , Cellarer.” Mr p. W. Purnell proposed “The ' President, Mr E. S. Coster, and theVlce- ' ’President, 1 Mr, C. P. Cox.” , Both tlfese ■/- deeply interested in agri- , cultural phwuita, rand more particularly ' - they had done a great deal for the A. and P. Association. He was greatly pleased, with that day’s Show, which was a most ■ ' ’creditable orie, particularly with regard to - the locally-made exhibits, which excelled ' ;i tK , of older places than Ashburton I .’’ : Ho might throw out a suggestion, and , . ‘ that was lhat he thought the Hortiiul- ' 1 iurdlSociety should he induced to hold a on the same day and the T < ''‘'game ground as the Show was held. p3h - , had yery. much pleasure in proposing

“The A. and P. Association, coupLd with the names of Messrs Crater and Cox. ” The toast was heartily drunk. Mr Coster said he was very pleased with the way in which his name had been coupled with the toast. He regretted that he could not attend so many meetings of the Association as he ought, owing to the distance he lived from town. The Show of that day was the best that had yet been held. The entries were larger than last year, and whilst other districts in Canterbury had shown a falling-off in the’- entries for theit respective shows, Ashburton had shown an opposite result. The gate money, also, represented ATT increase in the attendance of more, than 300 persons over last year, and this was a better result than other districts had chronicled. He considered that ih a few years a scheme of irrigation would be initiated for the benefit of in addition to their present water supply . He briefly alluded to the County Council, and the work they had done foil the benefit of the County. Mr Cox said the members of the Association had worked hard to make the Show a success. They wanted more farmers to 1 take an interest in the Show, and' if such were the case, he felt sure that every year their Show would be more successful. He thanked them for coupling his name with the toast. Mr Wilkinson said that the mercantile interests’of Ashburton were in such good fignds that they were Bound to succeed." to the: benefits which-would, result from the Woollen and the Cheese and Butter Factories which had lately been instituted in the town and district of Ashburton. He would couple the names of Messrs Revans and Cox with the toast.

Mr Cox said that the mercantile interests were inseparably bound up with farming matters, and the splendid exhibitions of implements which were witnessed at to-day’s Show was sufficient to convince anyone of the very great strides that were "made in labor-saving machinery, now brought within the reach of every farmer through the channels of English and American mercantile houses. He would allude to the very great benefit which wpuld. result from the making, of the West Coast railway, which, when completed, would bring the products of each side to a ready market. Mr Revans alluded to the very large figures which the commerce of New ZeaJand iad, lately shown, aftd- its financial ■pdfjiiibn was of the best description. Mr John Carter proposed “The Judges,” coupled with the names of Messrs John Rennie, of Doyleston, and M. Stitt, of Winchmore. Mr Rennie said it gave him great pleasure in responding to the toast. A. judge’s 'duty Was rather a difficult one/ arid he was glad to hear that their decisions had given great satisfaction, He was glad to 'see that Ashburton was in such a prosperous condition. Mr Stitt said the Show of to-day was in many respects superior to that of Christchurch. The hacks were far superior to those of the. Christchurch Show., * 'Song : Mr Lane—“ The Men of Merry England.” Mr W. H. Zouch proposed “The Successful Competitors,” coupled with the names of Messrs R. Saddler, Smith, and Donald Cameron.

Mr S. Smith responded, and said that he represented Mr Marcroft, who, he was glad to find, was a successful exhibitor at the Show of to-day. The Rev. E. A. Scott proposed “The i'Hhsufcoessful Competitors;”Song : Mr Jackson—“ Wild Irishman.” Mr J. C. Bell proposed -the “Learned professions,” coupled with the names of Mr Parnell and the’ Rev. A. E. Scott. Both gentlemen responded. Mr Ivess proposed “ The Agricultural and Pastoral interests,” coupled with the names of Messrs Andrew Dawson and J. Carter. .MrCarter responded. He .was sorry Mr Dawson was not present. He was glad to see that their Show had been so great a success at this year’s Show. This was due to the energy of a certain gentleman. He thanked them for the toast.

Mr R. Friedlanderproposed the “Local industries,” coupled with the name of Mr Pilhrow. The samples which were exhibited' at that day’s Show, viz., the chbese, were sufficient to convince them that their latest industry would be a great addition to the welfare of the County. The Woollen Factory was also an established fact, and the machinery would be out from England shortly. The gentleman whose name he had coupled with the toast was a most energetic advocate of local industries, and he (Mr Friedlander) had known him for the last fifteen years. Mr Pilbrow responded. He was glad to see the great strides the district of Ashburton had made in the last few years, in comparison with Temuka. He referred to the great damage that had been done to ; Ruining owing to so many crops of wheat straw being taken from ( the land, year after year. He himself had applied through Mr Wakefield, then district mem;bet,, £or a bonus for linseedoil, and he believed he was the first to encourage the growth of linseed. ■ His own district had been very backward in the' matter. In the? .North Island there were two mills already manufacturing oil. ' ' The President, in a most eulogistic Speech, proposed “ The Secretary, Mr Jameson. ” . The toast was drunk very heartily. Mr Jameson responded, and said he had. great pleasure in working with the members of the Committee.

The toasts of “The Press,” “The Ladies,” and “The Host,” brought a very pleasant evening to a close.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18821124.2.7

Bibliographic details

THE SHOW., Ashburton Guardian, Volume IV, Issue 801, 24 November 1882

Word Count
6,848

THE SHOW. Ashburton Guardian, Volume IV, Issue 801, 24 November 1882

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