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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. MONDAY, JULY 3, 1882.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 4.40 p. m. j

Hunt Club.—The hounds will meet at the Gasworks on Saturday, at 2 p.m.

Business Mkm.—Mr Lancaster’s announcement elsewhere will be found of interest to “ Free Traders.” Timaru Wreck Relief Fund.—Subscriptions in aid of the above fund will be received at the local banks and also at the Town Clerk’s office up to the 31st July. Westerfield Mill —lt will be observed from our advertising columns that Messrs Matson, Cox and Co. are about to dispose of the above well-known mill, together with stock-in-trade, book debts, plant, etc.

Old Men's Home. —The master of the Ashburton Home asks us to say that ho is desirous of obtaining a piano for the use of the institution, and will be thankful to receive donations towards a fund for the purpose. New Method of Collecting in Churches. A new method of collection has been adopted in some of the Presbyterian Churches in America, which may be worth imitation. Small boxes, with a slit in the top and glass in the sides, are fastened to the backs of pews. Then, before the sermon, the pastor steps to the desk, and after repeating I. Cor. xvi. 2, “ Upon the first day of the week let every one of yon lay by him in store, as God has prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come,” says, “ Let us further worship God by contributing to his service.” Then is heard all over the house the dropping of the change into the boxes. It requires but a minute of time, and the plan is pronounced most successful.

Captain Burnaby. —As far as money goes (and it does not go very far with some people), Colonel Burnaby made a good thing out of his balonn voyage. His total expenses, including hire of the balloon and transport charges, were a trifle over LBO. For his little book Sampson Low and Co. gave him a cheque for L 250. He wrote it in a couple of days, working six hours a day. But then ho had to go up in the balloon as a preliminary, and that very nearly settled all subsequent proceedure by landing him down the Channel at the gate of the Atlantic. Moreover, Colonel Burnaby has always been uncommonly well paid. For bis “Ride to Khiva” he received only LSOO. For the “ Ride through Asia Minor ” he received a cheque for L 2.500 and is yet in receipt of occasional small cheques on account of his interest in the copyright.

The Dog and the Tkain. —Just as the train was leaving Hakaia for the north the other morning, a black collie dog sud denly made his appearance on the platform, having followed his master, who was a passenger by the train, and despite the latter’s commands to “go away home,” and so forth, the dog evinced a decided desire to board the train, which moved away just as the animal was about to jump up. When the train reached the bridgs, a quarter of a mile away, the dog was following; his master, who was standing upon a carriage platform, still endeavoring to make him go back but in vain. The bridgekeeper seeing the dog ordered back, shut the gate, and the animal took to the water, swimming right across the river. On arriving at the opposite side, the dog was astonished to find that the train had considerably “ improved its lead,” and concluding the pace was too hot for him, went back with his tail between his legs. Ho evidently fancied the train had taken a mean advantage of him.

Marriage with Deceased Wives’ Sisters. —The people who want to marry their sisters-in-law, the Home Neivs tells us, can stan 1 it no longer. They have colonial practice with them ; they have the Queen with them, and all the royal family. They have the Archbishop of C mterbury with them. With them, also, are the leaders of both Houses of the Legislature. The House of Commons has repeatedly passed their Bill ; yetsisters-in-lawstill remain sisters-in-law, and are incapable of conversion into wives. It is intolerable. So the the brothers-in-law are called upon to rise in their strength next month, and by a monster meeting demonstrate against the monstrosity. It is rather difficult to believe that the fierce democracy of the Great City will rise with a growl for the purpose of legalising matches between widowers and their deceased wives’ sisters ; but certainly the case of the marriage reformers is very bard. They have expected to pass their measure any time this twelve years, and at the end of every session they find themselves where they were.

The Organ Egljp.-ed. —Peoide (says a home paper) are asking what is this now instrument that Mr Baillie Hamilton has put before the world. Those who hoard it at Harrow, and, above all, those who have heard it played on with greater freedom in its factory, see there has been devised an instrument which provides greater variety of effect and greater volume and power of sound than an ordinary pipe organ of twice its size. There is to be, it appears, an equal comparative reduction in cost. Consequently, in these days of economy in space and in outlay, it would appear that this new instrument will supply an acknowledged void—provided it is found, on further public trial, to fulfil the apparently justified anticipations of its inventor. It was noticed at Harrow that it possesses distinctly new and pleasing characters of sounds, which recalled to the hearer, with strange fidelity, many of the familiar tones at once of the pipe organ, of the softer wind instruments, and even of the human voice ilself. The sound is produced, wo believe, by wind that produces the gEolian character by the vibration of “ free” reeds, connected together in triplets, and cunningly balanced by wire spirals. The human-like character is ad led by the means of a sounding-box of sma'l dimensions into which the windy vibrations pass, and which performs, and performs successfully, the corresponding functions of the thoracic cavities of the human body.

The Parliamentary Jaunt. —The visit of the Speaker and members of both H ousea of the Legislature to the Exliibition took place on Saturday. The Hinemoa and Penguin got into Lyttelton bright and early on Saturday morning, and about 1.30 the Parliamentary visitors proceeded to Addington by special train. They were met at the Exhibition gates by “ the showmen”—as an honorable member called them in the House the other day—the Mayor and members of the City Council. The Mayor did the welcoming, and M. Joubert the show business. Having rambled all round the building, the visitors were taken to the Art Gallery, where a nice collation enabled them to fortify the inner men. M. Joubert occupiied the chair, and on his right sat the Piimato, on his left Sir Maurice O’Korke (Speaker of the House of Representatives) and the Hon. Mr Scotland. The members of the Ministry were “ conspicuous etc., etc.”—which occasioned considerable regret. 'J ho leader of the Opposition put in an appearance, however, and with him Messrs Joubert and Twopeny bad to be satisfied. Ihe lunch having disappeared, M. Joubert proposed in glowing terms the health of “her upon whom the sun never sets —the most gracious and beloved Victoria, Queen of England and Empress of India.” Much enthusiasm, and “God Save the Queen ” by the Burnham drum and fife bind ! “ The Prince of Wales and Royal Family,” “ The Governor,” “The Ministry,” “Our Guests,” “His Worship the Mayor and Corporation of C.iristchurch,” “ The Promoters ” (proposed by the Mayor of Christchurch, who dilated in glowing terms on the advantages conferred on the colony by the New Zealand Exhibition), and several others. The luncheon was a great success.

Tenders. —The County Council invite tenders for work. Journalistic. The Nelson Colonist appeared as a penny paper on Saturday.

Prohibition Orders. —A number of orders restraining publicans from supplying drink to animated beer-barrels have lately been granted by the Auckland magistrates.

Ashburton Horticultural Society.— The ordinary monthly meeting of the above will be held at Mr H. M. Jones’ upper room to-morrow evening at eight o’clock. The business will be the consideration of holding a Spring Show, and the reading of a paper by Mr Elston.

A Lucky Reporter. notice in your paper,” said a Garden Palace Fayre lady to a reporter of Sydney Society. “If you ,” said the representative archly. “ Oh, I can’t here,” she replied; “Just come behind my stall.” He got his kiss—a nice one—and yet all he wanted was “ If you please.”

Ladylike. —The new Duke of Grafton is that well-known “Poodle” Fitzroy who some eleven years ago tied himself up in the matrimonial knot with a young woman of pretty easy virtue, who, when offeied by young Fltzroy’s relations L 20,000 to “ cat ” him, said they might keep their money and be d : she meant to be Duchess of Grafton. And Duchess of Grafton she is sure enough.

To-mobeow’s Excursion to the Exhibition. —Mr Pilkington, who is ever watchful of the comfort of the travelling public, has made arrangements for excursion tickets, available for use to-morrow for the run up to the Exhibition, to be issued this evening up to half-past eight o’clock. Persons desirous of avoiding ihe crush at the ticket office in the morning are advised to get their tickets to-night. The Capture of Winiata. —Auckland speculators appear to think there’s money in showing Barlow, the captor of Winiata the murderer. Birlow was announced to appear at the Theatre Royal on Saturday night, and to give a narrative of adventure, but the authorities prohibited his appearance, and an apology fiom him was read on the stage to the audience. Speculators are endeavoring to get Barlow to come South and exhibit himself. Poultry, Pigeon, and Canary Snow. Attention is direcie I to the announcement elsewhere respecting the second annual exhibition in connection with the Ashburton Poultry, Pigeon, and Canary Association, which takes place on the 2Lst and 22nd hist. Prizes will bo offered in one hundred different classes, and about a hundred exhibits will be disposed of by lot, in accordance with the 18th clause of the Gaming and Lotteries Act. Every visitor will have a chance of getting a prize.

Partnership Dissolutions. —The wellknown firm of R. Wilkin and Co. has dissolved partnership through effluxion of time, and will bo carried on under the old title by Messrs Robert Wilkin, James Wilkin, and W. J. Oliver.—Another wellknown firm, J. T. Ford and Co., has also dissolved, and will be carried on under the same title as heretofore by Mr J. T. Ford, on his own account. Mr Newton, the retiring member of the firm, will carry on an auctioneer’s business in conjunction witli his son.

A Poultry Fanc;ek. Ou Friday night Mr Homersham, of Ashburton, shut up twenty fowls in the fowlhouse at the rear of his premises. On going to let the birds out on the following morning, he discovered that someone had saved him the trouble—the birds had flown, or at anyrate had disappeared. If the fowlhotne was robbed (which does not seem certain as the birds may have got away of their own accord), the thief must have driven up in a cart, or vehicle of some kind, and having transferred Mr Homersham’s live stock from his yard to the bottom of the trap, have driven off. The matter has been reported to the police.

A Broken Window. —Some suspicions that the “ enterprising burglar” had been “ a-burgling,” or attempting to do so at their premises, were entertained by a well-known firm of drapers in Havelock street last evening, on finding a three by three sheet of plate glass broken in their shop window.' The “ foorce ” being inteiviewed, the broken pane was inspected, and the conclusion arrived at by the examining constable that boys and not burglars had caused the mischief. Boys appear to have been playing about in front of the shop, and one to have fallen through the window, whereupon the whole party no doubt made tracks with as little delay as possible. Lion Brewery. —We are pleased to record that Messrs Wood and Digby find the trade at their new brewery steadily increasing. As a consequence they have be: n compelled to erect additional cellarage accommodation, a second brick cellar of 20ft by 15ft having just been added. This new collar is beautifully cool, and is just now full of ale and stout. The space between the two cellars has been roofed over, and the shed thus formed furnishes a capital place for the storage and washing of empty casks, etc., gotta percha pipes bringing down both hot and cold water from the upper part of the building. Taps being fitted to these pipes the water is always available. The firm is now haying a cart built to their order, which will in a few days’ time be running about town to deliver goods, etc. Attention is directed to Messrs Wood and Digby’s now announcement in our advertising columns.

The Late Fatal Fire in Dunedin.— Further particulars to hand from Dunedin state that Captain Kitchener served for many years in the 4(st Regiment, a greater part of the time in Jamaica, where he was married. In 1874 he was induced to come to New Zealand to manage the estate or his uncle. Colonel Kitchener, at Waihono, near Palmerston. He relinquished tiie management two years ago, since which fortune has frowned on him. Their circumstances became worse, and six months ago he opened a boarding establishment in the house where the fire occurred. As every article is destroyed, and not insured, the fire renders them absolutely penniless. General sympathy is expressed for the unfortunate family. The scene at the recovery of the bodies was heartrending. Captain Kitchener is fearfully bruised, and has sustained severe internal injuries. His life was at first despaired of (as is that of the baby;, now, however both the captain and his wife are out of danger. Mrs Kitchener thinks the fire originated through the careless use of colonial coal. “ A Mawkish Sentimentalist.” —Poor Sir George (says the New Zealand Times) must have felt hurt whan the House so thoroughly acquiesced in his statement that he was “ a man of mawkish sentiment aliry.” The chorus of “No, no,” which the lion, member for Auckland East expected was not given, and Mr J. C. Brown, from sheer force of habit, was just on the point of calling out, “ Hear, hear,” when a discreet friend stopped him. Anyone who objects to the flogging of a dirty ruffian who assaults a child, or a brute who tries to kick the life out of a woman, may fairly be described as a man of “mawkish sentimentality.” Then, Sir George must not forget that howoser great his gift of oratory, and however pure the motives which have prompted him, he has for the lost eight years been talking about the wrongs of the wretched serfs whose unhappy lot it has been to come this country to bo ground down by the tyrant landholders. Now, the majority of men don’t believe in the existence of the New Zealand serf and the tyrant landholder,and regard the Knight’s utterances on this subject as something worse than mawkish sentimentality.

An Owner Wanted. —-On Saturday morning a little girl found an excellent silver watch in Ashburton. The watch was handed over to the police, and now awaits a claimant at the depot.

Maori “ Women’s Bights.” —There was a wordy war, which narrowly escaped ending in a bout at fisticuffs between a leading Ngatihawiti of the masculine gender and a Ngatihawiti of the female persuasion, at Marton yesterday. Attached to a gift of food, says the Ilungili/cei Advocate, given to the natives was a L 5 note. The dusky “lord of creation” abovementioned imagined that as he was a prominent man in his tribe, he might undertake the “ shouting ” business, for which the “ fiver ” had evidently been intended by its donors. Ho invited a number of his friends to partake of the contents of the flowing bowl, and had dispensed LI in this kind of hospitality, when a “ lady” member of the tribe, who had a will of her own, a tongue hung well in the centre, and a pair of fists, that feared no foe, no matter of what gender, arrived upon the scene. She affirmed in a manner which brooked no contradiction that the L 5 present was the common properly of the tribe, and that no member of it had a right to expend even a fifth of the sum in treating his particular cronies. The “ shouter ” resented this petticoat interference very vigorously, but when the wearer of the petticoats loomed forth in all her terrors, he “ knocked under,” and beat a hasty retreat.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820703.2.10

Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. MONDAY, JULY 3, 1882., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 678, 3 July 1882

Word Count
2,818

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. MONDAY, JULY 3, 1882. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 678, 3 July 1882

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