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Police Court. —There was a clean sheet at the above Court this morning. Personal. —A pleasing ceremony took place the other evening at Acton Station, llakaia, when Mr W. L. Allan, the wellknown manager, was made the recipient of a handsome gold watch, the gift of the station hands, as a mark of their appreciation of his consistency as an employer, and to celebrate the occasion of his entering the Benedict state.

The Stanmorb Election. —Mr Cowlishaw addressed the electors of Stanmore at Phillipstown last night, and with great difficulty placed his views before those present, owing to the almost incessant interruptions. At the conclusion of the candidate’s address, a motion of thanks was proposed and seconded, and also an amendment, repudiating the conduct of the candidate at the last o’cction, and stating that he was not “ a fit and proper person ” to represent Btanmoro. Both motion and amendment were put from the chair, but neither were carried, and the meeting terminated with three cheers for one of the other candidates. At Bingsland, Mr Pilliet addressed a meeting, and received a vote of thanks and confidence, Mr S. P. Andrews taking the opportunity to state that he should retire in favor of Mr Pilliet. Referring to his professed ignorance of the provisions of the Corrupt Practices Prevention Bill, the candidate made the following confession:—“One evening, after a meeting of electors, he had gone home tired and with a bad headache. ‘ Copy ’ was wanted for the paper, and without actually reading the article in question, he had out it out as it had already appeared in another paper, merely adding three lines at the top and three jines at the bottom.”

Floated. —The ship City of Perth, stranded at Timaru on May 14th, was successfully towed off yesterday afternoon by the tug Lyttelton. She will be taken to Port Chalmers to be docked. Pink Club. —The usual meeting of the above Club is postponed from Thursday (he 22nd to Friday tire 23rd, on account of the counter attraction of the excursion to Christchurch, which takes place tomorrow.

Bigamy.—A woman named Ellen Kelly has been arrested at Auckland on a charge of bigamy, having married Alex. Davidson on the 10th October, her husband, William Kelly being then alive. She was brought up at the Court yesterday morning and remanded. No Case. —Judge Gillies sat in Chambers at Napier on Saturday to settle issues in civil cases. In the action of Gannon v. Craig for libel, damage L 2,000, the Judge remarked that there was no libel and nothing to try, and that the plaintiff could gain nothing by proceeding further. Messrs Brassey and McLean for plaintiff, Mr Finn for defendant.

The Licensing Act. —A well attended meeting of persons interested in temperance was held in the City Hall, Wanganui, last evening. A resolution was carried unanimously in favor of a petition to Parliament against the amendment of the Licensing Act, on the ground that the Act should have a fair trial.

The Exhibitors’ Ball.—About 200 persons were present at this gathering, which took place last night in the Art Gallery of the Exhibition, and was pronounced by those present a most unqualified success, the catering (which was in the hands of Mr Messenger, of His Lordship’s Larder fame) being exceptionally good.

Fires in South Canterbury.—Three stacks of wheat at Otipua, the property of Charles Delamain, were burnt on Sunday morning. There is no clue as to the cause of the fire. The stacks were insured for L3OO in the New Zealand office.

At night a brewery at Geraldine, belongto Edmund Berry, was burnt. It was insured in ihe Victoria Fire and Marine Insurance Office for LIOO.

inAsHBURTON Football Club.—A meettog of the committee of the above Club ci ok place last evening, when it was doLdcd that Messrs Hussey, Hugomin, ocliuer, Pauling, J., A., and E. Fooks, Breft, Fish, Evans, Hunt, Church, Groves, Winter, Shury, Hart, Hepburn, and Wood should form the team to play against the East Christchurch Club on Saturday next.

The Exhibition. —To-morrow Ashburtonites will have a capital opportunity of visiting the “ world’s fair,” the railway authorities having announced a special train for Christchurch at what the play bills would call “ million prices.” The “ special” is timed to leave Ashburton at 9.16 a m., and Christchurch, on its return journey, at 5.55 p.m., thus giving our paterfamilias an excellent opportunity to take their better halves and olive branches to the big show, which is to close in rather leas than a mouth. The “ Clean-Sheeters.” —The Press' special at Wellington wires:—“ There is some talk of a new party, calling themselves the “ clean-sheet ” party, their basis of operation being to “ let the dead past bury its dead,” and start afresh with a clean sheet. This idea seems popular among the new members, who are evidently much puzzled whom to believe, after the positive affirmations and denials to which they have been alternately treated by both sides regarding past transactions.” Te Whiti and Tohu. —These Maori(says a contemporary) returned to Christchurch from their Southern trip on Saturday, one effect of the cold weather experienced in the Lake district being that Te Whiti was seriously indisposed, and had to rest for a few days at Oamaru. At present they are stopping at the Golden Fleece Hotel, where Messrs Ward and Butler have made every provision for their comfort. To Whiti and Tohu both express satisfaction at their return to Christchurch. The Native Minister. —Says the Wellington correspondent of a Christchurch contemporary:—“There has been a long Cabinet meeting at Major Atkinson’s house this evening, the result of which has not transpired; but it is known that Mr Bryce is greatly annoyed at the strong opposition which the Natives Reserves Bill has encountered from members of the Ministerial party. It is even rumored that he has openly declared his intention of resigning if the Bill does not pass substantially in the state in which he introduced it; but this I cannot vouch for.”

A Stormy Trip. —The Kakanui’s last voyage from Dunedin to Invercargill was an eventful one. On opening out the Otago Heads it was found that a very heavy sea was running on the bar. After taking one of these rollers in safety she broached to and got into the trough of the sea. The next roller completely buried her, the water running down the funnel, causing considerable damage in the engine room and captain’s cabin. Fortunately the vessel recovered herself, and succeeded in getting on to the seas again. Some deck cargo was set adrift, but only a small portion went overboard. The mate, who was steering, narrowly escaped being washed overboard.

Ashburton Bridge. The much needed repairs in the shape of re-deoking the Ashburton Bridge have at last been put in hand by the railway authorities. Some time back the ironwork was thoroughly overhauled, and as soon as the present repairs are finished the bridge will be as good as new. So as not to interfere with the traffic, only about a dozen planks are removed at a time. But as the railway authorities notify at each end of the bridge that it is now under repairs, and that they will not be responsible for any accidents that may occur by people crossing it at present, it would be much bettor for anybody with a restive horse to go through the river, as it is tolerably low just now ; but at the same time the bridge is perfectly safe for a pedestrian or any one with a quiet animal.

Political. —The New Zealand Times of yesterday says:—“ Various caucuses have been hold among Parliamentary representatives during the last few days, and the results, so far as yet apparent, point to the formation of two parties arrayed against the present Ministry—one under the leadership of Sir George Grey and the other under Mr Montgomery, with a sort of tacit agreement prevailing that wdien the fitting time comas they will coalesce for defensive and offensive purposes. The arrangement, assuming that it has any foundation outside the uncertainty of passing rumor, doer not indicate any dignified staple of opposition.” The Times also claims Major Harris, the newly-elected member for Franklyn North, as a Government supporter, on the strength of an utterance by the candidate at the nomination, which took place at Otahuhu on Friday, the 11th instant. Major Harris is reported by the New Zcalandllemld to have spoken as follows: “As to supporting Mr Whitaker, it was true ho had promised his support to au Auckland man, and he would give it. Ho would give Mr Whitaker’s Government a thoroughly fair trial, but he would not be dragged through the dirt by any Government.” The correspondents of other papers also report him to have declared his intention to support the Premier and his Government. Throughout his candidature Major Harris constantly expressed similar sentiments in language which was not equivocal, and he appears to have been accepted by the constituency on those conditions.

Riverton. —Mr F. P. O’Reilly, late of Ashburton, has been appointed solicitor to

tlits Town Council of Riverton, Otago. The Comet. —This erratic" stranger appeared last evening low down on the horizon in a westerly direction. It is to he hoped the shy will be cleat er to-night, when no doubt the comet will be more plainly visible.

Marriages : Clergy v. Registrar.— Notwithstanding that the Church does not look favorably upon civil marriages (says the Auckland Herald), they appear, judging from statistics, to be on the increase, and growing popular. Last year, the marriages celebrated by Mr J. M. Wayland, the district Registrar of Marriages, numbered 13f>. Since the beginning of the year he had made happy no less than 70 couples, which indicates a substantial increase of business in his department. The Acetic Acid Cure. —Messrs Mackay Bros., of Christchurch, the wholesale agents for Messrs Coutts and Son, who prepare this infallible remedy for rheumatism, neuralgia, sore throats, etc., notify elsewhere that they have at present a large stock on hand, and that they are prepared to supply it in large or small quantities. There is a large demand for acetic acid for domestic and medicinal purposes ; ic is also a valuable antidote for certain poisons. As will be seen from the advertisement, Messrs Mackay Bros, offer to forward to any address a pamphlet on the subject gratis.

Debating Society. —A private entertainment in connection with the above instead of the usual debate will take place to-morrow evening, at the upper room, Saunders’ Buildings, where the Society will in future meet. Mr H. M. Jones’will lend a piano for the occasion, and some of the most prominent members of the Society have consented to give songs, readings, and recitations. Some ladies, wa understand, will also be present and take pact in the programme. As all members are allowed to bring a couple of friends we expect to be able to chronicle a large attendance. The Death of Garibaldi.— The news of the death of the illustrious patriot Garibaldi was received with profound regret throughout Europe A national monument is to be erected to his memory in Italy, and subscriptions towards that object are flowing in from all quarters. Statues of the deceased General are to be erected in his honor in various towns of Italy and the Continent. The death of Garibaldi was announced in the French Chamber of Deputies on Saturday, and immediately on receipt of the nows the sitting of the Chamber was suspended, and an adjournment unanimously agreed to as a mark of respect to Garibaldi’s memory.

How John Had the Faro Keeper.—A Chinaman recently went into a Loadville faro bank, and placed a paper of gold dust on the ace. The ace lost, and the dealer weighing the dust, found that it was worth about 50dols. He was about to throw the paper away, when John asked for it, saying there were some “ washee washee ” accounts upon it which he required. _ The next night he returned and bet a similar paper. This time he won, and as the dust weighed 40dols, the dealer proposed to pay him upon that basis. The heathen shook his head. “ You payee all I bet V’ “Certainly,” answered the dealer. Then John, carefully unwrapping the paper, showed hidden between its folds a lOOdol bill. “Ho must have it,” sighed the look-out man ; “ he’s got us dead.” The bank note was there the night before, but the dealer had handed it back. This was his fault, however, not the Chinaman’s.

The Late Nor’-Wester. —The nor’wester that blew so hard at the latter end of last week seems to have done some little damage at Akaroa. Judging from what the local paper says, all the boats, including the yacht Chance, and some large whaleboats, seem to have broken adrift and either sunk or been driven high up the beach. The jetty also seems to have sustained some little damage. On shore matters do not appear to have been much better, as some of the best fruit trees suffered severely by being stripped of their fruit. In Lyttelton, the wind seems to have been nearly as severe, as the s.s. Akaroa was unable to face it, although she badly wanted to get to Akaroa with the pump for the ss. Westport, which vessel was ashore there. The Ashburton and Rakaia rivers were higher than they have been known to be for some years past, but we have have not heard of any damage near home. A Liberal Bishop. —The Bishop of Waiapu was present recently at a Wesleyan anniversary soiree at Napier, and delivered an address. He said that his being present that evening was an instance of the possibility of the riciprocity and mutuality that should exist between the different branches of the Christian Church, the pastor of that church, Mr Lewis, had favored the Church of England Temperance Society with his presence at a recent meeting, and he (the Bishop) had much pleasure in accepting the invitation to be present at the celebration that evening of the anniversary of Trinity Church. He took very great interest in that congregation, and, in fact, in every congregation that calls itself Christian. It seemed to him that Christians should stand together shoulder to shoulder, and deal with each other with Christian charity. His Lordship (according to the Hawke’s Bay Herald) then proceeded to give instances that had come within his personal knowledge of different denominations uniting in good works with the best results, and concluded by urging upon them as a congregation to do their utmost to establish the reading of the Bible in the schools throughout the colony.

Rather Rough.—The Timaru Herald.

usually circumspect enough, has been had” in a very cruel manner. A paragraph appeared in the Herald a few days ago drawing attention to the tact that Mr Turnbull, M.H.11., had said that for his part h« did not care about being reported in “Hansard.” In reference to this “ par.” an anonymous letter appeared in yesterday’s Herald which set the town laughing, and which is destined to become as famous in its way as the celebrated “ Chantry is an idiot ” hoax. The letter is as follows: — The member for Timaru.—To the Editor of the Timarn Herald. —Sir,—Your pithy summing up of the character of our member in epigramatic Latin quotation in this morning’s paper tickled my fancy immensely, and I am sure that no leader you could have written on the subject would have been so telling ; but I think it a pity that you did not give the translation for the benefit of your readers. lam no Latin scholar, but better versed in the language of the Gael, but believe that “Out of nothing nothing comes ” very nearly hits the nail on the head, and it is almost identical with our Erse proverb (which is known almost as well as the Latin), ‘‘S’ sanasidlare/i, ehtfo rotideeht" to say that he represents the public opinion of any but the smallest section of the community is a libel on our understanding.—l am, &c. Uussiii Siosdna. June 19th, 18S2, Thu italics arc to be read backward, when they make the following—“ The editor of the Herald is an ass.” The signature treated in the same manner ’s almost as startling—“ And so is his sub ! ”

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820620.2.8

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 667, 20 June 1882

Word Count
2,721

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 667, 20 June 1882

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