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Father Larkin’s Trial. —We published a letter in last Thursday’s issue in reference to a rumor which was currently circulated in this town, signed by an “ Elector,” asking whether there was any truth in connecting Mr Ivess’name with that of Father Larkin in his trial on the West Coast, and whether Mr Ivess turnsd Queen’s evidence. We believe the letter in question was not written with a view to injure Mr Ivess in the eyes of his fellow townsmen, but to got the truth or otherwise of the rumor. We feel quite satisfied that Mr Ivess has completely refuted the statement that ho had any connection with the affair at all, after reading his reply to the queries at Mr Bullock’s rooms on Thursday evening. With such a denial before us, it is but just to acknowledge our regret that any letter apparently reflecting in way upon Mr Ivess in this matter shoo'd have appeared in our columns. The Tinwald Church Concert.—Wo are desired to state that Mr Joseph Ward was the chairman at the concert at Tinwald, and not the Ilev. E. A. Scott as stated in onr report. The mistake was made through the wrong information being given to our reporter.

Police Court. —At the local Court this morning, the only delinquent was Henry Dudley, who was charged with being drunk anti and making use of obscene language. Mr Tl. Alcorn, who was on the Bench, sentenced Dudley to twenty-four hours’ imprisonment, with hard labor, at the same time administering a severe reprimand to the offender, who appears to bo an incorrigible individual.

Accident. —We regret to learn that a serious accident befell Mr Cuthbert, surveyor to the Longbeach Road Board, on Friday evening last. He was returning with Mrs Cuthbert from the Masonic concert, and when near Tinwald his horse shied and bolted, and threw Mr Cuthbert violently to the ground, causing a compound fracture of one of his legs. Wo have not heard any further particulars beyond the fact that the unfortunate gentleman is progressing as well as can be expected. Football —A scratch match was played on Saturday last on the Domain ground, and despite a heavy nor’-wester blowing at the time, a most enjoyable game was played. We noticed several new faces who will no doubt bo acquisitions to the local club, particularly Messrs Winter, Hussey, Jackson, and Hart, the three former being remarkably good forwards, while the latter player is indefatigable behind the scrimmages, and shows good speed. Owing to the late inclement weather, our local “ kickista ” have had very little practice, but as the match Against the East Christchurch Club takes place on Saturday rext, wo would suggest that every convenient day be taken advantage of for practice. Hitherto, the Ashburton Club has shown up very respectably in its matches, and if we are to judge by the form displayed on Saturday, the members have not quite lost their knowledge of the game. All members are requested to be on the ground for practice at a quarter to four on Wednesday afternoon.

Too Bad of the Comet. —Says a Press Association item from Wellington:— “ The comet reported to have been seen in other parts of the colony has not been seen here.”

Garibaldi. —A meeting of Italians has been held at Wellington to express their admiration for the late General Garibaldi. It is probable that an Italian working men’s club will be formed in the Empire City.

A New Shipping Company. —Owing to the difficulty that has been experienced for the past month or two in getting produce away from the port of Oamaru, through the scarcity of vessels, there is a talk of forming a shipping company to trade between Oamaru and other ports. Aquatic. —Hearn has accepted a challenge to row Reynold, of Sydney, for LIOO, and adds that he will allow him L 25 expenses to come to Wellington. Hearn also states that there are no skiffs in Wellington. .Reynolds should bring two with' him from Sydney, and Hearn will toss for choice.

Oats and Potatoes. — A telegram has reached the Daily Times from Sydney staling that New Zealand producers are foolish to glut that market with oats and potatoes, misled by market reports. The telegram adds that a quantity of good oats was withdrawn from sale at 2s 8d per bushel.

Off the Line. —On Saturday morning the train from Rollcston to Springfield ran off the line at Aylesbury. The line was blocked for several hours, and the engine was seriously damaged. The cause of the mishap is supposed to have been something wrong with the points at the junction of the main line and the siding.

The Ei.ectp.io Light in Lyttelton Harbor —On Saturday night the electric light was used in lieu of the ordinary gas light with great success. The light was kept burning until after the departure of the Union Company’s s.s. Albion for the North, and was duly appreciated by the passengers, who loudly cheered as the steamer moved off.

Gun Accident. — A Fortrose telegram brings word that a young gentleman named Slater, recently from home, who was on a visit to Mr E. S. Yernon, of Toitois station, has been discovered lying dead beside a creek in the bush. Ho had been out shooting, and his gun had evidently discharged itself, as the top of the young man’s head was blown clean off. Woodstock.— Cormick and party, at the Woodstock rush, washed up on Saturday, and obtained twenty-two ounces of gold as a result from forty loads of washdirt. A number of other claims will

wash, up immediately, they having been waiting for water. The rush (says a telegram) is extending daily, and there are about twelve hundred men on the field. The Defaulter Shepherd. The Timaru Herald of to-day states that at a meeting of the creditors of the absconded debtor, J. M. Shepherd, held a day or two ago, it was resolved to boar the ex-

pense of sending a detective after him, news of his landing in California having been received. In pursuance of that decision Detective Kirby left Timaru on Saturday, to catch the outgoing San Francisco mail steamer at Auckland. One Way of “ Escaping. ” —Rather a serious accident occurred in George street, Dunedin, on Saturday night, whilst a fire escape was being tried. Two firemen wore coming down from the top storey of a drapery warehouse, when the rope broke, and the two men fell through the verandah on to the pavement. Two boys named Finlayson were struck by the men as they landed, and were stunned. One remained unconscious all night, but neither is seriously injured. The firemen escaped with a few bruises. Serious Accident. Yesterday morning (says the Press) about twenty minutes past ter o’clock, Charles Makanini, hairdresser and tobacconist of Colombo street Christchurch, was driving a horse in a buggy along Colombo street, near the Bank of New Zealand, when the horse made a sudden turn, and ran the buggy against a footbridge, the result of which was that Makanini was thrown violently against a teLgraph post, receiving a severe scalp wound on the right temple. The sufferer was at once removed to the hospital.

Flogging Jodas Iscariot's Effigy.— This year the old Good Friday custom of flogging an efhgy of Judas Iscariot was, after a lapse of two years, duly celebrated in the London docks by the crews of three Portugese and Maltese vessels. The effigy of the traitor, hewn out of a block of timber, was carried by cho’en members of the crew round the quarter deck and hanged from the yard arm, and each man chanted his vituperation as he lashed the figure with knotted ropes. The scourging over, Judas was cut down, thrown upon the deck, spat upon, cursed, and kicked to the galley fire, where ho was burned into a charred mass, and then hurled into the water, after which the sailors went in procession to church. Low Dresses. —On the evening dress of the season, which is cut lower than ever. Truth remarks—“ To such an extent has the lowness of the bodice been carried that some ladies cannot consent to appear in what, with its utter absence of sleeves, can wnly bo called ‘ a triumph of nudity,’ and so they use little lace fichus to supplement the incomplete dress sent home by the modiste. Other ladies, again, indulge to the fullest extreme. It is by no moans uncommon to see the opening of a dross reach almost to the waist in front and quite to the waist at the back. This is the pointed stylo. We think it is a very pointed style. The old rounded bodices, having no sleeves, seem to recede more and more. The square bodices, sometimes open only in front, sometimes both back and front, seem to be all square, and no bodice. Then there is a new evening bodice, called ceil du roi, which is fastened at the threat, but spreads open widely below.” Tenth adds, all these varieties are cut so excessively low that even a spray of flowers is often not only an ornament, but, serving as a veil, is positively a charity. Figaro delicately observes that you cannot speak about a ball dress from the waste upwards, because there isn’t anything to speak of.

The Ladies Woke the . Some recent discoveries of manuscript have thrown a remarkable light upon the gelations of husband and wife in ancient Egypt, and the Times has devoted a large amount of space to publishing translations of the most striking among these documents Summing up the inferences drawn from a study of those treasures, it says : “ Whether relating to affairs concerning the living or affairs concerning the dead, they present a vivid picture of tho social life of the people of Egypt under the Ptolemies; audit h certainly not too much to say that it is a picture to which no pendant can be found in the history of any other highly-civilised race, whether ancient or modern. In it wo behold a world in which tho balance of domestic power is reversed. The woman owns all and rules nil ; the man is a helpless dependent; and both belong to the priest. A more insignificant and pitiable object than the Egyptian paterfamilias can hardly be conceived. As a child he was the property of his mother ; as a married man he was the pensioner of his wife; as a corpse he belonged to his Choachyte, who could sell him, mortgage him, or will him away at pleasure. Born or unborn, married or single, living or dead, ho was never his own property or his own master. To speak of him as a man and a citizen would be a figurative expression. He was a marketable investment, like a horso or a piece of land, or a Government annuity.”

Servant Gluts.—A novel speculation has been gone into by two Geelong men with a view of lessening the evil. They propose shipping several leads of servants to Melbourne, under fixed engagements. It is stated that the females in Germany exceed the males by 1,000,000 ; that the servants are of an excellent class ; and that the average wages do not exceed L 7 per annum with board.

Library Committee. — A committee meeting was held on Saturday evening last at Mr Ward’s office. Present— Messrs Ward, Douglas, Lechner, St. Hill, and Scott. The Secretary produced a list of subscriptions showing that a sum of LIOO had already been promised to the building fund. The complete plans were laid before the committee, and it was decided to authorise the architect to call for tenders, to be sent in by the next monthly meeting.

The Evils of Drink. —The United Kingdom Alliance News publishes a supplement to its ordinary number, with the heading, “Fruits of the Liquor Traffic,” and is a list of the drink horrors reported in the newspapers of the last week of the old year and the first week of the new, as having come before the Bench. A considerable number never come before the notice of the police, so that the list does not give a full idea of the evil done. The list "extends over fourteen pages of the paper, three columns in each page, and comprise homicides, manslaughter, and murders, suicides, attempted suicides, stabbing, cutting, and wounding, premature sudden or violent deaths, rowdyism, and violent assaults, assaults on policemen, cruelty to children, assaults on women, and women drunk.

The Pope as a FArmer.—How many people are there (asks ’Land) who know that the Pope is a farmer ? Such is the fact, however, and there is reason to believe that His Holiness makes a very good thing of it. Leo. XHI. “ goes in,” however, neither for the growing of cereals nor the raising of stock, but for the breeding of fish. The lagoons of Comacchio are thus turned to profitable use. Eels are the staple, several tons of cooked eels arc sent from the lagoons every Lent. The fish come up in immense shoals from the Adriatic, and are fed in the lagoons on other fish provided for them, until they are nicely fattened, when they are killed and cooked in a vast kitchen. The laborers on these water farms dwell in barracks built on an island. This is yet another instance of the strange use to which land may be put. Jumbo in New York.— Jumbo is the universal topic in New York. The newspapers devote columns to him, and each contains the following advertisement, displayed in the biggest type “ The Colossus of elephants is now hero—Jumbo. The people of two hemispheres excited over the purchase. Just arrived from the Zoologic d Gardens, costing thirty thousand '"dollars. The mighty monarch of boasts landed amidst the enthusiastic

shouts of half a million of people 1 All England against his departure. All America bound to have him. Brought here against the regrets of Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales, and despite the inj unctions of the land and the voice of united Europe. Ridden upon by the Queen and Roj'al Family and by over a million children; its loss mourned by every child in Great Britain. Now on exhibition with the greatest show on earth.” Sixteen horses dragged, and two elephants occasionally pushed, the box containing Jumbo from the dock to the gardens during the night without accident.

Indian Tradition. The following strange tradition prevails among the American Indians. The Indians say that when the Great Spirit mado the earth he also made three men, all of whom were fair complexioned, and after making them he led them to the margin of a small lake and bade them leap in and wash. One obeyed, and came out of the water purer and fairer than before ; the second hesitated a moment, during which time the water, agitated by the first, had become muddled, and when he bathed he came up copper-colored ; the third did not leap in till the water had become black with mud, and he came out darkest of the three. Then the Great Spit it laid before them three packages, and, out of pity for his misfortune in color, gave the black man the first choice. He took hold of each of the packages, and, having felt the weight, chose the heaviest ; the copper-colored man then chose the next heaviest, leaving the white man the lightest. When the packages were opened the first was found to contain spades, hoes, and all the implements of labor; the second enwrapped hunting, fishing, and warlike apparatus; the third gave the white man pen, inks, and paper —the engines of the mind, the means of mental improvement, the social link of humanity, the foundation of the white man’s superiority.

A Little Heroine. —A lady, in London, writing to a friend in Auckland relative to the foundering of the ship Famenoth on the coast of Cornwall, makes the following reference to the courage and presence of mind of a litJe girl, who was a passenger on board the vessel at the time of the disaster :—We quote : "Throe of Shaw and Savill’s clerks were on the ship at the time of the accident, and they cannot say enough in little Pearl s praise. They say they never saw anyone behave better in a time of danger. The poor child was from six o’clock on Saturday night till seven o’clock on Sunday evening without a morsel to eat, as the ship foundered just as the people were going to breakfast. One of the clerks came to enquire after her a day or two after, and he told mo, amongst other things, that some man put a biscuit in Pearls hand, and said, ‘Eat that, you poor little thing,’ but she replied, ‘ No, thank you, I’ll wait and see if I am to be drowned first We all feel proud of the child’s pluck. Some of the women, and even the men, quite lost their heads, and had to be taken from the sinking vessel by main force.” [The child, Pearl, spoke of is Miss Little, seven years old, the daughter of Captain Little, 8.N., and granddaughter of Mrs Hamlin, Epsom.]

New Zealand’s Volunteers. —The report of the Volunteer Board, says the Wellington correspondent of a Northern contemporary, has been forestalled by the summary of the Board’s recommendations, which was telegiaphed a week or two ago. The Board further recommend, however, that the present volunteer force should be disbanded from h date to be fixed by proclamation, and that the new system should come into force on January Ist, 1833. They advise that only such a strength should bo kept up as in a state of thorough efficiency will be sufficient for the duties which they may be called on to perform in support of naval defences, and in preventing landing fiom an enemy’s crusier at the chief harbors. But this smaller force must be efficient, and efficiency can only bo attained by an increased expenditure. The Board proposes that the “ first line ” should consist of 2042 artillery and rifles (including officers), with 530 cavalry, or 2572 in all, to bo located at the chief ports. The second line to number 1827 of artillery. It is proposed to strike out the battery at Invercargill, and to have an extra one at Auckland, because of the defective communication by rail, while the South Island p"rts could assist one another. It is estimated that the cost per volunteer under the new system will be about L 3 18s 9d per head infantry, L 4 Is lOd artillery, L 5 4s lid cavalry. This reduces the total cost by one half. The Board advise that future volunteer estimates bo kept separate from those for the constabulary. The total estimated cost for the first year will be L 28,500; second, L 19,381.

Turned Out By Machinery,— Having inspected the enterprising Mr Lancaster’s premises in East street one day last week, we had a look at the steam sausage and small goods manufactory. Mr Lancaster evidently believes that '* cleanliness is next to Godliness,” for his new machinery enables the small goods to be turned out with a rapidity and freedom from contact with fingers that should insure for him even a larger share of patronage than already falls to his share. “One Corpse, Johnston.” Some strange announcements occasionally find their way into the shipping column of a newspaper. Recently the words that constitute the heading of this paragraph appeared in the export list of a steamer from the Bluff to Melbourne, which, we now learn, conveyed en route to Adelaide the remains of Captain Johnston, who was intimately associated with the development of South Australia’s river navigation. He died on the 29th ult. at Queensland, whither he had gone for the benefit of his health. Lucky Archibald. —The Melbourne correspondent of the Timaru Herald writes : —“ Mr Archibald Forbes has been feted ad nauseam in this city, and on Saturday night an assembly of the snobocracy, calling themselves literary men. but who in reality are mere reporters, held a banquet in his honor. Mr Forbes must have been somewhat amused at the whole proceeding. Mr Lalor, tne Speaker of our Assembly, made the hit of the evening. * The Press ’ was proposed before Parliament, and Mr Lalor said he was not surprised at it, as it was said the press had “ bossed ” the present and the late Ministry.” A CRtJEL Sentence. —Mr Hardcastie, the erratic R. M. of Wellington, has been giving another extraordinary sentence. An apparently respectable young man named Moxham was charged with embezzling the paltry sum of 2s 3d, the property of his employer, a milkseller at Wellington. The prosecutor admitted that there had been laxity in keeping the accounts between himself and the accused. The magistrate, however, convicted the prisoner and sentenced him to a month’s imprisonment with hard labor ! By what rule does Mr Hardcastie measure his sentences ? Sometimes they are absurdly light and at other times cruelly severe. Mr Hardcastie does not appear to us to be precisely “ the right man in the right place.”

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820619.2.10

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 666, 19 June 1882

Word Count
3,522

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 666, 19 June 1882

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