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TELEGRAMS.

j PKIt IMiKSS ASSOCIATION.] Brigantine Ashore. Gisbobne, To-day. The brigantine Isabella, from Tiinaru, with flour, oats, etc., for this port, ha R gone ashore at Isig I’ive", Poverty Pay. The Shooting Case at a Boardinghouse. Cui:is i cii unon, To day. At the Magistrate’s Court this morning David McXevin was charged with having shot at John G'anville with intent to hill. The offence was commit!ced at Toomcr’s hoarding-house on Tuesday night. Mr McConnell, solicitor, applied for a remand till Friday, and intimated that a plea of insanity would bo set up, The remand was gran tech

Contempt of Court. —During the hearing of the electoral roll cases this morning the proceedings were constantly interrupted by the loud “ ho, ho !” of someone in the crowd of auditors. The thing became so intolerable at last that Mr Burnell remarked that the Court appeared to be turned into a political arena. 'the police just afterwards pounced upon Mr Thomas Prendergast, who was brought up before the Bench, and ordered to be imprisoned until the rising of the Court. He was also fined 40s.

Mount Somers Road Board. —Owing to the very bad weather on Monday last the usual monthly meeting of the above Board lapsed for want of a and was adjourned until Monday, 12th inst., at 1 p. m.

The Acid Cure. —A notification respecting the celebrated acid cure ar pears elsewhere.

Liquid Poison. —Some cheerful recipes were found upon a man named M‘Hugh, a grog-doctor, wha was arrested the other day at Napier for drunkenness. These recipes were for making brandy, gin, port wino, etc., and show that the power of chemicals is very great. The list of materials necessary is not very lively reading, rather gloomy and saddening indeed, particularly to a man who likes a glass. To procure whisky, spirits of wine, creosote, and essence of capsicum are necessary ; brandy requires spirits of wine, oil of cognac, carbonate of soda, ami burnt sugar to color it; port wine can be made with logwood, sandalwood, carbonate of soda, and citric acid ; sherry is procurable by boiling raisins, and adding carbonate of soda and a cetain quantity of the best brandy; this recipe was called “fine,’ but we doubt the sherry being so, especially if the brandy used in its manufacture was made as directed. The man who would compound such distressing mixtures deserves to drink them. Faith in human nature is weakened by such a disclosure. Perhaps the Belgian chemist was not far out when he said, “ Wine can bo made from any tiling, even from grapes.”Tailor (to a stout customer) : “ Have the kindness to put your finger on this bit of tape, sir—just here ! I’ll be round in a minute !”

“ Let’s ’lnstrate it.” hiccoughed a political orator. “It’s beautiful. You see, an old farmer conies to town loaded with new wheat, an’ goes home loaded with old rye.” Holloway's Pills. Liver Complaints.—The digestion cannot be long so seriously disordered without the derangement being perceptible on the countenance. These pills prevent both unpleasant consequences ; they improve the appetite and with the increase of desire for food, they augment the powers of digestion and assimilation in the stomach. Holloways Pills deal most satisfactorily with deranged or diseased conditions of the many organs engaged in extracting nourishment for our bodies from our various diets—as the liver, stomach, and bowels, over all of which they exercise the most salutary control. By resorting at an early stage of this malady to these purifiying and laxative Pills, the dyspeptic is speedily restored to health and strength, and his sallowness gradually vanishes.—-[Advt.]

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820608.2.18

Bibliographic details

TELEGRAMS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 657, 8 June 1882

Word Count
597

TELEGRAMS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 657, 8 June 1882

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