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The Wakanoi Seat. —The writs for the Wiikanui election are expected to be in the hands of the Returning Officer this evening ; the nominations will take place on the 9th June, and the poll will probably be taken a week later.

The Wires. —ln consequence of the Telegraph office being closed to-day, we are unable to place before our readers the usual batch of telegrams and a detailed account of the Grand National Steeple chase Meeting at Christchurch. Free. —Four inebriates were in the lock-up this morning, and Mr Percy Cox, J.P., went up to hear the charges. All four were dismissed, and went on, their way rejoidhlg, to spend Her Majesty’s Birthday as seemed best to them. “Unimproved Arable Land.” —Mr Joseph Ivess requests us to make a correction. In the report of his Town Hall meeting the other night he is reported to have said he was in favor of taxing arable land, whereas he said that he was in favor of taxing “ unimproved arable land.”

Ashburton Woollen Factory.— A general meeting of the shareholders of the above is called for Monday, May 29th, at the Town Hall, at 3 p.m., when the Provisional Directors will submit their report, and Permanent Directors will bo appointed, in addition, probably, to other business.

An am a Stone at the Exhibition.— The Hon. W. S. Peter shows three samples of building stone from the Amma quarry, Ashburton, at the Exhibition. The exhibits were yesterday commended by the award jurors for variety, durability and supply.

Tk Whiti and Tohu on their Travels. —To Whiti and Tolui, accompanied by the Government interpreter, were passenger i by this morning’s express for Dunedin, where they go to “do” the sights of that city. While the train stopped here they were, as on the former occasion of their passing through Ashburton, the contra of attention.

The Bodway “Watch” Swindle.— The City of New York brings the intelligence from Sydney that the trial of Rodway and Wilson for defrauding the public by “coupon advertisements” is concluded. Rod way was sentenced to two and a half years, and Wilson to twelve mouths’ imprisonment. Fancy Fairs and Church Funds.— After a long discussion in the Sydney Diocesan Synod upon the motion that fancy fairs for church funds are not calculated to further the cause of religion, the previous question was carried by a large majority, and the Synod adjourned for ten weeks.

Is Yankee Grab an Unlawful Game! —-In a charge against a publican at the Police Court Dunedin, yesterday, for allowing “ Yankee grab ” to be carried on, Mr McDcrmot, for the defence, raised a point that this was not an unlawful game under the Act. Mr Carew, R. M., who was inclined to agree with counsel, postponed his cleoison.

Shipping Disaster at Timaru.—The body of W. McLaren, who was drowned on the occasion of the late wrecks, was recovered last afternoon. Another body, believed to be that of Mr Gardiner, second mate of the City of Perth, was observed floating in the surf. Mr Blacklock, the chief officer of the City of Perth, who died at Timaru the other day, leaves a widow and family unprovided for. His widow keeps a lodging-house in the East India Docks road, London. The Queen’s Birthday. —The sixtythird anniversary of the birthday! of her most gracious Majesty has passed off very quirtly in Ashburton, the town presenting a semi-deserted appearance all day. This is doubtless attributable to the Exhibition at Christchurch, and the Grand National meeting attracting people away from the place. To-day has been a great one at the Exhibition, and finer weather for the holiday makers could not have been desired.

1.0 G.T.—The Star of the East Lodge

will celebrate its eighth anniversary this

evening by holding a tea and concert at the Templar Hall. Tea will be on the table at half past five o’clock, and will be followed at half past seven by the concert and miscellaneous entertainment. In addition to the songs, readings, recitations, etc., the Revs. Scott, Standage, Nixon, and others have promised to deliver addresses. Mr 11. Alcorn will occupy the chair. Wo quite expect to chronicle a full house and “ a good time.” Holiday Trains. —The special train

which left Dunedin at eight o’clock last evening arrived at Ashburton shortly after five o’clock this morning. It consisted of sixteen carriages. About seventy Ashburtonians rolled up on the platform, and availed themselves of the excursion to the Cathedral City. The morning was sharp, and it was observed that blue noses and overcoats were in tire ascendant. The special will return here at 10.30 to-night. Last night’s express consisted of twenty carriages, the largest express train that ever passed through Ashburton. Three extra carriages were added hero.

Our Gallvnt Defenders. —Last evening the usual monthly inspection parade of the Ashburton Volunteer Corps was held. The band attended, and played a few selections very creditably before the company “fell in.” After some preliminary evolutions, the company, under the command of Lieut. Douglas, marched to Tinwald, the band heading the way, and playing enlivening music on the route. The company, after about twenty minutes’ halt at the Tinwald Hotel, returned to the drill shed (Bullock’s auction rooms). Before dismissing the men, Lieut. Douglas informed them that as no ammunition had been sent there would bo no parade or filing at the butts to-day, as previously proposed.

Rapid Breathing as an Anaesthetic. —Dr M. T. Yates, in a letter published in the Biblical Recorder, says of the surgical operation to which ho has recently submitted “My doctors said that they had seen it stated hy an American doctor that if a person would breathe as rapidly as possible under an operation he would not fool the pain of cutting, and they wished to try it on me, to which proposition I assented. Dr M‘Leod superintended the breathing—which was like that of a dog on a hot summer day—holding, out of my sight, a handkerchief in his hand, to be dropped as a signal when ho saw the color come to my face, for Henderson, the operating doctor, to go ahead. When M'Leod told me, ‘ That will do,’ I was surprised to find that the operation had been performed. This I have tried three times, and have not at either time felt more pain than is usually inflicted in the case of vaccination. I heard the knife rip through the flesh like the sound produced in cutting leather, but did not feel the pain. What is the philsophy of this kind of anaesthetic 1 Is it simply a diversion of the mind ? ” Richmond Herald.

A Child’s Letter to the Queen. — From Truth we gather that the following correspondence has passed between her Majesty and a child. That the Queen should at once have replied to the letter whilst she was receiving congratulations from all the princes and diguataries of the world is evidence of her groat kindness of heart ;—'‘G7 Bonnorly road, Wandsworth Common, S. W. My dear Queen —My papa has just coino home and said a bad man has tried to shoot you. What a wicked man bo must bo to want to shoot such a good Queen. I hope he will be punished for it. Papa says ho must be mad, and I think ho must be the maddest man that ever lived. lam so glad that you have not been hurt, and so is papa and mamma. Good night, and may God bless you.— Edith E. Elliott. March 2, 1882.” The Queen’s reply was as follows : —“ Windsor Castle. Captain Edwards has received the Queen’s command to thank Miss Edith E. Elliott for her kind little letter, and to express her Majesty’s gratification upon reading it. March 3,1882.”

After Eleven o’Olook. — The proprietor of the Theatre Royal Hotel, Wellington, was yesterday fined 20s for employing a barmaid after eleven o’clock at night.

What a Name I—We1 —We notice by the Oxford Calendar, of which University Mr Oscar Wilde is a not undistinguished member, being a graduate and junior Fellow of ftldgdaleti College, that the full names of the original Bunthorne .are “ Oscar O’Flaherty Wilde !” There is soniethihg syndnymous about the two hist ; blit what a name for an aisthotic !

Hints for Dairymen. Recently a public meeting was hold at Teniuka, when it was decided to start a butter, cheese, and bacon-curing factory in that district. One of the promoters, in the course of his remarks, said that one of the questions to decide was—Could a sufficient quantity of milk be obtained in the district to keep a factory going ? One gentleman had stated that his cows gave six gallons each every day, another said two gallons, another that he could obtain 14lbs of butter a week from one cow. He (the speaker) came to the conclusion that two or three gallons would bo a fair average, and allowing that it took two acres of land to keep one cow, the milk from ten cows at 3d per gallon would therefore realise LI2G per year. As it took 20 acres to keep ten cows, he allowed as expenses—Rent, L4O; servants’ wages, Ll 5; wear of utensils, L2; depreciation of cows, L2; which would leave a net profit from ten cows of LG7 a year. As pigs would also be kept at the factory on the whey, the farmer, if he were a shareholder, would receive a double profit. Cheese if sent home would pay well, for suppose it only sold at 8d per lb, Id would pay all the cost of freight and other charges.

Victor Hugo and the Cabby. “ Stella,” the Paris correspondent of the Sydney Herald, contributes the following among other items of gossip : —“ Who shall say that popularity is an empty sound ? Victor Hugo, a short time ago, after making some calls, took a cab and went home. On offering his faro to the driver the latter refused it, saying that the honor of driving Victor Hugo was sufficient, and after delivering this statement gave his horse a flick with his whip and drove away. By chance, a few days afterwards, the old poet took a cab, and found he had lighted on the same cabman, so, on getting out, he insisted on the latter accepting a piece of twenty francs. But Jehu was equal to the occasion; he carried the money straight to the office of Victor Hugo’s paper —Le Rappel —and gave it to a subscription started by that sheet. ‘ Deuco take the fellow !’ cried Victor Hugo, on learning what the man had done with the money, ‘ What can Ido to gratify him 1 Suppose I invite him to dinner V And he did so, to the immense delight of his humble admirer, who, since he has dined at the poet’s table, has become the admiration and envy of all his fellows in this city.”

The Christchurch Licensed Victuallers and the New Act.— A special general meeting of the Christchurch Licensed Victuallers Association was held last evening at the City Hotel to discuss the new Licensing Act. It was resolved that the following suggested alterations be sent to every Licensed Victuallers’ Association in the colony, and to every member of Parliament;—“ (a) Clause 11 That licensing committees be nominated by Government, instead of being elected by ratepayers ; also that the districts embraced by committees be enlarged, one or two members urging that there might be one committee for Christchurch and suburbs. (b) Clause 29—That sub-sections 2 and 4 mentioning New Zealand wine and bottle licenses bo expunged, (c) Clause 30—That a publican’s license should authorise selling from 6 a.m. till 11 p. m. ; clause 154 to be altered accordingly, (d) Clause 205—That this be expunged, the matters to be left to the Licensing Bench. It was pointed out that this clause rendered it compulsory that forfeiture of license should result from two convictions within six months, (e) Clause 44, subsection 14—To read that the decision of the committee, when once announced by the chairman,may berecorded. Clause 207, sub-sections 2 and 3—That these, dealing with disqualification of premises, be expunged, Failing this, thattheword ‘person’ be substituted for ‘premises.’” Also — “ That the committee insert in their proposed alterations a suggestion by circular to all members of Parliament to have a clause inserted in the Act allowing hotels to open from one to three on Sunday afternoon.”

Strong-scented Plants Hurtful in Bedrooms. —Dr Reitter in the Austrian Fachseilschrift, heaps together a number of alarming examples of the danger of sleeping in a room with certain fruits and flowers, if those are present in any considerable quantify. The orange and the hyacinth in blossom he regards as especially hurtful. A number of vases containing hyacinths in full flower produced headache and sleeplessness, not only in a nervous and excitable woman, but in a thoroughly sound and healthy man. He records a case which came under his notice where a young fellow surrounded the bed of a friend with branches of oleander in full bloom. He was horrified at finding, the next morning, that his friend had fallen asleep under this Arcadian bower, never to awake again. A grocer and his son, at a busy time, slept in a room which was crowded with chests full of oranges, and both were killed. A young merchant made use of a bag of saffron for a pillow, and paid the penalty of his ignorance by dying in his sleep. Dr Reitter, after the production of other examples of the deleterious effect, in a sleeping room, of all vegetable products with a strong odour, advises his readers to banish them during the night. Scentless plants he considers to be loss hurtful, but regards it as the wisest course not to suffer any plants at all to remain in a bedroom after sunset.

Hands All Round. —The Evening Post learns ‘ with some surprise and regret that the Government have actually given instinotions for the multiplication of copies of Mr Tennyson’s song, ‘ Hands All Round,’ by means of photo-lithograpy, with the view to its wide circulation in this colony. Our contemporary protests altogether against public money being wasted in the circulation of this wretched rubbish. It is all very well to respect the Poet Laureate and admire his works, but if he chooses to send out such miserable maunderings as “ Hands All Round,” set to equally trumpery music, with a request for its performance in New Zealand, that is no reason why the money of taxpayers should be squandered in vitiating the poetical and musical taste of the colonial public by circulating such dreary drivel. Mark Twain speaks of a ship's poet laureate, in regard to whom it once happened that ‘ the fountains of his great deep were broken up, and ho rained ineffable bosh for twenty-four hours.’ A similar accident must have happened to Mr Tennyson, and “ Hands All Round” is one of the drops.”

Holloway’s Pills.- —-Healthor Wealth.— No sane person would hesitate an instant in the choice between these two conditions. Now is the season to secure the former either by restoring or confirming it. These Pills expel all impurities from the system which fogs, foul vapours, aud variable temperatures engender during winter ; this medicine also acts most wholesomely upon the skin by disgorging the liver of its accumulated bile, and by exciting the kidneys to more energetic a:tion ;it increases the appetite for food and strengthens the digestive process. The stomach and liver, which most disorders originate, are fully under the control of these regenerative Pills, which act very kindly yet most efficiently on the tenderest bowels.—[Advt.]

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820524.2.8

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 644, 24 May 1882

Word Count
2,598

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 644, 24 May 1882

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