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THE SHIPPING DISASTER AT TIMARU.

[from our own correspondent;] [by telegraph.] Txmabu, To-day. Another victim has been added to the list of drowned. It has now transpired that George Falgar, a married man with a family, and who resided in Timaru, was one of the men in the lifeboat. A dog belonging to this poor fellow was seen hunting about the beach in search of his master yesterday and to-day, and this first directed attention to the fact that the man was missing. Several narrow escapes are recorded, and it is thought impossible to say yet whether there may not bo several others missing, for, in the .confusion that reigned when the boats put off, there is no knowing who was in them. Captain McDonald, of the City of Perth, is now out of danger, although terribly weak and exhausted, and all the other sufferers are progressing favorably, including Mr Blacklock, first officer of the City of Perth. And now as to the wrecks—the Benvenuo is a total loss, and is breaking up fast; sbe is offered for sale. The City of Perth is very little injured, and she all but floated at high tide last evening. It seems an immense pity that .a tug was not procured yesterday, as the vessel might have been, it is thought, pulled off. Ain inquest was hold last evening at the Ship Hotel, on the body of Captain Alexander Mills, late harbor master at Timaru, when a verdict to the effect that deceased died from the shock to his nervous system, caused by immersion in the sea, was returned. Numbers of people continue to visit the scene of the disaster, and business is almost at a standstill. Captain Mills will be buried to-day. The public indignation with the Harbor Board remains unabated, and a monster indignation meeting is talked about. There is no doubt that if the Board intimated their desire to vacate their office their resignation would be accepted. Telegrams of sympathy and condolence have been received here from all parts of the colony. Later.

Throe of the bodies of the drowned were washed ashore this morning near Whales Creek, about a mile and a half from Timaru, and beyond Peeress Towii. The bodies were conveyed to the Melville Hotel, in the Main South road, where they are now awaiting an inquest. Two have been recognised, but the third is so horribly disfigured as to bo beyond recognition. Emmanuel Neilson, a Swede,

formerly in the employ of tho Harbor Board, has a calm expression, and is- uninjured. D. M'Lean, carpenter on board the City of Perth, has been identified by J. Lynch, boatswain of the vessel. Neitson is recognisable, but has been much knocked about. The third corpse is supposed to bo that of Martin Bates, a land-ing-service man, but is so much knocked about that ho cannot bo positively recognised. Captain Mills, late Harbor Master, will bo buried this afternoon with Masonic honors. The scene of the wreck still attracts numerous visitors. There is nothing fresh as yet to wire respecting tho position of the vessels.

The following are the correct insurances, as far as is known, in the colony; on the City of Perth:—Standard, Swiss, Lloyds, and National, LSOO each; Union, Australian, Alliance, British and Foreign, L 2.000 each; South British, L 1,500. The Ben venue was insured in the Standard for LGOO, and in the Union for L 250.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820516.2.15

Bibliographic details

THE SHIPPING DISASTER AT TIMARU., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 637, 16 May 1882

Word Count
570

THE SHIPPING DISASTER AT TIMARU. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 637, 16 May 1882

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