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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 1882.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 430 p. m. j

Cable Interrupt ion. —We are informed that communication is interrupted on i.he Port Darwin line beyond Port Augustas. The line is expected I to be repaired ea rly to-morrow. Polios Court. -'-At the Police Court this morning, an inebriate' surrendered to his bail, and wan discharged, with a caution. This was the only b usiness. Lonqbeach Ro ad Disx axcr. The valuation lists for t ie sub-div isions of the Longbeach Road District—' iz., Wards Nos. 1,2, 3,4, aid s—art5 —art now open for inspection at thn Board’s office. The Wakatipu.- -It will b i seen from our shipping intellr ;ence that the Union Company’s s.s. Wal atipu arrived at Wellington at 1 a.m. t)-day, and went into quarantine, from w. lich she was released at 12 o’clock. Horticultural Exhibition. —An extraordinary meeting of the committee of the above is called for Wednesday next, at 8 p m., at the secretary’s office, for the consideration of a letter from the President in reference to the Art U nion. Found Dead. —A. man named Henry Thomas was found lying dead at the Barrhill Hotel, this morning. The matter was immediately reported to the police, and an inquest will probably be held. No further particulars had reachad us up to the time of going to press. Ashburton Woollen Factory.— A meeting of all interested in the above industry will be held at Messrs Poyntz and Co.’s office, on Wednesday, the 25th inst., at 3 p.m., to hear the report of the gentlemen appointed to inspect the machinery under offer, and other business.: A full attendance is particularly requested. A Racing Loss. —We learn that Mr Carter, of Grove Farm, Tinwald, has had the misfortune to lose his filly foal got in England by Catnballo, foaled at Middle Park, out of his imported mare Forget-Me-Not. The mare and foal were only removed from Middle Park on Tuesday last, and the death occurred the following night. The Late Rains. After a spell of very heavy rain, of between four and five days duration, the weather seems to have now cleared up for good, doubtless to the relief of the farmers. Yery little damage, however, has, so far as we can learn, resulted to the crops throughout the district. The Ashburton river rose considerably during Saturday, and also the Rakaia river, but no damage we believe has been done. Severs j houses in the town were flooded in con lequence of the sparrows’ nests stopping u p the pipes and gutters. Mr F. Clark ias been a great sufferer by these pests, ai id his stock has sustained damage through them on two occasions. Reaper and Binder Contest. The following is the result of the reaper and binder contest which was held at Burnside on Thursday lash, under tire auspices of the Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Association :; Twine binders Wood, 124 points, first, gold medal; McCormick, 121 points, second, recommended for silver medal ; Wood, 120 points, very highly commended; Howard, simplex, 116 points, highly commended; Deering, 114 points; Osborne, 113 points; Samuelaon, 101 points ; Excelsior, 99 points. Wire—McCormick, 104, first, and gold medal ; Aultman, 100, second; Osborne, 99. The work of all the machines was pronounced excellent. In the string binders Wood : beat Mcijlormick in strength, simplicity, machinery!, and ease of repairing same and time. McCormick was superior to Wopd in the nature of sheaf-cutting and delivery. Thtji difference was vyry sbght in all particulars.

Ashburton High School. —The above school will re-open on Thursday, January 26th.

Mount Somers Athletic Shorts. —A meeting of the Committee of the above is called for Saturday evening, 28th inst., at 8, at Hood’s Hotel.

Howard and Aultman Reapers and Binders. —A field trial of these machines is announced for Thursday next, in Mr Hay T. Smith’s paddock, near North-east Belt.

Ashburton Racing Club’s Autumn Meeting.— lt will be seen on reference to the report of the meeting of the above Club, held on Saturday afternoon last, he Autumn Meeting has been fixed for Ipril 19 arid 20.

School Committees. —The Annual Eleoion of School Committees throughout the jolony take place to-night, at 7 o’clock. A special meeting of the Ashburton School Committee will he held prior to the Annual Meeting to-night, for the purpose of receiving the report and balance-sheet for the past year.

Wreck of the City of Cashmere. — The enquiry into the loss of the ship the City of Cashmere opened at Timaru on Saturday morning, and at four o’clock was adjourned until Tuesday. So far as it has gone the enquiry shows that the wreck was the result of pure accident, and not of the inefficiency of the port.

A Proud Distinction. —From Reefton ■comes the tidings that John Callighan, a iocal bootmaker, has jumped 4ft lOiin, for a wager of L3O. This the telegraphic correspondent informs us “is the champion stnading jump in the Australian colonies, being half an inch over previous records.” What a proud man that Callahan must be !

A Local Firm of Home Shippers. —lt will be seen on reference to our advertising columns that Messrs Eriedlander Bros, have chartered several first-class iron vessels for despatch to England during the grain season. It is to be hoped that the farmers throughout the district will support the local firm in their venture, and that Messrs Freidlander Bros, enterprise may meet with the success It deserves.

A Vegetable Curiosity.— We have neen shown to-day a vegetable curiosity n the shape of a double cabbage leaf. The cabbage from which the leaf or leaves —for there are two distinct ones, only hat they spring from a single stem, reninding one of the Siamese twins—was ;rown by Mr H. Cape-Williamson, of Flemington. The leaves are some twenty nches in length, and broad in proportion.

; A Horror-Stricken Town. —Napier ileems to be full of horrors just now. On Friday last a woman named Hall made away with herself by jumping into the Tutaekuri river from a bridge. A verdict of “ temporary insanity ” was returned. Next day the wife of a well-to-do and well-known settler cut her throat, and is now lying in a most critical state. The sairie day—Saturday—two dead bodies were fished out of the Mohaka river, one was identified as one Lloyd of Kereopa, Svho disappeared mysteriously some days i .go, the other unfortunate is not known.

A Small Stowaway.— The little stowi .way girl named Rees, a most intelligent child of about 9 years of age, who by some means got on a boat prior to her leaving Nelson about a week ago, unknown to her Barents, and who was landed on the Wellington Wharf, where she was picked up liy the police, was forwarded to her parents cn Saturday night by the s.s. Wallace in charge of the master. The child states that she merely took the voyage for the purpose of seeing her sister, who is in service in this city.

; The Telegraph System in Australia jnd New Zealand.— Some interesting information respecting the development of the telegraph system throughout Australasia has been laid before the New South Wales Parliament by Mr James Watson, the Colonial Treasurer, from which it appears that in September last that colony had 13,689 miles of wire erected ; New Zealand, 9,587 miles; Queensland, 8,967; South Australia, 7,017; Victoria, 6,675; and Tasmania, 1,000. The revenue derived from telegraphs in I|BBo is stated to he as follows:—New South Wales, L 84.110; Victoria, L 85,459; New Zealand, L 73,002; South Australia, 155,132; Queensland, L 46,313; Tasmania, 17,422. More Than a Joke.— The practice of “ tin-kettling ” seems to bo carried to extremes in the Wairarapa, judging from the following letter to the Masterton Star : —“A respectable couple, as you are aware, h|id lately joined the bonds of matrimony, a;nd retired to their private residence from the town, to spend their honeymoon. Some time after the hour of midnight, a party of ruffians, led by a man and woman came to their residence and demanded a bottle of brandy and other refreshments, one of them forcing himself into the bedroom.. As the request of this lawless mob were not complied with, the foulest language possible was freely used by those wretches, accompanied by the throwing of billets of wood against the house and the breaking of the windows. It is to be hpped that the police will take some steps iri this wanton attack so as to bring the offenders to justice. I New Business. —Prom an announcement appearing elsewhere we learn that Mr J. C. Duncan, late accountant at the Ashburton branch of the Union Bank, has commenced business as a general commission agent, etc., in the premises lately occupied by Mr Ivess, auctioneer, Burnett street. Mr Duncan has been for a considerable period connected with the Bank, during which he has won the respect and esteem of very many people here. The position he held at the Bank is a guarantee of his fitness to conduct a business of his own, and we have no doubt that he will conduct that business to the entire satisfaction of his clients. Mr Duncan intimates that he has been appointed agent for Messrs Acland, Campbell and Co., auctioneers, Christchurch, and also that he is prepared to advance money on approved security in sums from LSO to L5,0C0. We are sure that Mr Duncan, in entering upon his new venture has the best wishes of all those who know him.

Quite Romantic. —A romantic story (says the Qundagai Times ) is related by Mr Ferdinand Gray, who has a claim at Upper Adolang. Prior to coming there he kept a wine shop at Temora. He was in want of a housekeeper, and all his efforts to obtain one failed, until one day he saw a good looking, respectable person, to whom he stated his want and offered her the situation. This she accepted, and accompanied Mr Gray to his establishment, where she was duly installed as housekeeper. Now, Mr Gray had a boarder, who was a handsome young man, and between the youthful pair there sprang up an intimacy, which quickly ripened into the grand passion. The young lady turned out to be the daughter of a squatter not far from Albury, and er ;itled to L 2,000 in her own right. Her m ther died some years ago, and some tit 10 before she met with Mr Gray her fa her had married a girl 17 years of age. Oi r heroine, not realising a stepmother of abiut her own age, cut her hair short, an i donning a suit of her brother’s clothes toi ik her departure for the Temora diggings, where she arrived safely having trs veiled 120 miles. Her gay Lothario is a 'l'ell-educated young gentleman, hailing frcluvGermany, and, like his lady-love, has a slimewhat romantic history. He fought a tluel, killed his antagonist, and as a consequence had to i flee from his fatherland. ~

Accumatisatiot.— The following extract from a letter recenlty received from London, written by a gentleman well known in Southland, may be (says a contemporary) of interest to the public, and of use to repress the verdant ardor of those visionaries who would endeavour to lessen ones acclimatisation pest by introducing other pests of a worse natnre. “ The writer has had a long interview with Mr Bartlett, the Superintendent of the Zoological Gardens, on the subject of natural enemies to rabbits. He says that 1 stoats ’ and ‘ weasels ’ would undoubtedly be the most suitable for your purpose, if only they could he imported into New Zealand, but they would hardly survive the voyage, for not only are they difficult to catch, but they worry and fret themselves in captivity. He thinks ‘ grisons ’ would come next. They would be difficult to get, as they are only found in Brazil. They are small, very active and vicious, and he thinks they would stand your climate. He spoke very highly of ‘ ichneumons ’ (spotted or gray), except ho thinks they might attack the lambs. They can be obtained in any number in Calcutta for about Is a piece. They make great havoc amongst all small animals, poultry &c., &c., and, like the ‘ grisons,’ they would follow rabbtis into their burrows ; they would also stand your climate, but lambs being naturally less active than rabbits, the remedy might prove worse than the disease. It might, however, be worth while to import a few only at first, and try them upon lambs. The writer thinks Mr Bastian imported some a few years ago ; he might be able to give some information. ‘ Polecats ' are much the same thing as common ‘ ferrets,’ and are unsuitable, as they simply kill to eat, and sleep as soon as they have gorged themselves. American ‘ badgers ’ would be too big, and, moreover, are not strictly carnivorous. I have since asked a game dealer to make inquiries as to the chance of obtaining ‘ weasels ’ and ‘ stoats. ’ He told me he has frequently been asked for them for export, but owing to the gamekeepers never allowing any such vermin to leave their properties alive, they are most difficult to procure ; in fact, he had once offered 21a each for them, but without success. ”

A Great Country. —A gentleman recently sent to America by the London Times to report upon that resources lately writes as follows :—“ Since 1876 America bias multiplied her export of live stock seventy fold ; she has tripled her export of fresh meat; she has more than doubled her consignment of tinned meats ; she has added one-third to the bacon, and nearly tripled the export of hams ; the annual export of lard is valued at L 5,500,000 ; butter, at L 1,000,000 ; cheese, at L 2,500,000.”

An Ark Built in Fear of Another Deluge.— A few miles below Otho, Alabama, there is an old negro named Moses, who claims he had a revelation from the Lord, in which he received information that the world would again be destroyed by water. He was so convinced that the destruction would be by water, that he at once began the work of building an ark. He has thus been engaged for several months, and the result of his labors may be easily seen from the river. The ark is very unlike the representations of the one built by Father Noah, and would doubtless not withstand any severe gales, such as might he expected in a cruise of forty days and forty nights. The oddly constructed vessel or house is placed on a high hill, ready for the rising water. It is composed of several apartments, about five feet wide and ten feet long, which are placed on top of each other. Each has a small portico and spires, with feathers as ornaments. Approaching the dwelling of the negro, one has to pass through a very elaborately decorated arbor, over the entrance to which are the words—“ Welcome, peace, rest and happiness.”

A Portable Electric Lamp.—Recently, while the mechanical section of the British Association were discussing the means of using the electric light in coal mines, Mr Swan, inventor of the “ Swan lamp,” made a remarkable statement. He produced an electric lamp of two candle-power, quite detached from any wire, and portable, which could be kept lighted for six hours by a two-cell Faure secondary battery. The weight of the battery would not exceed ten pounds, and to charge it afresh it would only be necessary “to place it for a time in connection with the wires of a dynamo near the pit’s mouth. ” The battery and lamp need never leave the pit. Sir J. Hawkshaw greatly approved of this lamp, and well he might. The germ of a portable and handy electric lamp, unconnected with any wire, and fed at intervals only as an oil lamp is, must lie in that rude specimen shown.

Who Would not be a Councillor ? —The West Coast Times publishes a schedule of amounts paid to members of the Westland County Council as travelling expenses during the past four and a half years. The principal items are : —Mr Dale, L 254 12s 6d ; Mr Seddon, L 284 4s 6d; Mr McWhirter, L 227 9s 6d; Mr Hirter, L 371 19s ; Mr Sandle, Llßl 10s. The Chairman’s salary for this term was LI, 125, and he was allowed buggy and horse hire to the tune of L 217 ss. These amounts (says the Times) form a grand total of L 3462 13s 6d paid to members of the Council by a grateful public during a term of four and a half years, or say an average of L9O per annum to each of the nine members during the term. It is a significant fact that the Council by six votes to three refused to allow the printing of the returns for travelling expenses.

A Curious Find. —Some workmen were making repairs in the roof of a house belonging to Mr John Stevens, of Broughton Astley, near Lutterworth, Leicestershire, a few days ago, when there was found under a rafter a bag containing 26 coins—crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and farthings. In date they range from 1670 to 1710. There are several crowns and half-crowns of the reigns of Charles 11. and William 111. The most recent is a coin of Queen Anne’s, bearing date 1710. The coins are in a state of good preservation. The house was formerly the manorhouse of the parish, where the family of the Astley’s, who have given the name to the parish, lived. It is now a farmhouse and public-house. Lighting Railway Trains by Electricity.—ln the early part of November the first attempt to light a train by electricity was made on the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway. A Pullman drawing-room car was fitted with twelve incandescent globes, which were illuminated by electricity supplied from about thirty cells of a Faure battery or accumulator, and left London for Brighton about four o’clock in the afternoon. The trip was a perfect success, the light produced being about three times as bright as there was any absolute necessity for. On the return journey to London about seven in the evening the members of the Iron and Steel Institute, who were visiting Brighton had an opportunity of travelling in the Pullman car, and witnessing this new departure in the comfort and delight of railway travelling. It is intended to light by electricity the new train, composed entirely of five Pulman carriages, whicli is to be placed on service between London and Brighton next month ; and the directors of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company and of the Pulman Car Company are to be congratulated upon being the first in the world to avail themselves of this new application of electricity, rendered possible iu the only train in England forming a promenade from end to end, and having one end of its carriages fitted up as a refreshment room open to all, the |pasaengora.

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 1882., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 541, 23 January 1882

Word Count
3,168

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 1882. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 541, 23 January 1882

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