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WOOLLEN FACTORY MEETING.

A meeting of the Provisional Directors in the Ashburton Woollen Factory Company was held at noon to-day. Present— Messrs Bullock (in the chair), Anderson, W. H. Horne, Joseph Clark, J. Ward, R. Mclntyre, S. Saunders. R. Friedlandor, C. Braddell, C. E. Fooks, W. H. Zouch, and S. E. Poyntz. The Secretary read a letter which he had received from England by the last mail, in reply to one which he had sent to the European Mail, in reference to starting a factory, as follows:—“ 49 South street, Huddersfield, England, November 2, 1881. To Mr Stephen E. Poyntz, secretary Industrial Association, New Zealand. Dear Sir, —I have just received your letter to the British Trade Journal, dated August 26. 1881, speaking very highly of your country as a manufacturing centre, etc., better in - fact than America, and calling upon skilled artisans and capitalists to come over to you. You give instances of proof of what you say by quoting the Mosgiel in Otago and the Kaiapoi in Canterbury, both woollen mills and doing a good business. I have lately been reading a book on New Zealand, and those mills are mentioned in those places, and 1 am very much impressed, what with this book and your letter to the British Trade Journal, to come over; but I cannot come till February or March, 1882, and I thought I would write you on this subject, and also ask you a few questions to give you an idea who I am and what is my avocation. Woollen mills and manufacturing is my avocation in all its departments, save that I am not so well up in weaving and designing as the other departments, and this happens in this way—l have been of late years in the yarn trade, that is making all classes of yarn for manufacturers, both at home and abroad. So that is the only reason why this part is not so fully developed as the other. I have just sold my plant of machinery (sets) and 4 pairs of self-acting mules, and it will take me till February or March next year before I can get my affairs settled and ready either to go abroad or do something else. My reason for selling out is that trade is so bad here and the prospects worse. I may be able to bring out a little capital, but how much I cannot just now say, but I shall not be able to bring out any machinery of my own. I am a young man—thirty-six years, of moderate education, and thoroughly master of my business. I have a wife' and one child, five years old. My oha-

racter will bear the s f rictest scrutiny, and I have been and ana member of the Methodist Church fo; upwards of twentytwo years, and very n sspectably connected. My object in writing to you is to ask you that for such a person is there an opening, or could I depend on an engagement directly after land ng ? Could Ibo helped with mom y to commence a place of my own at a jiven rate of interest? Is the climate hot or moderately so ? Can hands be got to work ; or how ? Could water power he got; or would it require steam ? I s hall be glad to hear from you as soon as i ever possible, and if your reply be favorable, and all is well here, I will come at once. As to the situation and position which I would be able to take, would be manager over the carding and spinningandprejparation departments, or, if required, would take the general management throughout; or, as I said before, to commence for myself, if I could be assisted. Upon an arrangement, I could bring out with me some workmen who were in my employ, who I know would go out with' me if desired ; but only on these conditions—that an engagement would take place at once, when they left their present situations, lam well acquainted with all the leading makers of machinery in this part of the country. •Better makers are not to be found in the whole United Kingdom of Great Britain, and if thought necessary could execute any orders in this direction given to me while here. It would be practical nonsense to bring over second-rate machinery to New Zealand, as the best would come at the same price an the worst, so far as freight is concerned. I simply name these things, just in passing, and to put you in mind in case anything should turn up in this direction and want immediate attention, which, upon an engagement, I would attend to. — l am, &c., : William; Haigh. ” The Chairman stated that the first business of the meeting would be to appoint a Committee to draw up a prospectus. The following gentlemen were appointed :—Messrs Saunders, Bullock, A. Orr, J. Clark, and S. E. T>oyntz. Mr E. G. Crisp was appointed solicitor pro. tern, the Union Bank of Australia (Limited) the bank of the Company, and Mr S. E. Poyntz Secretary. The following gentlemen were appointed to inspect the machinery now finder offer to the Directors on Thursday next : Messrs W. E. Leach, Thos.i Bullock, Wood, and Kemp. 1

It was decided that Mess rs W. H. Horne’s and Joseph Ward’s ‘names be added to the list of Provisional Directors.

The meeting then adjourned, and the Committee arranged to meet .at 5 p.m. this evening to draft the prospectus.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18820116.2.13

Bibliographic details

WOOLLEN FACTORY MEETING., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 535, 16 January 1882

Word Count
919

WOOLLEN FACTORY MEETING. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 535, 16 January 1882

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