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ORIGINAL POETRY.

The following little,song is presented to the young 'people’of Ashburton by the Wift&r* iiwith i: the ; compliments of the Bfesion and his kindest wishes : ’ '‘- h : >3 THE iMOXJSE’S ELEA- ' Are—The fine old English Gentleman, iirateu about a little mouse, I si , And what did her;befall: o-She'had:her dwelling in a house, J -i;’Or; rather, in a wall. ; ; u.iA cozy, little pest had she, Tntmd neatly round and round— ; nA happier mouse there couldn’t be In any country found. offobd shehad to eat, ,; it- JiAnd.-conld her palate please ; With many a sweet and dainty bit, Besides h6r bread and cheese. h Eut. stolen all—yes, that is true— She didn’t care for that;; A ThUlouly care Miss,Mousie knew Was, to avoid the, cat. ■,.. ■ It chanced a friend .invited her ft.-, Toiseei the world outside, a, And told her. of a heap of malt , o’iot’Which he had lately tried. ;r: , - And so the friends together went .3! Aftdffouadtheibrdwery near; And, being WobO prandial thoughts intent,” -.jo >ri. ■: • r They, never, thought of fear.. best .laid schemes, o’ mice and men- v. ' Gang aftkagee,” ’tia said; o !ourtnbUßieloßt her footing, then lost her head. ” 5‘ Foh/ creeping slyly up the way—"Oh, horror !—was the cat. ‘'jThe mousie jumped, and, sad to say, Went splash into a vat. ■ - ;.iAnd there she swam all round and iforav rouild, 'J ; -u. And very -tired she grew. .r She thought—- Oh dear! must I be <iidrowned! Whatever-shall I do ?” , She-d eaten of the malt her fill — ,o’jnßut. oh !" the horrid cat—--iShfe-now;drank beer against her will, Imprisoned in a vat. Then, looking up in blank despair, ■ •’St'ejsaw the cat’s great eyes; '. What wonffra'deaperate mbusie dare? She pjeaded in this wise—- “ O, pull me up, good Mister Cat,’ Tour worship I entreat; Gi'saVe'my life, and after that My body you; may eat. ” : “A bargain,” said the cat; “ so here, :‘ ; I’U‘sav dyborilffe, my httlfe'dear, '(Aside) And then I'll eat you raw.” Safe landed, mousie disappeared, Her woxd.aud promise broke;, For’iudden-death she greatly feared, ( And couldn’t see the joke. ■The cat expressed his deep disgust, And said—“ You little sinner, Come out and keep your word, you must ;; 'Notrobifaeof my dinner.” . “ The breach of promise,” said the :1 " ; . “ Jou cannot make a crime. Tgave’mywdfd/but then I was In liquor.at the time." • . • J/ C. Ashburton, 16th Dec., 1881.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18811222.2.19.2

Bibliographic details

ORIGINAL POETRY., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 515, 22 December 1881, Supplement

Word Count
386

ORIGINAL POETRY. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 515, 22 December 1881, Supplement

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