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OuR Christmas Story. Entries for the Christmas prize stories close to-raor-row at noon.

Ashburton Library Committee. —Mr John Orr has been appointed a member of the above, vice Mr Jacobson resigned.

Annual Meeting op Ratepayers.— Ihe annual meeting of ratepayers of the Wakanui Road District will be held on Jan sth for the purpose of receiving the annual balance-sheet, and the election of two members.

Journalistic. - Early in January a new weekly paper, to be called the Spirit of the Times, will make its appearance in Dunedin. The new venture will be started by Mr George Griffin, of the Colonial Printers’ Register. The Spirit of the Times is to be devoted to the interests of the working man. It will be an eightpage demy folio sheet, and its price 3d. We wish it every success.

Sporting. The handicaps for the horse races at Winslow will be found in another column. The handicappers were —Cup and Hurdle Races, Messrs Stitt, Carter, and Pullar ; Trot, Messrs Pullai and Stitt. Acceptances are due in the hands of the Secretary on or before the 28th inst. A committee meeting takes place On Thursday next. The acceptances fOr the Dunedin Cup also appear elsewhere. An open handicap of 10 sdvs. hds been added to the events at the Methveh meeting.

A Warning. —Diptheria is very prevalent in Hokitika and neighborhood. Four children died in one house at Kaneri lately. The hot dry weather, and the offensive state of the drains, are regarded as the causes.

Assault bya Bookmaker. —W. Weston, a bookmaker, assaulted the editor of the Observer on Saturday at Tattercal’s, Auckland, for publishing strictures on a certain section of southern bookmakers.

County Council. —Mr F. Main waring, clerk to the above, notifies that the offices will be closed from December 24th to January 3rd. Persons wishing to obtain renewals of slaughter-house licenses for 1882 should apply to the Council before Wednesday, January 4th, the Council’s next sitting.

Presbyterian Church. —This Church is undergoing a much needed internal decoration. When finished it should present a nice appearance. Mr J. R. Chapman, painter, of this town, is the magician whose brush is effecting the transformation.

A Pleasant Trip. —ln another column will he found an announcement by the Railway Department with reference to a southern holiday trip to Dunedin, Invercargill, and the Lakes, including Waimea plains. Full particulars will be found elsewhere.

Another Earthquake. —Between 20 minutes and a half past eight on Saturday night another shock of earthquake was experienced in Ashburton. But earthquakes are getting so common here now that they no longer excite very much attention.

Retiring from Business. —Mr J. Fowler notifies having disposed of his business in Tancred street, and he requests payment of outstanding accounts due to him.

Installation of Mayor. —The installation of Mr Donald Williamson as Mayor of Ashburton takes place on Wednesday next, at the Council Chambers.

Ashburton Sacred Festival. — Tonight the final rehearsal of the “ Messiah” will take place in the Town Hall. It is to be hoped that all the performers will be present punctually at eight o’clock, in order that the whole of the chosen choruses, etc., will be thoroughly rehearsed. We hear that a large number of tickets have been disposed of.

Police Items. —At the Police Court this morning, before Mr Robert Alcorn, J.P., four old offenders were charged in turn with drunkenness—viz., Edward Williams, William Fraser, R. Winter, and E. Cameron. The three first were fined 10s each, or in default 24 hours, and the man Cameron got off with a 5s fine, as a considerable time had elapsed since his last appearance at this Court. A first offender was discharged with a caution. On Saturday last George Digby, alias Tracy, who made his third appearance during the week on the same charge, was brought up for drunkenness and sent up under the new Act for 14 days, with hard labor, without the option of paying a fine.

Gas and Kerosene. —ln this issue the Borough Council invites by advertisement alternative tenders for lighting the streets with gas or kerosene for eight months. It seems absurd to think that we should even contemplate a return to the smoky and inefficient oil lamp when we have a flourishing local gas works. But if our gas company insists on demanding an extravagant rate for its gas, what is to bo done? Why, we must go back to the oil. Surely the Gas Company could afford to make some reduction in its prices to the Council when it is paying a dividend of 8 per cent., and talks about establishing a reserve fund. Mr Bullock caused some laughter the other clay when he said at the annual meeting that they must have a reserve fund, because unforseen circumstances might arise which would render such a fund necessary. They might have the electric light introduced here, for instance. There are things more improbable than that. If we are to use kerosene again the Council will surely never rest until it has rendered itself independent of gas.

A Poultry Fancier. —About thre 6 o’clock this morning the Rev. Mr Hands man-servant was awakened by hearing footsteps round the house, and lost no time in jumping out of bed to “learn further particulars” as the n ovapaoers say. Cautiously rccooooicreing he soon discovered a man busy at work killing the fowls and bagging the same with about as much coolness as if he had had a contract for the work. The servant, after gazing for a moment at the work of destruction, attempted to arrest the thief in the act, but the poultry-fancier being a bigger and stronger man than his antagonist, knocked him down and cleared before the alarm could he given, carrying the illgotten fowls with him. The police are investigating.

Devil Fish. — A very large devil fish was washed up on the beach near Patiti Point on Saturday. It was first observed by some boys who were bathing inside the reef, and who, to amuse themselves, began poking it with sticks, thinking life was extinct. That such was not the case, however, was soon proved, for one of them happening to place his foot on one of its arms, found himself caught, and had it not been for his companions, who by stoning the brute made it release its hold, he would probably have suffered severely. A man living near Peeress Town heard the screams of the boy and hastened to his assistance, but only arrived in time to see the devil fish being washed out by the tide. This man, who is our informant, says the arms of the fish must have been fully four feet long.— Timaru, JPerafd. J|

A Boy Speculator. —When the new roof was being placed on the old home of President Lincoln* fit Springfield, a young lad purchased the old shingles at five cents a wheelbarrow load. The boy then bought a scroll saw, and has since that time been employing his time in making ornaments from those old shingles. He is now selling them at from 50 cents to one dollar a piece. If that boy lives he’ll own a railroad. Nor Lost, but Gone to ’Frisco. — We hear, on good authority, that Captain Evans, who was supposed to have committed suicide at sea, is now in command of one of the largest steamers out of ’Frisco. When the Wakatu was searched for him, the ladies’ cabin was missed, and the gallant though too much married captain got safely off to ’Frisco by the outgoing mail boat. It is now known for a certainty that the tragic suicide never took place. —Manawatu Standard.

Positive Criticism. —lt is related of the late Mr Hope, the wealthy banker of Amsterdam, that he had bought a picture as a Rembrandt for ten thousand dollars. Finding that it did not quite fit the frame, he sent for a carpenter to ease it a little. While watching the operation he remarked how wonderfully the picture was preserved, considering that it was nearly two hundred years old. “ That is impossible ” said the carpenter. “ This wood is mahogany, and mahogany had not been introduced at that time.” Mr Hope burned the picture. A Boy’s Hair Turns Gray. —The Henry County (Ga.) Weekly says:—Several days ago Johnny Westhrooke, of this place, a lad of about twelve years, was running some cows across an old field, when he stumbled and came near falling headlong into a deep, uncurbed old well. He was very badly frightened, and on his return to the house related the cirourristance to his parents, telling them of the scare he had received. A few days afterwards it was discovered that his hair had turned from a very dark to an iron gray color, and no cause can be ascertained for it but the result of the severe fright. We have often read of such, but this is the first case of the kind that has ever come to our knowledge. Fiji. —We (Ellesmere Guardian ) have seen a letter from Mr J. G. Scott, late of Leeston, written from Suva., Fiji, by the last mail. The letter gives some interesting details respecting the island. Mr Scott does not concur in our description of it as one of the sunny isles of the South Pacific. He says that since he has been there it has rained foiir days a week; that the heat is not so intense aS he had been led to believe, but was a most oppressive kind of heat, like a vapour bath. Wages are high, carpenters getting from 16s to LI per day, and shopmen from L 3 to L 4 per week. There are no roads nor paths about Suva, to which place the Government intend to remove from Levuka, the present capital, about the beginning of the year.

Perseverance. —The Chinese have a capital illustration of the power of perseverance. One of their countrymen who had been making strenuous efforts to acquire literary information, discouraged by difficulties, at last gave up his book in despair. As he returned to manual employment he saw a woman rubbing a crow-bar on a stone. On enquiring the reason, she replied that she was in want of a needle, and thought she wonld rub down the crow-bar till she got it small enough. Her patience provoked him to make another trial, and he succeeded in obtaining the rank of one of the first three in the empire. This story may illustrate perseverance very well, but we cannot help thinking that if that crow-bar woman was to try the experiment now-a-days she would secure admission to a lunatic asylum in a remarkably easy manner. She Took Her Sister’s Peace. —Daisy Shoemaker, the pretty daughter of a farmer near Richmond, Va., had agreed to elope with Westland Pierce, but when the critical moment arrived she feared to transgress her parent’s wishes, and would not go to the rendezvous. Her sister Jane, two years her senior, begged her to keep her tryst with her lover, but all in vain. “ Well, if you don’t keep your word with West, I’ll do it for you,” she said, and indignantly leaving her sister, she got into the buggy and dashed oft’, despite the screams of her sister. Miss Jane reached the waiting place ; explanations were made ; and said she was willing to take her sister’s place. The lover, touched by her pluck, and captivated by her determination not to let the plan fall through, did actually marry her. Internatonal Exhibition, Christchurch. — Those that wish to be represented at the International Exhibition to be held in Christchurch in March next, should inform us of their intentions. We have been connected with all the Exhibitions held in the colonies. At the late Adelaide Exhibition we represented sixty exhibitors, for which we received ten special gold medals, forty-nine first and one second award, three of which were New Zealand firms (D. Strange and J. T. Martin, Invercargill, and T. Bevan, Wellington). Our plan is to represent the exhibitors, transact their busines, fix their exhibits on their space, attend to the judging of exhibits on their space, and anything necessary while the exhibition remains open ; at the close pack and send back exhibits or sell them, or duplicates thereof if required. It is very inconvenient for exhibitors to come to the Exhibition to fix their exhibits, which amounts to an expense, besides the loss of time which must necessarily be expended on them. Then, again, the exhibitors have a benefit, they have no trouble of getting space. They let us know how much is required, and wo get it for them, as we have a large amount granted to us. Wo fix the exhibits on a better space than if they applied themselves. Our terms are moderate. We specially caution the public against giving their exhibits to so-called Exhibition agents, who go the rounds of Exhibitions and run exhibitors into debt and other difficulties. On account of our not being able to give exhibitors the exact amount of our fee, as it is impossible to do so until we know the size of exhibit, they may rely on it being most reasonable. The exhibits should be addressed “ Albert S. Manders and Co., Christchurch Exhibition.” If exhibitors will kindly send a note stating how much space they require, no further trouble will be necessary.— Albert S. Manders and Co., British and Colonial Manufacturers, Agent. Hcvd office—9l Little Collins street East, Melbourne; and at London— St Paul’s Buildings; Adelaide—67 King William street; Perth, Western Australia; 6 Town Hall. Permanent branch in Christchurch after Ist of February.— Advt.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18811219.2.12

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 512, 19 December 1881

Word Count
2,274

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 512, 19 December 1881

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