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’Frisco Mail. —The Ashburton portion of the ’Frisco mail arrived per special train shortly after the express train from Christchurch this morning. A spark from the engine of the special set the tussocks in a blaze near the saleyards, but fortunately no great damage resulted.

Primitive Methodist Church. A Christmas tree and sale of fancy goods will be held at the above on Wednesday, Dec. 21st. Cheese and Butter Factory.—A notice appears elsewhere stating that the adjourned meeting of the directors of this factory will bo held on the 21st inst.

Wood’s Improved Twine Binder and Harvester —A trial of the above will take place on Monday, Dec. 19, at Mr Hudson’s farm. Wakanui, adjoining Mr John Cochrane’s farm.

Mayoral Banquet. —The newly-elected Mayor of Christchurch gives a grand banquet to celebrate his installation. Upwards of 150 invitations are being issued. His Excellency the Governor will bo present.

Alteration of Date.—lt is announced elsewhere that the time for receiving tenders for erection of shop and dwellinghouse for Messrs Andrewes Bros., has been extended till Wednesday next.

Christmas Luxuries.—Attention is directed to Mr Thomas Taylor's list of good things for Christmas. Mr Taylor is the proprietor of three grocery and provision warehouses in Christchurch, and delivers goods daily at the Christchurch Railway Station. His announcement appears in our advertising columns.

Methven Sports and Races .—ln our advertising columns will be found the programme of the Methven Sports and Races to be held on Monday, January 2nd next. Besides three races and tilting at the ring there are no less than seventeen athletic events, and the sports this year promise to be most enjoyable.

His Excellency the Governor —The Lyttelton Titties' special telegraphs : “ The Governor returns Home shortly probably in February, but will not formally resign until his arrival in England. There is now not a shadow of doubt that His Excellency was highly incensed at the action taken by Ministers on the native question during his absence.” Picnic.—The choir of St. Stephen’s and their friends to the number of about sixty, held a picnic party at Longbeach yesterday. Mr Grigg kindly placed his plantation at their disposal, and generously supplied' a quantity of fruit, etc. After spending a very pleasant day, three cheers were given for Mr and Mrs Grigg, and the party returned to town, arriving about 9 p.m.

Sale of Privileges .—Mr Alfred Harrison disposed of the privileges in connection with the Caledonian sports at his rooms to-day. There was an excellent attendance, and the sale resulted as follows:—No. 1 publican’s booth, Mr Sam, Brown, of the Central Hotel, L 23 10s; No. 2 publican’s booth, Mr Sam. Brown, Ll 9 10s, No. 1 confectioner’s booth, L2, Mr Taylor, confectioner; No. 2 confectioner’s booth, L2, Mr Taylor; gates, L4l, Mr Ryan. Cricket. The match, Ashburton County v. the West Canterbury Association terminated yesterday afternoon shortly before 5 o’clock in a victory for the Ashburtonians by four runs and four wickets. The day was anything but favorable for play, for the howling nor’wester which commenced on Wednesday continued to blow great guns all day, and rendered the game not a little fatiguing. The visitors returned home per express train.

Local Industries Association. —At the adjourned meeting of this Association, which is to be held on Wednesday next, the important question of starting a woollen factory in Ashburton will be discussed. We believe that a very complete plant, which can be purchased at a reduced price, is now under offer to the Association. We hope that there will be sufficient energy displayed to consider the matter thoroughly, and if it is found satisfactory, a start will be made in the direction of improving the position of the County as regards a manufacturing centre.

Ashburton Sacred Festival.—The date for holding this festival is now fast approaching and the members are actively engaged in practising their solos and choruses. With this issue the programmes are sent out, and from them will be seen the names of those ladies and gentlemen who intend taking part in the performance. We hope that our readers will endeavor to be present, as we feel sure they will enjoy the treat provided for them, and in doing so will encourage for the first time in Ashburton the rendering of the beautiful oratorio “Messiah.” A final rehearsal takes place on Monday evening next in the Town Hall, at which a full attendance of the performers is requested. Masonic Ball.—Last evening, in order to commemorate the first anniversary of the Ashburton Kilwinning Royal Arch Chapter, a most successful ball was held in the Masonic Hall, Tancred street. There were nearly 100 persons present. The spacious hall was very nicely decorated for the occasion by Bro. Sparrow, P.M., and the floor was all that could be desired by the most fastidious dancers. The music was supplied by Mr Schwartz's excellent band, anil it is almost needless to say the music in itself was sufficient to make the oldest of those present skip round with wonderful agility, combined with grace. Bro. Past Master W. H. Guudry acted as M.C. The catering was in the hands of Bro. A. Thiele. The indefatigable Hon. Secretary (Bro. H. Zander) worked hard to make the affair a success, and he deserves to be congratulated on the very excellent arrangements made in connection with the celebration of this anniversary. Dancing was kept up till an early hour this morning, and everyone appeared highly delighted with the whole affair.

Walkins Match for LIOO and the Championship of South Canterbury.— A walking match between two local peds I. J. Bradley and H, Lambert, for LSO aside, and the championship of South Canterbury, came off at Timaru yesterday. Both men were “ fit and well,” and their respective hackers were each sanguine of their man’s success, although Lambert with the general public was the favorite. There wore about 400 spectators present, who manifested a lively interest in the proceedings. The course was the usual one used at the meetings of the South Canterbury Amateur Atheletic Club’s gatherings, running outside the space reserved for cricket, and was a quarter-of-a mile round, so that twenty-eight laps were necessary to complete the distance. The men started at a very merry pace, Bradley leading slightly. At the close of the fourth lap, Lambert’s shoe came off, and his sudden stoppage caused Bradley to collide with him. Bradley, thinking Lambert had injured his leg in some manner, also stopped, but being urged to continue, did so, and by the time Lambert had started again was fifty yards in advance. Lambert made an effort to reduce this lead, but ineffectually, each succeeding lap falling further behind until half the distance had been completed, when Bradley overhauled him. Being thus a lap to the good, Bradley was content to walk behind his opponent for the remainder of the distance, which was completed in 62min 45sec. Bradley thus carried the day, although Lambert’s (backers entered a protest on his behalf, alleging that Bradley had caused him to stop by spiking him. The protest was not for a moment entertained however j.,:,

Christmas Holidays. —The railway department notifies that all ordinary single fare tickets issued oh Dec. 23, or up to January 3, will be available for return up to and including January 7. The Auckland Jack Sheppard.— Plummer, the Auckland house-breaker, has been already committed on several charges, while others are proceeding.

The Caledonian Society’s Mile Race. We are desired to supply an omission made by the handicappers in making up the handicaps for the Caledonian Society’s mile race, in which the name of Mr James Stevens was left out of the handicap list published. Mr Stevens runs at 40 yards from scratch.

The Late Sik Cracroft Wilson’s Property. Messrs Friedlander Bros, inform us that the whole of the sections comprised in the above not disposed of by auction the other day have now been privately sold at highly satisfactory prices.

The Wreck ot the Tar arc a.—The committee of the Tararua Relief Fund have wound up the affairs in connection therewith. The total receipts were Ll7O 13s 6d, of which LIOO is from the Union Company. The following was the distribution ;—Port Chalmers cases, Lll2 14s (the only cases of real want) ; Dunedin, Ll 43s 9d ; (Wellington, Ll2 10s; Oamaru, L 7 2s ; Auckland, L 6 ; Gore, L2 10s ; advertising expenses; Ll 5 13s 9d.

Sale oe Stock and Farm Plant.— In another column appears a preliminary announcement by Messrs J. T. Ford and Co., of an important sale of stock and farm plant, the property of the late Sir Cracroft Wilson, Hinds. The sale takes place on January sth, at the Tinwald Yards. Further particulars will appear in a future issue.

Going, Gone. —“ On the 4th September, a Birmingham auctioneer, Mr Fellows, was conducting a sale at Garrison-Lane, Birmingham, and was saying “ Going, going, gone !” previous to knocking down some articles, the floor gave away, and precipated a number of persons, including women some with children in their arms, into the cellar beneath. Several people were hurt.

The Sham Fight at Timaru.—Yesterday morning the Ashburton Volunteers mustered in strong force at the railway station, where they took the train for Timaru at 7 o’clock. The day was hot, and the strong nor’-wester blowing did not add much to the comfort of the expedition. However, a very jolly day on the whole was spent. The men returned home by the last train, and marched down town to the music of their band. Fortune Telling Extraordinary.— A short time since two young ladies near Camberwell were accosted by a gipsy woman, who told them that for a shilling each she would show them their husband’s faces in a pail of water; which being brought they exclaimed : “We can only see our own faces!” “Well,” said the old woman, “ those faces will be your husbands’ when you are married.” Banquet to the Hon. J. Bryce.—A banquet to the Hon John Bryce took place on Thursday evening in the Princess Theatre, Wanganui. Some 150 guests were present. The chair was occupied by Mr Robert Pharazyn, who proposed the health of the guest of the evening in a few eulogistic remarks. Mr Bryce, who was greeted with prolonged applause, said the people had been to his virtues ever kind, and he considered the present recognition .another another proof. He had never put himself forward for a public position unless in duty bound Referring to the late dift'cu.'ty with the natives, and to Ta Whiti, lie said they were at the mercy of a madman, and although the work had been carried out with great firmness, no harshness and no insult had bien offered to the natives. He believed he could have met the natives with a leas force, but the result would have been the committing of a great blunder to invite bloodshed. He therefore wished to augment the force by the Volunteers. Had one shot been fired, though by accident, there was no telling where bloodshed would have stopped. Referring to the Volunteers, Mr Bryce said he thought that their response to the call of duty had a very large significance. New Zealand had the misfortune to be colonised from many centres, which might have resulted in the non-development of a national spirit. The gallant response of some4,oooor 5,000 Volunteers proved that there was no lack of a really national spirit in this colony, which would increasingly develop. And while speaking on this point he would repeat what he had said in commendation of them at Parihaka. Mr Bryce resumed his seat amidst deafening applause, which had frequently interrupted his speech. He Couldn’t Do it. —After all, it appears that George Washington was not the first who said orally to his father in the garden one day, “Father, I cannot tell a lie.” A similar story about William Shakespeare, and in order to prevent confusion, we may as well give this version also. It runs as follows :—One day William Shakespeare’s father came home from Sheffield and brought with him a fine new axe. Young Will got hold of this axe and went and hacked a cherry tree. When his father discovered the damage done, he said, suspecting his son, “ Will, who did that?” Then Will, looking his father frankly in the face, said, “Father, I cannot tell a lie ; it was Ben. Jonson.”

Glass Clothing. —Glass weaving, according to report, seems to be gradually working its way into practical value. Wo have, from time to time, for several years heard of experimental efforts in the production of articles of dress or domestic use from woven glass, but now we read that a Pittsburg firm is manufacturing fabrics ihat are strong, cannot be ripped or torn, and are cheaper than those woven from linen, cotton, or silk. A large tablecloth of variegated colors, with ornamental borders and fringed edges, is on exhibition in New York city, which can be washed and ironed like the ordinary articles.

Big Shell Fish. Among the discoveries made recently in the Great Dead Sea of the West were some gigantic oyster shells, more than six feet long, each pair of which once contained an animal that the average boy could not lift. In other localities shells of but one valve were found 15 feet long, and each of these were inhabited by c cuttlefish that forced itself through the w.iU r by a method like that used to shoot a rocket up into the airand some authorities say that these cuttle, fish attained a length of even 30 feet. These long fellows had a long name, Orthocerotite, and they had a cousin, the Ammonite, which grew as large as a cart wheel. Such were some of the shells a thousand years ago; to-day the only really large shell is of the clam family. It is named Tridaena gigas, and is found in the Pacific Ocean, the length of its life being sixty or seventy years. It grows imbedded in the coral, and is fastened to the rocks by a cord called the byssus, which is so tough that it can only be cut with an axe. The shells themselves are six feet long, each valve weighing more than 2501bs ; while the animal part often weighs 30 or 401bs. When alive, the tridaena lies with its great valves ajar, capturing any food that may pass within the scalloped edges. A shark was once caught in this way. Swimming along in search of food, he unwarily passed into the doorway of the great clam’s house, his tail rudely striking the animal. Like a flash the tremendous jaws snapped together, squeezing the man-eater as if he were in a vice, and rendering him utterly powerless. As the tide went down the shark’s head appeared above water, thrashing about and churning up the sea. The hubbub attracted the attention of some natives, who soon captured both,, shark and clam, n r

Sound Counsel. —We clip the following from the New Zealand Presbyterian, which says :—“ It seems to matter little at present who goes to Wellington, so far as platform principles are concerned ; but it matters an immense deal that wo send men with vigorous brains, with good sound sense, with quiet tongues, with clean hands, and unimpeachable moral honor : and that we do not send any man that will bo a bore, wasting the time of the House with endless talk, or who is given to fads which create a reasonable fear that he is not sound in his head, or who has a private axe to grind, and who is an unexperienced adventurer, or whose life and character are not pure. This point of view for determining our votes seems all important to this country, and at this hour, and would probably glide the country to a better selection than hustings’ cries.”

How People Amused Themselves Seventy Years Ago. — A correspondent writes to Notes and Queries I remember one day, more than thirty years a «o, paying a visit to one of the dearest ofd ladies I ever knew—namely, Lady Scovell, the wife of Sir George Scovell, whom she had accompanied in his Peninsular campaigns, when he was one of the most useful and most trusted of ‘ The Duke’s ’ staff. I found her disentangling a number of ‘ cups and balls,’ the strings of which had been all mixed by a carpetcrawling urchin, who had upset the basket containing them. I was surprised at the variety of shapes and sizes. The balls had to be caught on common average cups, cups flattened almost to a table, cups cut away on both sides till only a crescent was left and, of course, the usual spike. On my asking her how she came by such a collection she told me that during the war she came home one winter to see her friends while the army was * in quarters,’ and while at home she got a letter from Sir Rowland (Lord) Hill, saying the weather was so bad they very soon could not get out, and he begged her to bring with her on her return any in-door games for himself and staff. Lady Scovell said she at once got these varieties of cups and balls and devils on two sticks made, and (having taken them to Spain), she added that 1 they answered the purpose admirably, but it was rather funny to see the General and staff in the afternoon, when the day’s work was finished, moving about the rooms hard at work at these games, and one backing himself against another.” ’

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18811217.2.11

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 511, 17 December 1881

Word Count
2,931

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 511, 17 December 1881

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