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THE FRENCH SOLDIER.

There |is a rather grim and even’ ghastly significance in the addition, which is just about to be made td the 1 accoutrements of the French soldier..; ; He is to be provided with a ticket of identity in the shape of a thin metal ni : plate, by which he may under any cif-w circumstances that can occur be readily i ; recognised. The name and ' regiment of the owner is to be engraved on each, and he will be expected to wear it con- . tinually while on active service. The object, of course, is that if the man should be killed, or so severely wounded as to be unable to speak, those who find him should have no difficulty in assigning to him his proper place ini the army, and making their report of . casualties accordingly. The possession ’ of this small plate, however, will .ceri . tainly dispose the wearer now and then to very sombre reflections. It may : be . compared to the dismal emblems which hypochondriacs and others are sometimes accustomed to keep about "them " —such as coffins arid Skulls, dr equally cheerless reminders of the fate in store for all of us. Whether this is a result , ; to be approved or deplored, and whether it will operate to make' the r. army a more or less popular service, is a question for philosophers and for the French Minister of War.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18811212.2.5

Bibliographic details

THE FRENCH SOLDIER., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 506, 12 December 1881

Word Count
233

THE FRENCH SOLDIER. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 506, 12 December 1881

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