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GENERAL ELECTION.

The result of the Wakanui contest was eagerly looked for last night. The Saleyards returns were not made up until seven o’clock ; the moment the result was known, Mr Ivess’ supporters gathered about the polling-booth and cheered most lustily, for it was apparent that their man had secured a large majority, that- was, so far as the Saleyards booth was concerned, but the rejoicings of the Ivessites was lessened when .all the returns came to hand, and the Guardian special made its appearance showing a majority for Wason of four votes. And the revised returns increased that majority to ten, the figures being (totals): — Wason ... ... ... 445 Ivess ... ... ... 435 Purnell ... ... ... 74

MR IVESS FROM THE BALCONY On his return from Eakaia, Mr Ivess addressed a few words to the crowd from the balcony of Shearman’s Hotel. He did not yet consider he was defeated. They had an Election Court to appeal to, and considering the disgraceful way in which the polling had been conducted at the Rakaia, he thought he would be perfectly justified in entering his protest against it Gross favoritism had been extended towards his opponents. To give them an instance of the unfair way the thing was conducted at Rakaia, he would tell them of one thing that had occurred. A man holding property at Malvern, and who was rot qualified to vote for Wakanui at all, was jet allowed to record his vote. He had to tender his sincere thanks to his indefatigable committee who had worked so hard to secure his return. What they wanted was a thoroughly impartial and independent Returning Officer, a man who would not be one-sided and blind in the execution of his duty. To give yet another instance of what had taken place at Rakaia that day. A man named Malley, but whose name appeared on the electoral roll as O’Malley, was not allowed to vote on account of the clerical error made in the spelling of his name. But what happened in Mr Edward Stafford Coster’s case ? Mr Coster had been registered as Edward Somerton Coster, instead of Edward Stafford Coster, his true name, and he had been allowed to vote unchallenged. Such a state of things was disgraceful, but he would fight it out, for he did not yet consider himself defeated. (A voice : “You may yet get in Joe!”) (Loud laughter.) Mr J. T. Fisher, of Christchurch, had also voted illegally that day, and had rendered himself liable to a fine of L2O, and Mr Wason was liable to a fine of a similar amount for aiding and abetting him. He would have more to say tothem to-morrow when the corrected returns were to hand. Minors, he might add, had been allowed to vote at Rakaia, and also aliens. He hoped he might yet break up Mr Wason’s majority, and that they would yet find that he was their representative. (Cheers.) They knew him well enough to know that what he took in hand he would ? see through. He would ask for three cheers for his committee throughout the town. The cheers having been given, Mr St. Hill proposed three cheers for Mr Ivess, which were heartily responded to. An attempt on the part of some friends of Mr St. Hill in the crowd to give three cheers for that gentleman broke down. Mr Ivess then retired, and on coming down into the street a bevy of his admirers surrounded him and carried him shoulder high to his office. Mr Ivess was evidently flattered by the compliment, but looked very uncomfortable nevertheless.

Christchurch North.—Thomson, 577 ; Andrews, 466 ; majority for Thomson, 111.

Christchurch South.—John Holmes, 673 ; John Anderson, 560 ; majority for Holmes, 113 ; 762 electors did not record their votes. Stanmore. —Out of the 1701 voters on the rolls of this new electorate, 1,048 recorded their votes yesterday. The result was as follows ;—Pilliett, 383 ; Cowlishaw, 362 ; Flesher, 303 ; majority for Pilliet, 21. Sydenham.—The polling for Sydenham resulted in the return of Mr W. White, junr., by a majority of 499 over the next highest candidate. The following is the record of the numbers ;—White, 662; Clark, 163 ; Treadwell, 111 ; Andrew, 70; majority for White, 499. St Albans.—The result of the polling was as follows :—Brown, 318 : Wilson, 168 ; O'Neill, 85 ; majority for Brown, 50. Out of 710 voters in this district, only 471 recorded their voles. Htathcote. —The polling resulted as follows Wynn Williams, 243 ; Hornbrook, 167 ; Fisher, 119 ; majority for Wynn Williams, 76. Lyttelton. Allwright, 259; Richard son, 248 ; Webb, 246 ; majority for Allwright, 11.

Kaiapoi.—Wilson, 510; Lee, 341 ; majority for Wilson, 179. Lincoln.—O’Callaghan, 277 ; Peryman, 154 ; majority for O’Callaghan, 123. Selwyn.—Hall, 467 ; Lockhead, 169 ; majority for Hall, 298. Ashley. Pearson, 446 ; Guild, 230 ; Dixon, 182 ; Cunningham, 112 ; Patterson, 19 ; Majority for Pearson, 216. Coleridge.—McMillan, 356 ; Enys, 141; Jebson, 118. Cheviot. MTlraith, 359 ; Saunders, 339; Fendall, 147 ; majority for MTlraith, 20. Geraldine.—Postlethwaite, 518 ; Wakefield, 483 ; Hayhurat, 63 ; majority for Postleth waite, 36. Timaru.—Turnbull, 413 ; Gibpon, 1.50 ; Partridge, 77 ; majority for Turnbull, 263. Peninsula.—Seaton, 298 ; Cutten, 284 ; Donelly, 203 ; Lewis, 54. Gladstone. —Sutter, 351 ; Fisher, 216 ; Anderson, 19 ; Newton 1. One return to come. Oamaru. —Shrimski, 396 ; Hassell, 337; Murcott, 122. Dunedin Central.—Bracken,34o; Cargill, 320; Bastings, ‘263; Dickscn, 76; Gi’aham, 43. Dunedin West.—Hon. T. Dick, 459; Stewart, 475. Dunedin East.—Green, 487 ; Davis, 470. Dunedin South.—Fish, 565; Ross, 283. Dunstan.—Pykc, 452 ; Frazer, 297. Four returns to cuno. Mount Ida.—DeLautour, 205; McKenzie, 177. Five returns to come. Olutaa.—Thompson, 172; Jowett, 187. Five returns to come. Mataura.—McKenzie, 145; Richardson, 143; Thompson, 94. Eleven returns to come. Hokonui.—Driver, 340; Cowan, 164; Finn, 66. Eleven returns to come. Wallace. Daniells, 216 ; Mclntosh, 192; Hirst, 181; Ellis, 133; Hodgkinson, 84; Johnstone, 15; Buttolph, 13. Five returns to come. Wakatipu. Fergus, 324; Thomson, 323; Mcßride, 36. Eight returns to come. Moeraki.—McKenzie, 464 ; Williams, 171. Tuapeka.—J. C. Brown, 482; G. F. C. Browne, 444. Bruce.—Rutherford, 549; Adams, 466; Murray, 411. Awarua.—Joyce, 526; Bains, 229; Smith, 104: Kinross, 48. Three returns to come.

Waitaki.—Duncan, 378 ; Reid, 329. Waikouaiti.—Green, 155; Thompson, 110. Three returns to come.

Thames.—Sheehan, 546; Speight, 529; majority for Sheehan, 17. Bay of Islands.—Hobbs, 525; Lundon, 294; majority for Hobbs, 331. Marsden. —Mitchelson, 245; Alderton, 223; McLeod, 86. Nine returns to come. Rodney.—George, 332; Shepherd, 180; Parnell, 2. Seven returns to come.

Waitemata.—Hurst, 421; Allison, 177. Eight returns to coine. ; Franklyn North. Buckland, 302 ; Luke, 183 ; Major Harris, 320; Gordon, 8. One return to come in. Franklyn South. —Hamlin, 192 ; Lawrey, 157. Six returns to come. Waipa.—Whitaker, 432 ; Jackson, 394; Johns, 237* Coromandel. —Cadman, 374 ; Brodie, 281; Mackay, 240. Five returns to come.

Auckland City North.—Peacock, 346; Rees, 320 ; majority for Peacock, 26. Auckland City East. Sir George Grey, 349 ; Clarke, 315; majority for Sir G. Grey, 34. Auckland City West. -Dargaville, 253; Fleming, 201; Wallis, 119 ; majority for Dargaville, 52. Manukau.—O’Rorke, 377; McGee, 162; majority for Sir G. M. O’Rorke, 215. Parnell.—Moss, 393 ; Monk, 205 ; majority for Moss, 178. Eden.—Tole, 451; Wood, 188 ; majority for Tole, 263. Wanganui.—Watt, 397 ; Ballance, 393. Napier.—Buchanan, 489; McSweeney, 114 ; McDougall, 187 ; majority for Buchanan, 302. Hawke’s Bay.—Russell, 233. lauranga.—Stewart, 267 ; Morris, 229; Kelly, 181. Nine returns to come. Picton. —Connolly, 357 ; Eyes, 311. Wairau. —Dodson, 550 ; Seymour, 381. Taranaki. —Trimble, 120; Colesby, 21. Seven returns to come.

Egmont. Major Atkinson, 737 ; Hutcheson, 400. One return to comeNew Plymouth.—Kelly, 328 ; Major Brown, 179. Two returns are yet to come in. There was great excitement last night after the result of the election was made known. Major Atkinson was driven through the town and cheered by the people. Thorndon.—Levien, 772 ; Dwan, 228 ; majority for Levein, 544. Te Aro.—Johnston, 397 ; Shaw, 342 ; Stafford, 321 ; majority for Johnston, 55.

Wellington South.—Hutchison, 470 ; Coffey, 390 ; Edwards. 257 ; Hendrey, 14 ; majority for Hutchison, 81. Hutt.—Jackson, 348 ; Mason, 300 ; Marks, 50 ; Sinclair, 15 ; majority for Jackson, 48. Rangitikei.—Stevens, 491; Fox, 489 ; majority for Stevens, 2. Wairarapa South.—Buchanan, 436 ; Bunny, 370 ; Boys, 199. Foxton.—Wilson, 315 ; Izard, 242 ; Buller, 228 ; Newman, 197 ; Russel, 198; Francis, 61. Two returns to come. Wairarapa North.—Beetham, 598; Renall, 340. Four ret urns to come.

Waimea.—Shephard, 359 ; Richmond, 190 ; majority for Shephard, 169. Tnangahua.—Weston, 716 ; Reeves, 516 ; McLean, 39. One small return to come.

Buller. —O’Connor, 402 ; Munro, 399. Four returns to come in.

Waipawa.—Smith, 588 ; Ormond, 563. East Coast.—McDonald, 403 ; Locke, 376 ; Gannon, 121; Porter, 151. Five returns to come.

Hokitika.—Fitzgerald, 576 ; Reid, 414. Several returns to come. Greymouth.—Petrie, 757 ; Guinness, 599 ; Madden, 2. Kumara. —Soddon, 763 ; Blake, 623. Roslyn.—Bathgate, 341 ; Scott, 327 • Hodgkinson, 249.

DECLARATION OF THE POLL FOR THE WAKANUI SEAT.

The official declaration of the poll for the W_akanni seat took place at the County Saleyards to-day at noon. Some 200 people were present. Mr George Jameson, Returning Officer, read out the returns, the totals giving Mr Wason 445, Mr Ivess 435, and Mr Purnell 74 votes. He then declared Mr John Cathcart Wason duly elected. The announcement was received with cheers.

[ Mr Wason now got upon the table and addressed the assemblage. There was one i thing he was sure they were very heartily t glad of, and that was that this election i was now over. (Applause and laughter.) ; He had entered the contest with no personal feeling whatever, he had in fact merely come forward at the request of a i number of settlers, who, fancying that his , views were identical with their own, had ; asked him to become their mouthpiece, i It was, he could assure them, no more a ; treat to him to go to Wellington than it ; would be to any one of them. The going there would necessitate his quitting his ; farm, and leaving private affairs to look , after themselves while he was away. He must protest against an article that appeared in that morning’s Muil, reflecting on the Returning Officer at Rakaia. Now, i if one man picked another man’s pocket or injured him in any other way, he had 1 his remedy at law for such injurj, and if the Rakaia Returning Officer had been guilty of the conduct imputed to him, those who were the sufferers had their legal remedy. If Mr Boyle had acted unfairly, he should be made to suffer for it, but it was grossly unfair that his conduct should be criticised and condemned beforehand in the public press (loud applause). To his committee and all who had worked for him, he (Mr Wason) returned his sincerest thanks. To secure his return his committee had put up with much personal inconvenience, and had sacrificed time, and he dared say money too. Again, he would thank them and all who had been instrumental in securing his return, and he need hardly assure them that he would do his best for the constituency he had won. (Loud applause.) Mr Joseph Ivess then mounted the table, and observed that the hour had coma, but not the man—the man, that was, who was likely to ably represent the constituency of Wakanui in Parliament. He (Mr Ivess) had been stripped of his rights to a large extent by the partiality displayed by Mr W. R. Boyle, Returning Officer at Rakaia, and the unfair conduct of MrO. B. M. Branson, thecauvassor employed hy Mr 0. W. Parnell. There was such a thing as the Corrupt Practices Bill, but it was as easy, apparently, to drive a a coach and four through that Bill, as it was through some others. His opponents had worked strenuously to effect his defeat, but for his part, he failed to see what he had done'to deserve this bitter opposition He had always striven to do his host in the interests of the farming comai ■ y throughout the district, and he would continue to do his best so long as ho remained amongst them. (Apply use.) He did not consider that ho was yet defeated. (Applause.) After alluding in bitter terms to the special train of yesterday, Mr Ivess (pointing to Mr C. B. M. Branson) said—- “ Here is a man who has been maligning my character everywhere for the last six weeks.” (Applause and laughter, in which Mr Branson joined.) His best thanks were due to his committee for their indefatigable efforts to secure his return. Ho had been swamped by some bogus

votes from Christchurch, but he meant to fight the election out, take it to the Electoral Court, and have it thoroughly investigated. The Ashburton Returning Officer’s partner had been canvassing the district against him, lu> might inform them, and this he considered another most unfair proceeding. He was sorry that a Liberal candidate had not been returned yesterday for Wakanui, but was pleased to see that the Liberals had been victorious elsewhere. To show the contemptible tactics resorted to by his opponents yesterday, there was a cry got up at the booths that Mr Purnell had withdrawn from the contest in favor of Mr Wason. The cry had been got up by Mr Wasou’s own supporters. As a further instance of the opposition he had met with, he could assure them (on information of Mr James Wilkie) that that gentleman had been offered payment by the Guardian to write him (Mr Iveus), down.

Mr Fisher, of the Guardian office,- had been delegated to interview Mr Wilkie and offer him one guinea per article to write damaging articles respecting him (Mr Ivess). [We need hardly state that Mr Ivess allowed his imagination to run altogether away with him in making this ridiculous statement.] To return to the electoral roll, minors and aliens had been allowed to place their names on that roll, and to vote at the election yesterday, but he took it as a very high compliment, that despite all the opposition he had met with there were men who had walked twenty and twenty-five miles to vote for him. Before he concluded his remarks he would wish to draw attention to the curious circumstance of his minority of four last evening having become a minority of ten this morning. He would hand the protest he now showed them to the Returning Officer, and take that opportunity of remarking that he meant to prosecute the enquiry into the way this election had been conducted in the fullest possible manner. He possessed a list of illegal votes recorded at Rakaia yesterday, and could say that in several instances the same voter had voted ‘more than once, although not qualified to do so. He had always been a faithful ally of Liberalism, and striven to promote and encourage it. Before concluding he would like to mention one other circumstance. About a month prior to the dissolution he had written to Mr E. G. Wright asking which electorate he proposed to stand for—Wakanui or Ashburton, as he (Mr Ivess) did not wish to become the opponent of Mr Wright; Mr Wright had said that he had not decided, that he must take time to consider, and would let him know, but up to that hour Mr Wright had never sent any reply to the enquiry. (A voice: “ Perhaps he forgot it. ” Laughter.) After once more thanking his supporters for their efforts in his behalf, and reiterating that he did not yet admit defeat, Mr Ivess descended from the table amidst applause. Mr Purnell said that while he regretted his position at the poll he was not surprised at it, as he had been compelled to fight the election under great disadvantages, some of which were known to the public and others not. He had nothing to complain of with regard to the conduct of Mr Wason, who had acted fairly enough, but some of Mr Wason’s supporters had acted neither fairly nor honorably towards him (Mr Purnell). [Cheers]. He regretted that the electorates of Coleridge and Wakanui should both be represented by large landholders. He would do no injustice to the large landowners, but thought that they and the large monied institutions were, not the. proper parties to rule the colony. The party to which Mr Wason belonged had done great mischief to the colony in the past and would doubtless do great mischief in the future unless a sharp eye were kept upon its proceedings. [Cheers.] _ Mr Wason really represented not the majority but the minority of the constituency, as could easily be seen by adding up the votes polled ,for the two unsucessful candidates, comparing the total with the number polled for the successful candidate. Mr Wason really owed his success to the action of a number of his (Mr Purnell’s) supporters', who had deserted him on the very eve of the poll, and voted for Mr Wason ; not that they loved Mr Wason much, but they disliked Mr Ivess more. Mr Wason must henceforth regard him Mr Purnell) as his political opponent. (Cheers.) He should endeavor to create a Liberal party in the constituency, whose efforts would be directed to wresting the representation of the district out of the hands of the Conservatives at the next election. Socialistic views were a mistake. If put into force, the poorer classes would suffer most from their operation, and their advocacy frightened away many men who would otherwise rally round their standard. They need not be discouraged at their want of success at the present election. He disapproved of the attacks which had been made upon the Registration and Returning Officers during the present election ; nor was it proper that assertions should be made on a public platform to the effect that certain persons had voted twice on polling day. When a candidate was beaten he should take his beating quietly. If either of the candidates had reason to be angry it was himself, but his equanimity had not been at all disturbed, and when the messenger brought the result of the poll to his house he (Mr Purnell) was fast asleep 1 (Laughter.) He thanked those who had voted for him, and hoped they would be more successful next time.

This brought the proceedings to a close, and the crowd dispersed.

Complete returns from the following districts have been received. M stands for Ministerialist, O for Opposition, and I for Independent : Bay of Islands—F. Hobbs ... ... M Auckland North—T. Peacock ... M Auckland West—J. M. Dargaville ... M Auckland East—Sir G. Grey ... O Newton—W. Swanson ... ... M Parnell—F. J. Moss ... ... ... O Eden—J. A. Tole O Manukau—G. M. O’Rorke ... ... 1 Thames—J. Sheehan ... ... ... O Waikato—J. B. Whyte ... ... M Napier Borough—John Buchanan ... O Rangitikei—John Steven ... ... I Manawatu—Walter Johnston ... M Waitotara—John Bryce ... ... M Wanganui—W. H. Watt M Hutt—H. Jackson I Te Aro—o. Johnston... ... ... M Thorndon—W. H. Levin M Wellington South—W. Hutchinson... O Nelson—A. H. Levestam ... ... O Waimea—J. Shephard ... ... O Inangahna—T. S. Weston ... ... M Cheviot—FL Mclllraith ... ... M Ashley—W. F. Pearson ... ... M Avon—W. Rolleston ... ... ... M Kaiapoi—lsaac Wilson ... ... M St. Albans—J. E. Brown ... ... I Stanmore—W. H. Pilliet ... ... 0 Christchurch North—H. Thomson ... M Christchurch South—John Holmes... O Sydenham—W. White ... ... O Heathcote—Wynn Williams... ... M Lyttelton—H. Allwriglit ... ... M Lincoln—A. P. O’Gallagh.ui... ... M karoa W. Montgomery ... ... <> Sclwyn—John Hall ... ... ... M Coleridge—D. McMillan ... ... M Ashburton—E. G. Wright ... ... M Wakanui—J. C. Wason ... ... M Geraldine—W. Postlethwaito ... M Timaru —R, Turnbull... ... ... () Dunedin West—T. Dick M Dunedin East—M. W. Green ... I Peninsula—J. Seaton... ... ... O O.imaru—S. G. Shrimski ... ... O Moeraki—J. Mackenzie ... ... 0 Tuapeka—J. G. Brown 0 Bruce —James Rutherford ... ... M Dunedin Central—T. Bracken ... O Dunedin South—H. S. Fish ... ... M Roslyn—J. Bathgate ... ... ... 0 Port Chalmers—J. Macandrew ... O Taieri—J. Fulton M Caversham—W, Barron O

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

GENERAL ELECTION., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 505, 10 December 1881

Word Count
3,217

GENERAL ELECTION. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 505, 10 December 1881

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