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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prevalebit. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1881. The Effect of the Irish Land Act.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 4.30 p. ru.. j MB^eaap—nawmiwn—«M.nwiimm«iii UMiime— vmm

Hitherto the results of Mr Gladstone’s just and liberal Irish Land Act have not been equal to .what most people hoped for and anticipated. The landowners have wisely; acquiesced in the curtailment of their legal rights ; blit disorder and outrage have not ceased on the part of the people, and of| course Messrs Parnell, Dillon, Davitt and the rest of the noble leaders who make their living by agitation are not conciliated. A few cases have been brought for adjudication before the' newly-constituted Land Courts, but as the mob leaders have ordered that the appeals shall in future be restricted to those Cases in which the applicants would be sure beforehand to be dissatisfied with the decisions, a still fewer number of cases will be likely to be tested in future. For the mass of the ignorant peasantry and small farmers there is this excuse, that they can scarcely imagine a reign of justice for fifty years after their country has suffered an oppression of five hundred years. As for Mr Parnell and his fellow-conspirators, they will not willingly annihilate themselves by becoming peaceful and useful citizens, and standing before the world on their own merits as ignorant and shallow nincompoops. They live by quackery, and the trade thrives even when they dre in gaol. Yet the Act has not been useless, a wise and good thing never is. It has shown already to many Irishmen that the Gladstone Ministry, and the majority of Englishmen and Scotchmen, are quite ready to concede all their just demands. Sir Charles Gavan Duffy, a gentleman whose patriotism, independence, and ability no Irishman will question, has pronounced in its favor, and the- Roman Catholic bishops in a body have recommended that it should be accepted and acted upon. The opinions of such men cannot fail to have considerable weight with all thinking Irishmen, and those who are not convinced at once in the heat of a party struggle will probably be, before many years are over, that the Irish Land Act of xBBi was a grand reform. On the continent of Europe, also, politicians will no longer be able to point the finger of scorn at England’s liberal statesmanship, and compare the treatment of Ireland to that of Poland by Russia, or of Greece by Turkey. Such taunts henceforth vould simply have no meaning. Perhaps the only parallel case in the present day is the treatment of Hungary by the present Austrian Govern ment, and even there true Liberalism has not gone so far as to make equally large concessions.

Agitation against the law of the land now in Ireland is merely agitation for the right of robbery and murder; and any Government which tolerated those would deserve to be set at defiance. Happily the Gladstone Ministry have lately shown that they know how to be firm and energetic as well as just and beneficent, and the unhappy country seems to be slowly subsiding into a state 'of repose.

That Printer Again. —We regret that, through a t ypographical error, the reference to the dressmaking department in Mr S. W. Alcorn’s advertisement should be misleading. Operations in the dressmaking department should read, “Monday, the 12th inst.,” instead of 21st. “The Miller and His Men.”—ln consequence of the unavoidable absence of one of the members who impersonates a leading character in the above play, the performance has been postponed to Monday and Tuesday next. Rakaia R.M. Court. —Mr O’Reilly desires us to state that he will be in attendance at the R.M. Court, Rakaia, tomorrow.

Narrow Escape. —What might have proved a very serious accident occurred this morning to two men engaged in removing the condemned engine-shed. A portion of the building was being lowered by means of a block and tackle, when the rope breaking, the whole thing came to the ground. Patrick Menchan received a severe blow from: the block falling on his head, and Alex. Gollan was somewhat bruised and scratched from coming in contact with the falling debris. Important Property Tax Judgment. —ln the Appeal Court, Wellington, yesterday, the case of 0. M. Crombie (Deputy-Commissioner of the Property Tax) v. E. Pearce and another, trustees in the estate of the late Charles Sharp, was | argued. This was a special case, stated'- for' the Supreme Court to decide whether the Property Tax for the year commencing 1880 should be assessed and charged upon the present value of the whole trust fund and estates vested in and held by the defendants as such trustees, or only upon the present value of the life estate and interest of the testator’s widow therein. The Court held that the tax cowlft only be assessed upon the (latter, • and gave judgment for defendants.' :n,r,q • Jibuti

Ashburton Bridge. —The above bridge will be closed against all traffic on the night of Dec. 8 (to-morrow), for repairs.

To Persons Suffering from Corns.— Mr G. E. Stacy, the Electro-Biologist, has been staying for the past few days in Ashburton, and has been particularly successful in bis treatment of those suffering front corns. He has effeeted a number of cures, and hifl treatment is perfectly painless. He leaves Ashburton this evening for Christchurch.

Masonic. —At the regular meeting of the St. John’s Lodge, last evening, a very interesting lecture was delivered by Bro. the Rev. A. W. Hands, the subject chosen being “Light.” Bro. C. Hogg also read in a very impressive manner, a paper on the “ Gaul.” At the conclusion ot both, hearty thanks were accorded by the brethren present. A NoVel Industry. —A private company has started a patent chicken incubator ay hot water process at Glendermid, Otago. The thing promises to be a great success, and it is claimed that 40 per cent, more chickens can be successfully reared than by the hens’ old fashioned method. A machine is now being constructed to fatten the birds for market, as is done in America and France. Sunday Grog Selling. —A test case was heard at the Police Court, Dunedin, yesterday, against Watson, a publican, to settle whether under the new Act hotels must be kept closed on Sundays. The facts, as admitted by the defendant, were that the door was open, that there was access to the bar by that door, and that a person was behind the bar prepared to serve. It was argued for the, defence that the Act contemplated keeping open for sale to travellers, etc. The case was adjourned till to-day, when (we learn by telegraph from a correspondent) the Bench decided that the Licensing Act does not prohibit the keeping open of the door of an hotel, or access to the bar, or a person being there to serve travellers.

Promenade Concert’. —We would remind those of our readers Vdlci aro invited to the Promenade Concert which takes place to-morrow evening at Mr H. J, Weeks’ new brick premises in Tancred street. A capital programme has been arranged,■ and those who wish to inspect the capital stock of pianos and other instruments in the Ashburton Music Saloon, and to hear good music, should avail themselves of Mr Weeks’ invitation to be present. A full report of the premises will appear in our next issue. The Wairarapa North Election.— A private correspondent of the Dunedin Star, wiring from Masterton re the above election, says : —During mass at the Roman Catholic Church yesterday, Father Halbuachs in strong language denounced Mr Renall, one of the candidates, for Wairarapa North, and told his congregation that they must vote for Mr as Mr Renall had got the funeral service performed over one of his family by a Protestant clergyman, although the, deceased was baptised by a Catholic priest.. In the evening Father Halbuachs denied a rumor that he had applied to Mr Renall for money before performing the funeral rites. The priest’s conduct has excited

much comment. To Members of Friendly Societies,

An important Friendly Society’s case was

decided at Nelson yesterday. A man named Harris injured his left hand by a gun accident, necessitating the amputation of one finger, and he was attended at the

hospital. On being discharged from there, he went under the surgeon of the Court Robin Hood (Foresters), who ultimately declared him off the funds, and his sick pay was stopped. Harris brought an action against the Court to

recover further sick pay, alleging that he couldinot follow his avocation of engineer. The Court stated that Harris had been

engaged as a dealer and agent, and that he was able to follow those or light employments. The Magistrate held that employment necessarily did not mean that employment to which a man had been brought up, and that the plaintiff was shown to have been able to carry on the work of a dealer from the time he was declared off the funds. Judgment for defendant, with coats.

Treasure from the Deep.— Many years ago, says the Dover Sentinel, there was an' English barque wrecked on the pitch of the Cape by the name of Arbutus. Part of the old wreck can be seen now

at very low tide. Recently two men from town were there digging “razor blades.” They were digging just at the

stern of the wreck, where one of them struck something which proved to be an old, dilapidated zinc box, having the appearance of a sardine can. On washing and opening it he found that it contained gold to the amount 1,000 dollars in doubloons. There are in all probability more cans of money surrounding this wreck, and it is supposed 2,000,000 dollars in English money went down with this vessel. What Drink Abused can do. A touching story comes from Auckland. On one night last week there were eleven persons in the cells, charged with this oflbace. One of those locked up was the drunken wife of a hard-working man, who is wholly unable to control her conduct. Last night three of their wretched children barefooted, poorly clad, and wet—came to the station, the elder one, a girl about ten years, carrying an infant child wrapped up in a worn shawl. Her request was that the infant might be given to its mother in the cell, as neither father nor children could nourish it in her absence; The request was kindly complied with by Mr Purdy, and the two other children then left for their wretched home.

A Printer’s Career. —A movement has been set on foot, says the Printing Times, with a view to do honor to Dr William Chambers, on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the existence of Chambers’ Journal, the first number of which appeared on the 4th February, 1832, The history of the two brothers Chambers reads like a romance, and few persons could realise from how small a beginning their present colossal concern arose, if we had not their own word to vouch for its truth. The career of the surviving brother, Dr William Chambers, is especially full of interest for printers. Just sixty years ago he t.ct up as a printer, without having been taught the rudiments of the compositor’s craft. The total cost of the plant with which he commenced business was L 3, which facts lends force to Dr Chambers’ own words, that “nothing more primitive had been attempted since Gutenberg made his rudimentary efforts in the art of printing.”

Something Like a Clock. —A native prince of Upper India is said to possess, and jealously guard as the rarest treasure of his luxurious palace, the most astonishing thing ever heard of in the way of a timepiece. In front of the clock’s disc is a gong, swung upon poles, and near it a pile of artificial human limbs. The pile is made up of the full number of parts of twelve perfect bodies, but all lay heaped up together in seeming confusion. Whenever the bands of the clock indicate the hour of one, cut from the pile crawl just the number of parts need to form the frame of one man, part joining itself to part, with quick metallic click ; and when completed, the figure springs up, strikes one blow that sends the sound pealing through every room and corridor of that stately palace. This done he returns to the pile, and falls to pieces again. When two o’clock comes, the two men arise and do likewise ; and so through all the hours, the number of figures being the same as the number of the hour, till at noon and midnight the entire heap spring up, and, marching to the gong, strike one after another - each his blow, and then fall to pieces, ‘

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18811207.2.13

Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prevalebit. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1881. The Effect of the Irish Land Act., Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 502, 7 December 1881

Word Count
2,134

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prevalebit. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1881. The Effect of the Irish Land Act. Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 502, 7 December 1881

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