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Holloways Ointment -and Pills.— Notable Facts.—lntense heat augments the annoyances "of skin disease and encourages the development of febrile disorders; therefore they should, as they can, be remove by these ’detergent and purifying - preparations.! In stomach complaints, liver affections, pains, and spasms of the bowels, Holloway’s ungent well rubbed over the affected part immediately gives the greatest ease, prevents congestion and inflammation, checks the threatening diai-rhoea and averts incipient cholera. The poorer, inhabitants in large cities will 1 find these remedies to be their best ijnends when,any pestilence rages, or when- from unknown - causes eruptions,; boils, abscesses, or ulcerations point out - the presence of taints, or-impurities within the system, and call for' instant and effective curative.: medicines. [Advtj "• J

ADVERTISEMENT. I “X am the Lord, and-inhere is: none else.” !w j IT is very suggestive of .’the ..depths to which human nature has sunk that the best thing in the world, and the only . really important one, is the one that meets with most indifference, not to say contempt. And yet the state of . things in this world, if looked calmly and impartially into, would lead a reasonable : being to think that if religion, as revealed in the Word of God, were non-existent, then this world is a very meaningless affair, and all those most abstruse of things that form the finer, more subtle, and most wonderful parts of the human character are inexplicable, and without real purpose or object in this world. Can such a state be reconciled with the wisdom .displayed in all other matters? Take the sciences, we find that Astronomy, Natural History, Chemistry, eta , just in proportion as they are understood, just as strongly do they - bring out the fact that there is wonderful meaning, method, adaptability, arrangement, unity, organisation, and object in each of these sciences. If such is the J case' with regard to inanimate matter, are we to be asked to believe that in the noblest animate being—man, there is in the workings of those highest of all faculties, the spiritual, the attributes of the soul, the attributes which alone placeman most quickly in a superlative position in the world, I ask, are we to believe that these are meaningless, purposeless, and therefore useless? Or, if they have an object, is that object to be hidden from us in this world? Are these spiritual faculties, unmistakably existing in us, given us whilst in this world, to have no beneficial purpose or result in our life here? Or are we to drag them with us through this world, allowing them to pro-. duce on even the most indifferent a certain amount of uneasiness, uncertainty, and a corresponding loss of temporal happiness, just , so that they .will ; be on hand wjth us in the next world, to serve that end itrhich iii-.fdbas world we are, asked' to believe is unascertainal ler ‘ 1 T submit that the Supreme Bein» who created those things, the study of' we call astronomy, chemistry, etc. j could not have outraged the Divine attributes in such unmeaning work in ’ connection with BKs greatest work, man, as the acceptation of this view would demand of us. And being thoroughly convinced of it', 1 .. submit r farther, what must be more or " less evident to any rational being, that as man has a physical stomach, the belly, as he has an intellectual stomach, the mind, and so he has also, a spiritual stomach, the soul, as there is a certain wholesome food for the body, and intellectual food for t?c mind, so also is there provided in this •' world spiritual food for the soul. Look where you will in the world, you will find - ' this, spiritual stomach, and it is demanding food of one kind or or another everywhere, it must be filled with Protestantism,' Homan Catholicism, Mahommedanism, the system of Cobfuniua’/j the Greek, Church, idolatiy of ajltMrids, all these “ foods ” have millions of stomachs depending on them for spiritual sustenance. This universal desire, or 'instinct, of worship is as raid as are intellectual and physical requirements. spiritual want, ■. would God ■WnMH... s ... -

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18811105.2.17.1

Bibliographic details

Page 4 Advertisements Column 1, Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 494, 5 November 1881

Word Count
680

Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 Ashburton Guardian, Volume III, Issue 494, 5 November 1881

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