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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas, et Prevalbeit. TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 1881. Chinese Immigration.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 410 p.m.]

The Chinese ‘lmmigration Bill,' the second reading of which was carried last week, though it will not satisfy either of the two extreme parlies on the “ yellow agony ” question, offers nevertheless a judicious compromise between the two. Those who, like Dr Wallis, are of opinion that Chinese are quite as eligible colonists as Europeans, must of course, in consistency, regard the Bill as a piece of narrow-minded and ignorant exclusiveness. _ On the other hand, the self-constituted advocates of the so-called “ working man” —a remarkably absurd term when applied to a particular section of a community where ninety-nine out of a hundred work for their living with either head, or hands, or feet —are doubtless irritated excessively to find that after all their agitation, for the present things are to remain just as they were; and that in case of an increase of the number of the Celestials, they are still to be admitted to the vast privileges of being New Zealanders on payment of a moderate sum, which sum itself is to be handed back to them when they leave the colony, provided they can show a clean bill of moral health. The Bill provides that when the present number of Chinese presidents here (4,600) shall have increased to 5,000,. a poll-tax of £lO per head shall be levied on every new arrival from-China, and shall be deraanded of the captain of every ship before he is allowed to land his passengers. When leaving the colony, this sum is to be refunded on the Chinaman showing that he has not been convicted of any offence against the law, or .been a burden on the fluids of { any public charitable institution.

There is little • to find fault with in this provisional settlement of the' question. To talk of the Chinese at-present in the colony, and numbering only 4,600, as an actual danger, in the military sense of the term danger, is nonsense. If some 480,000 Europeans cannot keep 4,600 Chinamen in Order they certainly deserve themselvesf to be kicked out of N6* Zealand'in a most summary manner. In India we manage with *50,000 trdbps to keep an empire containing,;,it is . said, two hundred millions of people, speaking different languages, believing in different religions; and maintaining widely different' customs from ohr own, in such profound peace, that, accordingto Mr Prinsep, the artist, it is as safe to be walking about unarmed and unattended in the north west'provinces of Hindojstan ps in the country’lanes of England. Such being the case, “the workingman” or loafing man either, ought to be able still to smoke his pipe in placid serenity notwithstanding the presence of the yellow agony in our colony. In many respects indeed the presence of the Chinese among us is a positive advantage. f Wehave been talking lately about introducing novel industries into New Zealaud, and have particularised tea cultivation;' and silk production as among them. Now it is beyond all question that if we get the right kind of Chinamen here they can teach us a good deal more about these subjects than we can teach them. It is true that most of the Chinamen resident, here and in Australia do not belong to this class, and in their occupation and social status resemble rather the ’longshore men of Wapping and Rotherhithe, and some indeed are mere loafers and gamblers, who do not hesitate to hand in the name, of their occupation to the County Council valuators as that of “ gambler.” Still, there is already resident in the Australasian colonies a fair number of most useful and respectable Chinamen, who cultivate gardens and produce excellent vegetables, where the Europeans in the neighborhood somehow fail altogether to do anything of the kind. Now it is highly probable thas if enquiry were made it would be found that many of these cultivators of the “ cabbagee ” or “ callot ” would be quite as successful with the customary products of their own country. We are quite open to admit that, in some respects, the Chinamen are not, desirable immigrants. The charges: against them of being dirty, gambling, immoral, and specially liable to contagious and infectious diseases seem definitely proved. ' They -< are also objectionable on .the ground of their not bringing their wives and. families with them, and thus practically giving hostages for. their gooff behaviour. Still, we have had no proof hitherto Of the Chinamen - among <us constituting a great hd&ancOt ( fa* Jess a great’

danger. When their numbers are such as to make them either one or the other, it is most probable we shall know as well what to do with them in New Zealand as our fellow countrymen have in Singapore and in Hong Kong.

Postal. —Supplementary mails forth® United Kingdom, via Brindisi, will be despatched per express train to connect with the Arawata, at the Bluff, and will close at 10 o’clock on Wednesday morning. Late fee letters may bo posted in the mail van as usual.

Masonic. —The. meeting of the Royal Arch Chapter takes place this evening, at the Masonic Hall, Tancred street.

A Correction. —We find that the statement we published last week that the outfall drain in this town was completed, was erroneous. It is not likely to be completed for about a week . yet.

■ Ministry op Public Works.— The Wellington correspondent of the Christchurch Press telegraphs that the latest rumor with regard to the vacant portfolio is that Mr Oliver will be reinstated. There is no truth in the rumor that has been circulated that he is willing to resume his former position in the Government.

Unlicensed Distillation. —We learn from the Telegraph that something more than a vague suspicion exists that there is at present in existence a private still not far from Christchurch in full working order, and the manner in which the proprietors dispose of their manufactures is said to be very elaborate. A Titled Medical Man. The Emperor of Germany, on his 70th birthday, told his physician he. would make him a count if he brought him to his 80th. He kept his promise, and now E remises to make him . a prince if .he rings him to his 90th birthday.

Billiard Saloon,— Mr A. Farquahar has leased the billiard saloon at Butler’s Hotel, and in an advertisement appearing in another column, solicits a visit at the hands of the public. We understand it is liis intention to institute great improvements in the room, and this done, we have no doubt he will have nothing to complain of regarding patronage received at the public’s hands. Consultation. —Mr J. L. Fleming’s Novelty Consultation, No. 3, on the Oamaru Steeplechases, was drawn at. Messrs W. Clifford and Co.’s auction rooms, Cashel street, on the 10th inst., in the presence of a large number of subscribers. The prizes were won by persons in different parts of the colony—the first in the Handicap was won by a working man in town, the second by a city butcher, and the third; by a lady in Master ton ; the first in the Maiden by a city shoemaker, the second by a surveyor at Rakaia, and the third by a farm servant at Leeston. The prospectus of of No. 4 Consultation on the Randwick Spring Meeting will be found in bnr advertising columns.

’ St. Stephen’s Vestry Meeting.—A special vestry meeting was held at the parsonage last evening, at which the Rev. W. 0. Harris, Acting-Archdeacon for Akaroa, attdhded to ask the usual .questions with regard to church matters; the rev. gentleman expressing his entire satisfaction on the result of his enquiries. A long discussion took place on a proposal to make the township and suburbs a separate pariah ; and after Mr Harris’ opinion had been asked, it was decided to call a meeting of parishioners at an eArly date, to consider the matter. The proceedings then terminated.; (j _ [ !; ! Football.— The Ashburton Football Club will practice as usual pa the Domain ground to-morrow. ‘ It is desirable that as many members as possible should put in an appearance, in order that there should be proper scope for making a good selection, of a team for the matches. yet. to bbme off this -amaob.' A meeting {will be held this jrbek to cdbsider the challenges received.'

Christchurch Cathedral. —The Press informs us that rapid progress is being made with the work yet remaining to be completed before, the Cathedral can be consecrated. ’ The glass has been placed in all the clerestory Windows, and the large rose window is now receiving the glazier’s attention. The north porch is also fast approaching completion, and, as far as can been {foreseen, the building will be ready to be opened on the 10th of August.

Flbminoton ScHdoi. —Mr OapeWiiliamson opened the iabove school yesterday morning, with an attendance of 40 scholars.

Ashburton Presbyterian Church.— A special meeting of the Managing Committee of the Ashburton Presbyterian Church was held in the vestry last night. With the exception of two, all the. members of the Committee, which this year is an exceedingly numerous one, were present, the vestry being quite full. / The chief business to be transacted was the election of a choirmaster,' ’ The Rev. Mr Beattie, who Iras Chairman; and also convener of a subcommittee that had been appointed to 'take 1 the opinion of the choir members bn the subject of a chief, reported verbally, and after the report had been received, Mr McLaren, ' the Secretary of the Church, proposed Mr Alex Craighead for the office, speaking very highly of his abilities as a musician and ofthe special qualities he possessed for successfully filling the position. . His appointment, he said, would be calculated to Increase the numerical and musical strength of the Choir, which had fallen off within the last few months ; , and there could be little doubt that under Mr Craighead’s care the choir would speedily-rise to a. very high position. Mr G. M. Robinson seconded the motion, paying also a high tribute to Mr Craighead. After some discussion, in the coqrsc of .which the gratuitous services of Mr A. Stott, as organist, were spoken of in terms of warm appreciation, it was resolved unanimously to recommend Mr Craighead’s appointment to the Kirk Session. From the very harmonious feeling that obtained at the meeting, and from Mr Craighead’s known '.popularity in the Church, it is calculated that his appointment as choirmaster will be a happy une, and that under his guidance the choir will reach a high degree of excellence. After someminor financial work, the meeting proceeded tb consider the celebration of the Church anniversary, and the first Sabbath In September was fixed for the 1 anniversary services, the annual tea meeting co be held in the following week, the exact date being left to the ladies to fix.

Talk too TAlf "Sense.— Mr Downie Stewart (remarks -the Dunedin Star), in his recent address to his constituents, made some remarkable observations in regard to the Property Tax. He considers that it is detrimental to the industrial pursuits of the colony . taxes the springs orindustry, the reason he alleges, being that “ machinery is Cm the capital value, ' whether employed in' reproductive works or nof." ' He arguef therefrom that the fehaency ‘of the tax is “to prevent persons from investing their money unless they ate absolutely certain of making a profitable investment which would enable, them to pay .the tax! ” This is “very well for " mgh ” ; htrt, considering the amount ofthe tax—one penny in the £— it is rather 'difficult to conceive that an enterprise requiring the application of machinery would be nipped in the bud by the knowledge that the sum of Lf 3s 4d would have to be paid' annually on every L 1,000.50 invested; ! 1 • *

Farming in Tjs Whiti’s District. — News from the Parihaka Block from some of the first settlers on that land is to the effect that the earlier sown grasses are up, and looking really well and strong. They are waging a war against the wild pigs. They have to submit to much delay and inconvenience in respect to the delivery of goods ordered, which, in addition to being a long time on the road, run a great risk of being miscarried. The Maoris are considered to be unable to resist the temptation of stealing little things left unguarded.

Albury Railway Extension. —Yesterday’s Timaru Herald tells us:—His Worship the Mayor received the following telegram from Mr Turnbull, M.H.R., Wellington, in reference to the unemployed : The Government will at once call for tenders for formation on the Fairlie Greek railway line in small sections.”

The Albertown Outrage. B. Bushnell, the youth committed for trial on Thursday for attempted rape on Mrs Mary Cameron, near Albertown, was forwarded (says the Cromwell Argus) by Friday’s coach to Dunedin to await his trial. Bushnell is only twenty years of age, a native of Dover, of French parentage, and has nothing criminal in his appearance. He has for some time been; in the employ of Mr W. Grant, of Mount Barker, as ploughman. Drink seems to have been the agency that brought Bushnell into his present .position, of which he seems ashamed by his demeanor in the dock. The evidence showed that Mrs Cameron had been much knocked about, and there can be no doubt that but for the prompt action of Mr Hardie, a neighbor, the prisoner would have rendered him himself, liable to punishment for a capital offence. Prisoner tried to work on the woman’s fears by representing himself as a bushranger. That his action was premeditated is clear from the fact that Mrs Cameron’s .house is a full quarter of a mile from any other dwelling, and somewhat difficult to reach. Mrs Cameron acted with great presence of mind when it is borne in mind that, with nine young children, she was attacked in such an out-of-the-way locality. One of Mrs Cameron’s girls, aged ten years, appears to have acted with much courajge, attacking the prisoner with a mamika stick. The prisoner wanted to plead guilty to the two charges preferred against him.

Cost op Wae. —War is the most expensive of national luxuries. A French economist estimates the cost of the Franco-Prussian war at L 580,000,000 for a year’s fighting. A First-rate State Speculation. —The Suez Canal shares bought by the Beaoonsfield Government at 20 in 1876 are now worth 78, a profit of over fifty millions.

Severe, ip not Spiteful. — A critic in the Australasian, in reviewing Ouida’s last novel, “ A Village Commune,’’ says that “ Sometimes it is delirious, and sometimes it is stupid, and sometimes it is both at once; and at all times it is dull. Readers of this gifted author’s former works do not require to be reminded that When she is dull her dullness is most portentous. And her power of dullness was never exhibited in greater force than in “A Village Commune.” V

The Wesleyan Mission in the Friendly Islands. —The South Australian Advertiser states that the Wesleyan Church in the Friendly Islands is threatened with a serious secession. For' a considerable time there was a misunderstanding between the Rev. S. W. Baker and the Missionary Committee, in consequence,' of the Rev. Mr Baker’s too close association of himself with the political and commercial interests ■of Tonga. This misunderstanding: i diflminated some months ago, and Mr Baker resigned his position as a Wesleyan missionary, and became Prime minister: to King George in Tonga. Another missionary, the Rev. J. B. Watkin, had beenso intimately connected with Mr Baker tlixtit was deemed necessary by the committee to recall him. The whole case was fully discussed in the General Conference which has just closed. . Tonga was constituted 1 an independent district, and a friendly letter forwarded {to the' {king. Since the close of the conference,-- -a telegram has, we are informed, been received from Mr Baker, in which he describes the king and bis chiefs as being enraged on account of the recall of the Rev. Mr Watkin, ahd states their determination to secede from; the Wesloyans and establish a national church, unless Mr Watkin is reinstated and the church in Tonga withdrawn from the control of the. New South Wales and Queensland Conference, and attached to that of -New Zealand. The,Conference being closed, the reply forwarded was necessarily of a formal character!, and; the friends of the , Wesleyan Mission in Tonga will watch with anxiety the progress pf events. Tasmania Looking {Dp.— The little colony of'Tasmania, an exchange;tells us, is looking; up wonderfully. After a period of unparalleled depression, during which most of the young men emigrated to other colonies, leaving few besides old men and women behind, a tide of prosperity has apt in, in consequence of the extraordinary mineral discoveries. The quartz reefs, especially at Brandy Creek, now called Beaoonsfield, on the Tamar, are yielding, enormous returns. The Great Tasmania has paid L 123,000 in dividends, out of a claim which cost the company, which consists of only ‘half-a-dozen L 5,000. It is less than three years ago, that a Launceston merchant invested his all in a claim in. this place. Fora while it was an anxious time with him. ■ . If the mine did not yield well it meant ruin. He is now receiving dividends at the rate of about L 50,000 a year, with every prospect of such good fortune continuing. When we say that he is a liberal, generous man •cill, it will rather surprise those who know the usual run of colonial wealthy men.

Japan Wis/e than Vioxoeia on the Fee* Tbads Question. —The Japanese are an exceedingly intelligent people, and evidently comprehend and appreciate the doctrines of political economy. Ip a late number of the Japan Weekly Mail, published in Yokahama, there are translations of articles from two Japanese papers, which indicate sound views regarding Protection and the theory of equitable balances. One of these articles is devoted to the “error of wishing to check imports. ” The writer observes that “money is in its nature goods, j ust the same as other merchandise,” and he adds, “ Supposing that 1,000,000 of our gold coins have been exported abroad it will easily be seen that there must be something that has been imported to our country in return.” This philosophy pf unrestricted commerce is expounded ih the observation “ By supplying the wants of cold countries with such things as are abundant in temperate climes, and by conveying the superfluous productions of-the torrid zone to the frigid zone mutual assistance and convenience can be ensured.” These opinions from an Oriental, source contrast rather favorably with the ; views still in favor with Victorian Liberals., ,

A brewer having been drowned in one of his own vats, ,a wit, on hearing of it, exclaimed, “ Alas! poor fellow, floatihg on his own watery bier !” Carving isn’t fun. A young man was invited to carve a turkey, at dinner recently, and before the knife was filially taken from him he had upset a glass of water, wrenched his shoulder, shot the bird across the nable into a lady’s lap,, and nearly j«tfsed'*a man’s eye out ; and it wasn’t a tough bird either. <

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas, et Prevalbeit. TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 1881. Chinese Immigration., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 375, 21 June 1881

Word Count
3,199

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas, et Prevalbeit. TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 1881. Chinese Immigration. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 375, 21 June 1881

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