Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Ashburton Guardian. Manga Est Veritas et Prevalebit MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1881. The Hospitals and Charitable Institutions Bill.

TOWN EDITION. \lssued at 4.10 p.m.'J

Seldom has a more foolish Bill been brought into the New Zealand Parliament, and passed with less consideration than the Hospitals and Charitable Institutions Bill, the second reading of which was carried last week. The subject itself is one of the deepest moment, for it is no other than that of the introduction of a Poor Law into a colony naturally the wealthiest in the world. For more than fifty years past, to say nothing of what took place at more remote periods of British history, this subject has been pondered over by, and has baffled the ablest statesmen of Great Britain, and all have asserted that if it were possible, at almost any cost, to get rid of the dire necessity of a Poor Law it should be done. Yet notwithstanding this fact, which, should be well known to all well informed politicians, our present Ministry, by no means the most brilliant that has ever governed an Australasian colony, has thought fit to take a complete departure from the course of British statesmanship, and, “.Like little wanton boys that swim on.bladders, And venture far beyond their depth,”

in attempting to be original, have only succeeded in being absurd and mis- , chievous. We are well aware that i under the new clauses introduced at the eleventh hour, existing charitable institutions are still kindly allqwed to exist if their promoters try hard to preserve their existence, but that is all. The thin , end of the wedge has been introduced, and with tolerable certainty it may be predicted that k -will be driven home before long. The principle of superseding private charity by State taxation has been recognised, and all the evils of State pauperism will come in due time. “ The quality of mercy” is to be “strained,” and instead of dropping." like the gentle dew from Heaven,” is to be henceforth dropped from the gentle hands of Mr Bumble, the beadle, and Mrs Corney, the workhouse matron. What makes the Ministerial blunder all the worse, is, that there was ho public demand for any alteration of the existing system of relief by private charity; supplemented indeed by Government aid, .but administered by the hands of those who had given proof of their charitable interest in the poor by subscriptions for their relief. Numerous coihplaints have been made against officials in charge of Government institutions of a somewhat similar character generally, such as lunatic asylumns, &c.; but where has there been any wide-spread indignation expressed regarding the management of our hospitals and benevolent asylums ? Often the very best of our local public men have been those selected to take charge of our local charitable institutions ; the noblest sympathies of our common humanity have been called forth in the duties involved in such care, and the work has. all been done on the whole with as little cost as practicable. Under such circumstances, wise men generally think it most prudent to let well alone. It is strange that the Oppokition in Parliament, often captious in the highest degree, with regard to imaginary grievances and defaults on the .part of the Ministry of the day, should have been so far obtuse as scarcely to have perceived this at all. Sir George Grey, the ostensible leader of the party, completely neglected a grand opportunity for discharging a statesmanlike duty and wandered completely away from the question of the relieving of poverty and sickness, in order to indulge in some bombastic rhodomontade on the evils of compulsory poverty, and the absence of any necessity for its existence. All this was quite wide of the mark. When was there ever a time, we should like to know, in any civilised country where there was no poverty or sickness? A high authority told us long ago that “ the poor we shall always have with us.” And history, to any man who has read so as to know what was going on behind the gaudy scenery of court intrigues and bloody battle-fields, has always confirmed the statement that wherever we see wealth we must see poverty also, wherever great wealth extreme poverty. The best methods of relieving its pressure are what politicans have to consider, arid to no class of subjects more than to this does Macaulay's assertion apply with greater ' force, that whatever can be done by ) private persons is sure to be better . done than by the Government of a ■ country. . • 1

Dying and Cleaning. —As will bo seen by advertisement appearing in another column, Mr George King, dyer and cleaner, has opened an agency in this district, at Mr Clarice’s, hairdresser and tobacconist, East street, where orders can bo left and will receive prompt attention. This industry is rapidly growing in favor in Christchurch and other northern towns, so much so indeed that Mr King, although only established some few months, has found it incumbent on him to make arrangements for an increase of his business promises, now being executed. Mr King’s prices are astonishingly moderate, and his work—specimens of which were shown to us dining a recent visit to the factory—is turned out in A 1 stylo ; indeed we may mention that wo were shown fabrics which had been dyed and cleaned which defied detection, except at the hands of an expert, when compared with the new materials. Mr T. Collins has been appointed the Timarn agent. A Blind Orchestra. —Fourteen pupil 3 of the Blind Institute of Milan are about

to make a visit to London, at the expense of Mr Richardson Gardner. They are all musicians, and will form an orchestra, to be led by a blind man.

The Married Woman’s Property Protection Bill. —The Press correspondent telegraphs the following' synopsis of this Bill, introduced in the Legislative Council by the Hon. Mr Waterhouse:— The Bill proceeds on different lines from the Act passed last session ; that provided mainly for the case of women who are deserted or cruelly treated by their husbands, or whose husbands are either openly unfaithful or habi tual drunkards. The now Bill further provides that a married woman may acquire, hold and dispose of property without the intervention of a trustee ; may sue and be sued and be subject to the bankruptcy laws if she carry on a separate trade. A woman married after the passing of the Act may hold as her separate property any owned by her at the time of her marriage or subsequently acquired, and women'married before the Act may hold property acquired after the passing of the Act. A husband is not to be liable for his wife’s debts contracted before marriage, except to the extent of the property acquired throughher. Disputes between husband and wife as to property may bo summarily settled by a Judge of the Supreme Court. Nothing in the Act is to affect existing matrimonial -settlements or the power of making future settlements. The Auckland Arson Gash —James and William Bindon have been committed for trial on a charge of araoli, and bail was refused.

Brigandage Near Ashburton. —In the stereotyped language of the paragraphist, information was received in town to-day of a case of sticking up at Tinwald this morning. The particulars to hand are that a local Boniface who was this morning united in the bands of matrimony whilst proceeding to Winslow, at which place it was his intention to catch tho southern express, was “stuck up” in a most unique manner. Tho leviers of black mail were evidently apprised of the movements of tho wedding party, and had placed across the road a number of beer barrels, over which was a carpet, the “ gang ” being posted on tho top, of this impromptu, staging, and yelling their well wishes at high pressure rate. The victim came up at express speed, but seeing no moans of exit was forced to pull up and fork out, after which lie was allowed to resume his journey, tho “ band ” adjourning to their haunt—tho local hostelry.

New Zealand Cement.— lt is now understood that Mr A. Brogden, M'P., who is now in Wellington, intends testing the practicability of establishing the manufacture of cement in New Zealand. He has obtained from Taranaki a number of Flocks of limestone, some clay, and other materials apparently suitable for cement manufacture, which he purposes sending Home in order to have the materials made into cement, with a view of testing the matter thoroughly. A Happy Device. — A venerable incumbent in the 'diocese of Canterbury, says tho Timaru Herald, having reason _ to complain of the smallnessof the offertories, determined on an attempt to remedy tho evil. One Sunday morning, a few weeks ago, on receiving the bags,, from the churchwardens, he emptied their contents into the basin, and noticing there was tho usual scarcity of the coin of the realm, exclaimed/' Not enough, not enough ! Go round again,” which the officials did, and with very satisfactory results.

New Businesses. Our advertising columns to-day notify further illustrations of the progress of Ashburton and the surrounding distret. It will be seen that Messrs P. and D; Duncan are about to open a branch of their business on that section adjoining the Post-office, Ashburton, for repairing all kinds of agricultural implements, and furnishing ploughs, drays, etc. The management will be in the hands of Mr J. Keir.

Great Exhibition at Rome.— There will be a World’s Fair at Rome in 1835-86, under tho honorary presidency of tho Prince Amadeus. This is definitely decided upon. The .exposition at Moscow has been postponed till 1882.

Additions to the Tinwald Hotel. — We understand that it is the intention of Mr M. Scott, at an early date, to make extensive additions to this hotel. Included in these will be the erection of a billiard-room..

The Value op our Colonies. —ln these days when men who complacently consider themselves philosophical statesmen talk and write glibly and dogmatically about getting rid of our colonies, the following information taken from tho Board of Trade returns may be of interest, as showing that whilst there is a remarkable and steady decrease in our exports to some foreign countries there is an equally remarkable and steady increase in our exports to many of our colonies. During the last twelve years our exports to Germany have declined as much as 33£ per cent., to Holland 30 por cent., and to the United States to 28 per cent. Our exports to Franco have increased in the twelve years 20£ per cent., but it is entirely in coals and machinery; a very doubeful advantage, as we cannot replace tho coal, and much of tho machinery will be used to assist France in competing with us in tho markets of the world. Onr exports to Russia for the three years 1878-80 show an increase of 19 per cent, over tho previous three years, but it is entirely in machinery. On the other hand onr exports to Canada have increased Soper cent., to India and Ceylon and tho Straits Settlements 29 por cent., and to the Australian colonies 541- par cent.

Eccentric Christian Names. —A rich and eccentric old Kentuckian named Lewis Hamilton, who was killed by a fall from his horse recently, is said to have left five children bearing the surprising names of Avenue Belle, a young girl of 18 ; China Figure, another daughter, of 14; London Judge, a son, aged 21 ; Hebrew Fashion, a daughter, aged 11, and Southern Soil, a lad of eight years. Near the Grave.— An odd incident is reported from the Transvaal. A private of the. 97th, who had poisoned himself with native grog, a villainous sort of brandy, was brought in as dead, and an inquest was held upon him. He was found to have died by over-drinking bad alcholic liquor, and in the course of the morning was taken away for burial;’ While being borne to the’grave the shaking up in the coffin awoke him, arid he shouted lustily to be let out, causing a general scare among the men carrying him. The man was released, arid is still alive, and hia narrow escape will doubtless make hini more cautious as to the quality of his liquor; ip fusurp. ; y

New Store at Tinwald. —As evincing the rapid growth of the little town

“ across the water,’ - we have it that a new general store was opened there on Saturday night by Messrs Biggs and Raid. The business premises obtained by the now firm are the store and offices recently occupio I by Messrs Jones and Bradshaw. The show on Saturday was an imposing one, and we understand the patronage received was even beyond expectations, by an advertisement which appears in this issue, it will be seen that specially cheap lines are placed in the market by Messrs Biggs and Reid. The investors in this speculation have our heartiest wishes for the success thereof.

Presentation. —Mr Mills, warehousekeeper, of H.M. Customs, at Auckland, who has been appointed head clerk at the Christchurch department, was presented on his departure by Ins fellow officers with a handsome clock. Artistic Oaligrapiiv. —Wo have received from Mr J. M. Meek, who is nowstaying for a time in Ashburton, a copy of a new design which he has executed in pen and ink, and which is styled “The Christian’s Keepsake.” It is a woll-oxecuted design of two tree-, on the trunks and branches of which are inscribed numerous texts of Scripture, illustrative of Christian principles and maxims. In the centra is the figure of the Saviour, with the motto, “ And thou shalt call his name Jesus. ’ Mr Meek lias been known for many years in the Australasian colonies for the excellence of his design and workmanship in similar works of art. The cost ob this latest effort of his talent is, wo understand, ss. The Sculling Championship. —The race between Albert White, of Auckland, and W. Hearn, of Wellington, for L2OO and the sculling championship of the ' colony, is now definitely fixed for the 9th proximo, Mr E. 0. Batkin having received a telegram from Mr Thomas Henderson, of Auckland, statu-g that, with one slight exception, White had agreed to Hearn’s alterations in the terms of the agreement. We {New Zealand Times) understand that the match will come off at three o’clock in the afternoon, and besides the principal event, there will be a four-oared race between the town and Civil Service, and a handicap scullers’ race, open to all comers.

The Comet. —Mr Todd, C.M.G., in a letter to the Adelaide papers about the comet says:—“ From observations I have made, I think it most probable that it is a return visit of the fine comet of 1861, and is possibly identical with the comet No. 2 of 1819, discovered by Professor Traills, of Berlin.”

Suicide. —Frank Cotteroll, who. was a barman at the Dunedin Industrial Exhibition, committed suicide on Saturday night about midnight by jumping off the wharf, He had been discharged that night, arid, having a wife at home confined to bod, became low spirited. He left bis pocketbook on the wharf, giving dtis name and address, and also left his upper clothing. The body was found yesterday.

A Postal Union. —A circular was despatched on May 19, signed by Mr Langridge, Postmaster-General of Victoria, to the Governments of the adjacent colonies, in reference to the desirability of Australia joining in a universal postal union- He shows that it would not be to the interest of Victoria to enter a postal union unless on a distinct understanding with the other colonies that they would give a general support to tho fortnightly Gallo service, which is maintained exclusively for postal purposes.

Presbyterian. —A meeting of the Finance Committee of tho Presbyterian Church takes place this evening, at 7.30, when, we are informed, important business will he brought before the meeting.

The British Revenue. —The increase in the British revenue returns for j the year ending March 31 is L 2,750,000. Mahquis, ob Cat’s . Meat Man. —The late Lord Lansdowne used to ' relate that when, after Turner the painter’s death, he went to the artist’s house on a foggy morning, in the hope of getting a peep of his reserved works, the old woman in charge, looking up through the area railings,,took him for the cat’s-meat man, and bawling up, told him he “needn’t come again, as the cat had died the day before. ”

New Suburban Municipality. 4- A public meeting of the ratepayers, resident in the southern portion of the North Avon Road district was held on Saturday evening at the schoolroom, St Albans, Christchurch, for the purpose of deciding on the name to be given to the proposed new municipality to the north‘of Christchurch. Mr J. L. Wilson, Chairman of the Avon Road Board, was in the chair. It was stated that the proposed Borough contained 1,050 houses, and that the assessment would amount to about L 2,000 in another year. The names of St Albans, Papanui, Springfield, and North Avon, were respectively proposed for the new municipality, and that of St Albans was declared to bo adopted by a large majority.

Auction Sales.—lt will bo seen from notices in our advertising columns that Mr T. Bullook will offer for sale by auction at his rooms, East street, the following goods and land On Saturday next, 25th iust., new furniture, comprising double bedsteads, colonial couch, pianoforte by Delaraere and Co., double-furrpw ploughs, Ac.; on Saturday, 9th July," a farm of 200 acres, situated near the Wakamii homestead, 96 acres in tho Lougbeaoh district, about two miles from the Ashton school, 41a 3r 28p about limiles from Ashburton, and five valuable building sites on Mayo’s block.

A Warm Seat. — One lias heard of a drunken man attempting to light his pipe at a pump. Here is a contrast. On April 3rd, Robert Bradshaw, cotton operative, went home late at night drunk, and sat down on the top bar of the kitchen fireplace. His wife was awakened by his screams, and coming down, found him enveloped in flames. He was dreadfully burned, and was removed to the Oldham Infirmary, where ho died from his injuries.

A doctor, passing a marble-yard, called out, “ Good morning, MrD hard at work ? I see yon finish your gravestones as far as ‘ In the memory of,’ and then wait, I suppose, to see who wants a monument next V’ “ Why, yes,” replied the old man ; “ unless somebody’s ill and you are doctoring him ; then I keep straight on. ”

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810620.2.9

Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Manga Est Veritas et Prevalebit MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1881. The Hospitals and Charitable Institutions Bill., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 374, 20 June 1881

Word Count
3,097

The Ashburton Guardian. Manga Est Veritas et Prevalebit MONDAY, JUNE 20, 1881. The Hospitals and Charitable Institutions Bill. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 374, 20 June 1881

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working