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The Ashburton Guardian. Manga Est Veritas et Prevalebit. SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1881. Canterbury College.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 410 p.m. ’J

The Christchurch institutions for the promotion of the more advanced education of young people of both sexes —the High Schools for boys and girls and the two Colleges—do credit alike to the public spirit and the intelligence of die district The High Schools are admitted by the most competent judges at all parts of the colony to be at least as good as any, if not the best, in New Zealand. A similar praise is due in the main to the Canterbury College. Not merely can it boast of having contributed more holders of scholarships in the New Zealand University than any other institution in the colony, but it is said that the training is as severe as at the best of the Universities in the Home country—at London, Cambridge, or Oxford. No question whatever has yet been raised as to the competence and energy of every one of . the professors. The grand drawback to its great excellence is the system of “ cramming” which has been introduced, and in some departments of study—more especially in English and in political economy —has lately become more completely established than ever. It is well known to those who are at all initiated into the mysteries of Canterbury College life that there is at present a very wide difference among the professors themselves as to the utility of the existing system, and that among the students, even among the brightest and most industrious, the opinion is almost universal that the work required is more than can possibly be gone through properly. Solid works on political economy by the great masters of the science, containing some four hundred or five hundred pages octavo, are given out to students, who have had next to no previous knowledge of the subject, to be mastered thoroughly in a week, or even less time, and this too iis-dhly a small fraction of the study is required at the time to be spent on a variety of other subjects. With such an immense quantity of intellectual pabulum to be swallowed, mental indigestion is the necessary consequence. Let them work as hard as they may from daylight to past midnight every day, there is not the ghost of a chance of grappling with all the study required. The body soon becomes over-tasked, and, though unconsciously to the student, the brightness and quickness of the mind are steadily and surely impaired. The warnings of Professor Tewsley and other eminent masters of physiology as to the danger of thus over-tasking the intellectual powers, and leaving no proper time for rest and recreation, are quite unheeded, and though .an education of the mind, excellent in many respects, is ■ imparted, it is at the expense of the proper development of the body at the very time when it is most needed, namely the time of approaching manhood and womanhood. In a lecture lately delivered by one of the College professors, and published, along with much that is excellent about the need of strenuous effort to accomplish anything great intellectually, there is all along underlying and sometimes explicitly avowed, the fallacious doctrine that the only recreation required for the student is the change from one kind of study to another of a different description. To show the error of such a notion it is only necessary to furnish the reduetto ad absurdurn proof that no man, even the most energetic College professor, could remain in good health if he were to attempt to dispense with his four, five, six or seven hours sleep per diem, no matter how widely or how often he changed the scope of his studies, even if he passed on from Plato’s Republic or the Prometheus Bound, to Conic Sections, and from these to Hallam’s Constitution History, Kant’s “ Critic of Pure Reason,” or Mill on “ The Limits of the Conditioned.”

We believe fully that an excellent education is being imparted at Canterbury College, but in common with Professor Bickerton, who delivered the opening lecture at the commencement of the present term, and whose lecture has been published lately, we doubt if the physical sciences receive due attention, and if mere formal knowledge, such as philology and literary criticism, does not receive so much. It is very certain at least that physiology, the science of the law regarding health, is both theoretically and practically left out in the cold. Were it more studied the conviction could not fail soon to force itself on the minds of both students and professors that mind and body are so closely interwoven in their powers and destinies that one cannot be neglected without injury to the other. Our working men have achieved a great social victory for themselves in getting their hours of labor limited to eight per diem. If College students employ a similar proportion of their time daily to the energetic prosecution of their studies, it is very certain that in the long run they will accomplish more than if they continue to make the vain attempt to devote sixteen to a more exhaustive labor than that of only the hands and feet.

Clean Charge Sheet. —There was no business at the R.M. Court this morning.

Notice to Creditors. —lt is requested that all claims against the late Mr Stalker be sent in at once.

Sale of Wreckage. —The wreckage of the brig Pakeha was sold to-day by Messrs H. Matson and Co. for Llls 13s.

Missing. —o. Clark, a cadet in the Telegraph Office at Russell, disappeared suddenly last evening ; he is supposed to have cleared out by some vessel.

Stealing Bread. A man named Sydney H. Smith was sentenced to a week’s imprisonment at Christchurch, yesterday, for stealing a loaf of bread.

Bazaar.- —A Bazaar in aid of the Barrhill Church was held on Wednesday last, in the schoolroom, Barrhill. The nett results amounted to some LBO. Notice to Burgesses. —An item interesting tq those burgesses who have not yet liquidated the amount of their rates appears in our advertising columns today. Waterloo Cup. —Mr Stapleton’s Canary Consultation, No. 9, has filled up well, and will be drawn on Wednesday night next, at the Foresters’ Hall, Christchurch, at 7-30. There are about sixtyfour prizes to be drawn for. Civil Cases. Yesterday, after our reporter left the Court, judgment was given in the case of Smith v. Tisch for the sum of Ll 4 16s lOd and costs, in favor of the plaintiff. Railway Returns. —The returns for April in this direction show a total of receipts of L 17,940 9s for the North Island, and L 72,110 13s for the Middle Island, grand total L 90,051 2s ; with a total per centage of 44.29. The Grey Valley Election. The following is the complete return of the votes polled in this election —Weston, 995 ; Fitzgerald, 919 ; Morris, 79. The utmost good feeling characterised the election throughout. An Easy Death. —An old lady, Mrs Donnelly, living alone at her residence at Howick, near Auckland, was found dead therein. From appearances, she fell dead while in the act of taking hsr tea.

Collision in Auckland Harbor. —A noon yesterday, the North Shore Ferry Company’s steamer Takapuna ran into a cargo boat and sank her. The master, Patrick Green, clung to the steamer’s paddle-box till rescued. Haglet Park. —lt is intended to apply to the Government this session for power to fence in that portion of Hagley Park, in Christchurch, in which the sports ground is situated, in order that the public shall bo charged admission on six days during the year. Personal. —Sergeant Felton, who has been for several days confined to his bed with a severe attack of congestion of the lungs, is, we are pleased to hear, fast recovering, and will shortly be able to again resume his duties. Drag Hunt. —It having been found inpossible to establish a Hunt Club in this district during the present season, arrangements have been made for a visit from the Otago hounds. The pack will arrive here on the ‘ 27th ipst., returning the following Friday, and will be under charge of Mr S. Saunders.

Appointments. —We learn that Mr E. J. Collins, of South Otaia, has been appointed to the mastership of the Rowlands School, rendered vacant by the resignation of Mr H. Cape-Williamson, the latter gentleman taking charge of the newly-opened school at Flemington. Regina v. Murphy, The Appeal Court having held that there was a manifest error of judgment in regard to two of the counts in this case, Judge Johnston has intimated his intention to sentence Murphy to a similar term on the remaining counts in the indictment which still remain good.

Undesirable Visitors.— lt is stated that there is at present in Dunedin a ruffianly gang of burglars and robbers, and the depredations of late have led to extra precautions on the part of the police. The various branches of the banks, &c., have been warned in case of attempts being made to rob them. One of the clocks from the Supreme Courthouse, Dunedin, has been stolen.

The Electric Light in Mines. —The attention of the British Royal Commission on mines is now directed to a series of experiments as to the explosive nature of poal dust, as to the best kind of safetylamp, and as to other matters designed to elucidate the causes of explosions. It is proposed that some experiments shall take place to test the efficacy of the electric light as an illuminating power in mines.

Accident at Waimate. A serious accident happened to Mr W. Manchester, at Waimate, last week, whilst working at a chaff-cutting machine. It appears he was feeding the machine, and, putting his hands too far between the feeding rollers, his right hand was dragged between them and cut off by the revolving knives. He was immediately taken toTthe Hospital, where two doctors rendered surgical aid. Tall Talk. —We, in our “ tight little island,” are (writes Public Opinion), after all, only pigmies compared with our offspring, if the United States, in their largeness, will still permit themselves to be included among them. Our production of iron and coal is known to be enormous, but what are they compared with those of the America of the future ? Speaking of the coal deposits of the Missouri, a contemporary says that there are 26,887 square miles of such deposits in that State, and a “ calculating machine” has demonstrated they, can supply '100,000,000tons a year for the next 1,300 years, and still leave a handsome margin for future generations. ; There is also an iron mountain in the State 228 ft. high, whose base covers 500 acres ; and it is computed that the quantity of ore above the surface is 230,187,375 tons. Adjacent to the mountain is a “knoll,” 581 ft. high, with an acreage at the : base of 360, and the iron ores in it are estimated at 13,972,773 tons. It is all very well to overwhelm general readers with such stupendous figures ; but we, on our part, may perhaps bo allowed to “ calculate ” that the above statements ought to be taken cum grano salis.

A Parliamentary Yarn. —The Wellington Post of Tuesday relates the following story:—“One little ‘yarn’ was told in the lobbies this morning which may be worth repeating.' An Auckland man came to an Auckland member—an ‘ independent ’ —and asked him for a ‘ trifling loan’ just a couple of pounds. After some discussion as to when it would be paid back, the ‘ borrowee ’ agreed to lend the sum asked by the borrower on condition that it should be refunded within three months. ‘ Now,’ said the lender, ‘ may I ask why you, , who, with your party, have always been making a set against me, have come to me. for money 1 Why did you not go to ‘ The Great Liberal Party, ’ whom you favor V ‘ Well,’ replied the borrower, ‘ I really don’t want your_ confounded money at all, but the fact is I went to some of the other folk just to test their ‘ liberality ’ in a practical manner, and was told they really had so many claims that they did not see their way to part with L2 just then; and ad I came to see what you would do. under the circumstances. I fiifi3 : you a ‘hard hail ’ as to terms, but then you did offer to give me the money for three months, and you’re a brick.’ The ‘Liberals’ have since lost an outside supporter and stump orator combined.* 1 ,::i v ,

Cheap Travelling. A notice to teachers, re cheap'fares on the ’railway appears in this issue. Trees.— Mr Alfred Harrison advertises a sale of trees, to take place at his rooms on Wednesday next, at 12 o’clock. A Rate.— The Upper Ashburton Road Board notify in another column the intention to strike a rate of one shilling in the pound.

Foresters’ Dinner. The annual dinner of the Court Star of Ashburton, was held last evening, at the Somerset Hotel.

The Charge Against Drake. The charge of robbery against this well-known bookmaker was dismissed, and the accused was discharged.

Sporting. —The Southland Jockey Club have decided to alter its fixture from an autumn to a spring meeting, to bo held on Thursday and Friday, Bth and 9th December next.

Amateur Dramatic Club. —A meeting of this Club was held last night, in the upper room of the Town Hall. A consideration of the accounts was for soma time under discussion, and it was resolved to give another performance at an early date.

Quite Right. —At the Licensing Court, Dunedin, yesterday, the Bench refused one or two new applications, and held over two others till they were able to make a personal inspection. One renewal was refused, as the landlord let houses to women of ill-fame.

More Libel. A publican at St. Andrews has, it is said, threatened the Waimate Times with an action for libel if that journal does not apologise for issuing a local, stating that the police report on the house was unfavorable. The Times declines.

Wedding-Ring Tax. A tax upon wedding-rings is levied in England. The duty is 17s an ounce, and the revenue derived therefrom is about L 20,000 per annum. The fashion, of wearing very thick wedding rings has greatly increased the revenue of late years, viz., from L 6,000 to L 20,000.

A Boil Over. —The barmaid of the Southland Club Hotel got a holiday yesterday, and was afterwards found to have removed her luggage to the railway station. A person to whom she owed a small sum went there and removed her trunk, which, on being opened, was found to be literally packed with effects belonging to the hotel. It has since been discovered that she was privately married two days ago.

Frozen Meat Export. —The committee appointed at the meeting of persons interested in shipping frozen meat to England held in Wellington on Wednesday met yesterday, and the following resolution was carried “ That the Government should bo asked to instruct their sheep and cattle inspectors throughout New Zealand to provide the following information : The number of fat stock in each district; the number of fat stock exported ; the probable increase that may be expected within two years from date ; the number of stock boiled down, and the local consumption.”

A Vegetarian M.H.R. —The Taranaki Herald says : —“ We hear that Mr Saunders is a Spartan as regards diet : a big loaf of brown bread, a few vegatables, and an unlimited supply of spring water, is sufficient for his limited requirements for a considerable period. Under these circumstances. it is not to be wondered at that he considers the salaries of the Civil Servants too high by one half.” Commenting on the, above a contemporary remarks :—Mr Saunders’ may be partly accounted for by the fact, that, in the language of old East Indiana, “he has a liver.” If ho indulges in good living, he must pay the penalty, and he prefers to abstain.

The Auckland Arson Case. —The Arson case against Bindon Bros, was resumed yesterday. Herbert Blaemor Gardiner deposed that on the night of the fire, at 8 o’clock, he observed the door of Bindon’s store open slowly, and a man come out quickly, look around, and go up Vulcan lane, when he disappeared. Another man came out similarly and disappeared in an opposite direction. Witness went with Detective Jeffery to Mount Eden Gaol to look at some prisoners. He saw seven in a ward, walking, and one of them looked very like ths first man he saw leaving Bindon’s premises on the night of the fire. He was not positive that Wm. Bindon was that man. The case was adjourned till to-day. An Extraordinary Duel. —A journalists’ duel, fought under unusually , severe conditions, recently occurred in Belgium. For reasons not stated, M. Rogate, principal lieutenant of M. de Cassagnac in the Pays, quarrelled with M. Tavernier, of the JSv6nement. The seconds were Vicomte de Lassus and M. Nadar, the photographer and aeronaut, for M. Tavernier, and M. Gaston Jollivet and M. Lokuessie for M. Rogat. It was decided that swords should be the weapons, and the fight be continued till one party bo disabled ; but, contrary to usage, the surgeons present were not empowered to stop the combat. They were only to offer their opinion, bat the seconds were to be the sole judges of what constituted disability. At the thirteenth round M. Tavernier received a wound, which the seconds, after consultation with the doctors, ruled was no impediment to going on. After a combat lasting, the extraordinary time of one hour and three quarters, M. Rogat received a thrust which deprived him of the use of his right arm, and the affair was declared terminated.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810618.2.8

Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Manga Est Veritas et Prevalebit. SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1881. Canterbury College., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 374, 18 June 1881

Word Count
2,970

The Ashburton Guardian. Manga Est Veritas et Prevalebit. SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1881. Canterbury College. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 374, 18 June 1881

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