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No Business. —There was no business at the R.M. Court this morning. Postal —Mails for Australia, riaßussell, close at Auckland to-morrow, the 14th inst, at 3 p.m. Trout.— During the heavy rains on Saturday last a trout, about 6 inches long, was washed up on the bank of the race running through the Domain. Sudden Death. —Mr Peter Cameron, a very old settler, residing in Lyttelton, died suddenly yesterday. He was a member of the firm of Cameron Bros,, lightermen, carrying on business in that port. Comic Opera. —To-morrow evening the Lydia Howarde Burlesque Troupe will open for a season of two nights in the Town Hall. The Company have lately been performing in the southern towns, and of their capabilities the press speaks very highly. As implied by the title adopted by the troupe, Miss Lydia Howards assumes the leading roles in the pieces they peform, and is supported by several old New Zealand burlesque favorites—notably Misses Nye and A ndrows, and Messrs Power and Fisher. They will to-morrow produce the comic opera of “ Robinson Crusoe,” and on the following evening “ Pinafore ” jwill be placed on the boards. •

Teachers’ Association. —There was no meeting of this association on Saturday, owing to the bad state of the weather. Dogs Beware.—Dogs found tresspassing on Mr J.' Gordon’s premises in the future will be destroyed. Licensing Court. The adjourned sitting of the Licensing Commissioners for the Ashburton district will take place to-morrow.

Personal.— We regret to hear that Sergeant Felton has had another attack of his old chest complaint, and has been confined to his bed for several days. The many friends of this genial officer will very much regret to hear of his indisposition.

Property Leases. —The School Commissioners of Canterbury and the Akaroa Borough Council invite tenders for the lease of certain reserves situate at Seafield and in the neighborhood of Ashburton. The advertisements, giving further particulars, will be found in another column.

Steam v. Printing. —A very sensible conclusion was arrived at the other evening by the Greymouth Literary Club. The question was—“ Which is the greatest benefactor to humanity; steam or printing ?” It was decided that printing was morally the greater benefactor, while steam was physically.

Mr Weston and the Reefton Electors. —Mr Weston addressed the Reefton electors on Saturday night. Nothing could exceed the enthusiasm with which he was received. A resolution to the effect that he was a fit and proper person to represent the constituency was carried unanimously, every person in the room voting for it.

Accident at Rakaia. — A man named O’Conner whilst engaged on the embankment for the temporary bridge, (Rakaia, met with a rather serious accident on Friday. He was working a two-horse scoop, and, whilst holding the handles, overbalanced himself and was thrown forward in front of the scoop, which passed over him breaking his arm. Dr MacKenzie attended the sufferer. The Gale on Saturday. —The weather on Saturday and the two preceding days and nights will be long remembered by inhabitants of Ashburton, as being one of the most severe the place has experienced for some long time past. The wind fell towards evening, and about 9 o’clock it ceased raining, the night turning into a clear moonlight and frosty one. The weather previous to this, however, was so severe that all business in the town had to be suspended, and with the exception of a solitary tobacconist’s establishment, the town was wrapped in its usual dreary evening aspect by the time the storm had ceased. Several places in the town were flooded on the ground floor, but no damage, so far as we can ascertain, was done by the gale.

The Comet. —The comet was unusually bright last evening, doubtless owing to the ecliptic phenomena. Speaking thereof, a Wellington exchange gives the following “It is best seen about 6 p.m. and shortly before sunrise. Some people have imagined that the comet visible in the morning is not the same as that visible in the evening, because the former appears much more brilliant and the tail extended in a different direction. This, however is easily explained, the greater apparent brightness in the morning being due to the absence of moonlight and gaslight, and to the increased clearness of the early morning atmosphere, while the change of relative positions would account for the altered appearance of the tail. It

is supposed that the celestial visitor is Pons’ comet, last seen in 1812, and until lately supposed to have a period of 71

years. Later calculations, however, have reduced this to 69 years, which would make it due in 1881, instead of 1883, and astronomers have been on the look-out

for a comet this year. At the same time, the one now in sight is quite likely to be

a new comet, and it is possible that the small comet, said to have been seen by some Wellington observers, may be the comet of Pons. Or both may be new comers. Doubtless, some fuller information on the. subject will, ere long, b« forthcoming. ”

’ The Struggle for Liberty in Russia. —At a meeting held at the Slavonic Club, 1 London, recently to express sympathy : with those persons who are now advocati ing Russian liberty, one of the speakers asserted that Nihilism would never be put down until the present system of i Government was altered, and its abuses done away with. The present Czar must 1 not think that he will reign long if ho did 1 as his father had done. The people re- ' quired liberty, the people required a constitution, the people required all those privileges which other nations enjoyed, and if he did not introduce a constitution and cease to kill the poor victims who were struggling for liberty, the fight for freedom would be carried on to the bitter end. The meeting further expressed the opinion that the new Czar, Alexander 111., had begun his reign with a disgraceful act of ignominy, in carrying out the sentence of death upon a woman, contrary to previous practice and traditions in Russia, no such execution having taken place there for the last 150 years. This referred to the execution of Miss Peroffskaja, who was a lady of noble birth. Her grandfather was a Minister in Russia ; her father was one of the Governors of St. Petersburg. ‘When she was fifteen years of age she saw her father obeying the behests of a despotic Government. Not being able to bear the sight, she ran away from her father’s house, went among the people who were trying to free her father’s nationality, and worked as a peasant girl for her own living. At last when she was ready to assist in promoting the cause, she displayed that energy which woman possesses, and she gladly died for the.eauso of Russian freedom. Two Dromios.— The following amusing scene in the Waimate Court is related by the local Times : —“ The case of alleged arson at Johnston’s was proceeding, when a witness named David M’Cley was called for. After shouting out his name without response, the eye of Sergeant Ramsay lighted, as he believed, upon Davie himself, sitting obdurately irresponsive among the audience. Striding up to his man, the Sergeant directed him to step up to the witness-box, which he stoutly declined to do, and the Sergeant, deeming the majesty of the law outraged, appealed to the presiding magistrate, informing him that David M’Cley was present but refused to give evidence. Forthwith an order was issued to bring him up nolens volens, and, marshalled by the police, the supposed David speedily made his appearance in the witness-box. To him then the caution was severely administered that unless he forthwith told all he knew about the matter ho would be committed for contempt, and the witness having been duly sworn, the examination commenced. Inspector Pender: “ Your name is David M’Cley ?” Witness : “ No, it is not.” The Inspector: ‘’'But you have been known by that name ? ” Witness: “Not that I am aware of.” Inspector: “You have been working with a threshing machine at the Waihao 1” Witness: “ No, I have not." Inspector: “ What is your name, then ?” Witness : “ Joseph Andrews.” Inspector : “ Well, what do you know about this matter 1” Witness :“ Nothing whatever.” Just at 1 this stage, David M’Cley himself appeared ■ on the scene, and was so singularly like 1 the witness that the cause of the mistake 1 was easily apparent, and Joseph Andrews < stood down to allow the real Simon Pure < to give evidence. It is to be hoped (adds 1 our contemporary), however, that neither i of them will got into trouble, as other- i wise there might some day be a still more 1 awkward case of mistaken identity. 1

Borough Council. —An ordinary meeting of this body will take place this evening.

Chess Club. —The inclemency of the weather on Saturday night prevented a meeting of the members of this Chib.

The Balance on the Bight Side.— The total receipts of the Wellington Industrial Exhibition are L3SO, and the expenses L 220. Inquest on McG'arry. —At the inquest on the body of Edward McGarry. found floating in the Auckland harbor, an open verdict was returned.

Ceased Publication.—The Waikato Mail has ceased publication. It is rumored that it was bought by Mr Edgcombe of the Waikato Tk iss.

Supreme Court, Timaru. —On Saturday the man Egan, for arson, was sentenced to six months. John Scott, for arson, was found not guilty, and John Johnston, for the same offence, was found guilty, and sentenced to four years.

A Big Legacy. —lt is not often that a man is surprised with the news that he has been left L 132,000. Yet (the Greg River Argus says) it is stated on good authority that a person now employed in Greymouth has received a letter stating that he has been bequeathed that amount.

Curious Phenomenon. —The Thames Advertiser reports that a curious phenomenon can be seen on the Tararu Creek, about three-quarters of a mile above the junction with the Ohio stream, in the shape of a large kauri tree growing on the top of solid rook. The tree must be over 80 feet in heighth and about four feet thick, and hai as healthy an appearance as one growing out of nutritious soil. Eclipse of the Moon. —A total eclipse of the moon occurred last evening, and the weather being remarkably flue was distinctly visible. The first contact with the penumbra took place at 3h 45m p. m.; the first contact with the shadow at 4h 4ltn p.m.; the beginning of the total phase at 5h 44m p.m.; the middle of the eclipse at 6h 23ra p.m.; the end of the total phase at 7h 3m p.m.; the last contact with the shadow at 8h Gm p.m.; the last contact with the penumbra at 9h 2m p.m. Magnitude of the eclipse (moon’s diameter=l), 1,348. Becognition Tea Meeting. — A tea meeting is to be held in the Primitive Methodist Church to-morrow evening, for the purpose of according a welcome to the Bev. John Nixon, who was recently appointed to the pastorate of the Wills street congregation. A number of musical pieces will be gone through at the meeting after the tea, and several ministers and other gentlemen will give addresses. As some misunderstanding is

likely to arise in consequence of an advertisement in these columns, on Saturday night, announcing that the meeting was postponed, wo have been requested to draw .attention to the fact of the meeting taking place to-morrow night, the committee having good reasons for adhering to their original intentions.

“One at a Time.” —An hotel-keeper residing in the thirsty town of Hay, Now South Wales, had a cockatoo, whose perch was usually in the bar. At this hotel there was a brisk bar trade, and occasionally a dozen of thirsty souls would pop in and call for drinks simultaneously. On such occasions the barman was in the habit of saying “ one at a time, gentlemen ; don’t rush a fellow.” One day, the cockatoo was missing from his perch, and the owner, upon going in search of him, found him in an adjacent paddock, surrounded by a flock of crows, who seemed bent on his destruction. The owner arrived in time to carress poor cocky just before he died, and to hear him feebly exclaim, “one at a time gentlemen ; don’t rush a fellow.” The Debt of Queensland. The people of Queensland are piling up their State debt at a rate which proves them to to be exceedingly sanguine, and they have obtained a pre-eminence in this doubtful career second only to our own coleny. In 1861, with a population of about 35,000, their debt was only 170,000, or L2 per head. In 1871 the population had grown to L 125,000, and the debt to L 4,000,000, or above L 32 per head. In 1880, with about 225,000 people, the debt amounted to L 12,000,000, or L 54 per head. Most of this money has been obtained from England at about 4J per cent., so that, including English investment in Queensland banks and land companies, the colony has to remit above L 600,000 a-year in the shape of dividends and interest. The revenue proper is about L 1,000,000, and about L 500.000 more is derived from land sales.

Mediums in Trouble.— An extraordinary trial (says ihe Some Sews) came to an end in London on Tuesday, April 12. A professional medium, Mrs Fletcher, and her husband, were accused of obtain* ing large sums of money and jewels from Mrs Hart-Davies by systematically imposing on her credulity and representing themselves as in commun’cation with the spirit of her mother, to whom the simpleminded lady was much attached. Under the impression that she was obeying the maternal will, Mrs Hart-Davie» gave her diamonds and her bank-notes to the Fletchers. At last she began to be suspicious, and to rebel against the authority of the Fletchers. Proceedings were instituted against them. The husband fled, leaving his wi f e to bear the brunt, and Mrs Fletcher was sentenced to a ytar’s imprisonment with hard labor. Early Marriages in India.—A singu-

lar ceremony was recently (says the Times of India) witnessed in Manockjee Sheet’s Wadi, Bombay, when seven happy couples belonging to the Parseo community were united in the holy bonds of matrimony. These aspirants to Hymeneal bliss were excedingly young, as may be gathered from the fact that the eldest was only fifteen years, while the youngest bridegroom was about fifteen months, and the youngest brido a blushing beauty of nine months. Of course, the immature age of the two latter prevented their taking any active part in the ceremony, beyond giving vent to their feelings in true infantile fashion, and the marital bond was tied while each child was seated in its mother’s lap. The scene, as one can well imagine, created much amusement among the spectators, and wo are told that the advocates of early marriages were exceedingly rejoiced at ihe strange spectacle.

Stock. —lt is stated in Auckland that Dr Weir (the gentleman who was chiefly instrumental in getting together a magnificent stud for Mr Seland Stanford, the Californian Railway King) has engaged the whole of one side of the Zealandia on her next voyage from Sun Francisco, for the accommodation of hisjiorses. As a first instalment, ho brings three mares, six stallions and oao gelding, all of the purest blood. The first stallion is a magnificent blood by Young Vermont out of Old Vermont, 10 hands and half an inch high, 6 years old. His time for a mde is 2min 26 secs. The second is the bay stallion Stride awav by Elmo. He is 16 hands, 4 years old, and trots a mi’o in 2min 40:ecs. The third is a chestnut stallion, General Lee, 4 years old. His record at three years old was 2min 15£ secs. The others are—Dapple, bay stallion, 5 years, 15 hands 3 inches; mahogany chestnut stallion Primero, by Elmo, 10 hands (when 2 years old the owner was offered 10,000 dollars for this horse by Mr Leland Stanfrod); one bay stallion (two year colt); one ditto gelding (not for sale); one chestnut filly, two years, Hattie Pear, out of Elmo. She has the best two-mile record in the United States, and was sold for L 3,000. Dr Weir takes his horses to Sydney and Melbourne, but it is possible that endeavors will be made to have at least one stallion left in New Zealand.]

New Cab Proprietor.— lt is notified by an advertisement appearing elsewhere that Mr R. Walsh has started here as a cab proprietor. His customers will doubtless receive every attention and civility at his hands.

Chinese Enterprise. — There is talk (the Cromwell Argus says) of a strong company of Chinese having combined to carry out a gigantic mining operation, being no less than bringing the water of the Nevis river to operate on the alluvial deposits of the Bannockburn. The undertaking will cost a lot of money, as the labor and outlay of capital must necessarily be very great ; but if the scheme should be carried out—and authorities say it is practicable—the extent of auriferous ground the water would command is very wide and all carrying gold in more or less payable quantities. If there is any truth in the rumor, we much regret that Chinese are the movers, as it will result in the district being inundated by Mongolian laborers.

Accidental Poisoning. —A shocking case of wholesale poisoning has occurred at Binbrook, a village on the Lincolnshire Wolds. Mrs Gibson, the wife of a shepherd, made a number of cheese-cakes. After eating one of them she suddenly became unwell, and the neighbors who visited her, and who had eaten some of the cakes, were also taken ill. Upon testing some of the cakes, it was discovered that the woman had mistaken a tin of arsenic for ground rice, and had mixed the poison in her pastry. The arsenic, which was used by her husband in dressing sheep, was kept in a cupboard in a tin canister precisely similar to that which contained the ground rice. The woman died a few hours after she had eaten the cake, before medical aid could be obtained, and eight or nine of the neighbours remained for some time seriously ill from the effects of the poison.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 369, 13 June 1881

Word Count
3,067

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 369, 13 June 1881

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