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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1881.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 4.30 p.m.]

Crowded Out. —Owing to pressure on our advertising columns, we are compelled to hold over an interesting letter from our Sydney correspondent.

Art Union.—A notification postponing the art union for a saddle and bridle appears in another column.

Tenders. —Particulars of tenders required for work at Coldstream by Mr 11. Gilling, and for fencing, appear elsewhere.

Under Distraint. —A notification of a sale of furniture, at the Hindhope hotel, on Friday (to-morrow) under distraint for rent, at the suit of Zander against Little, appears elsewhere.

River Up.—The Rakaia river commenced rising very rapidly yesterday, the cause evidently being the action of nor’westers on the snow on the ranges in the vicinity of the river. Ashburton Hotel.— This property was submitted to tho public, by auction, today, by Messrs H. Henderson and Co., and was purchased by Mr M'Kenzie, one of the partners in the present proprietary, for the sum of Jj4,100. Missionary Meeting. —A public meet ing is to take place in the Wesleyan Church this evening, when addresses will be delivered by several gentlemen, on matters relating to the Wesleyan Foreign Missions.

A Slight Increase.— Tho population of the electoral district of Waitaki is 13,348, made up of 7,319 males and 6,020 females. At the census in 1878 it was 11,595. Unsaleable. —Mr Gardiner’s last shipment of Bundoora yearlings not having been sold, are being taken back to Victoria by the Ringarooma. Only one was disposed of—a black filly by Fortrose — for LIOO.

Divorce Court. —At the sitting of the Supreme Court in divorce proceedings, which will commence at Wellington on Monday next, the following business is set down for transaction : Bailey u Bailey, for hearing ; Hill v. Hill, for trial; Gilfillan v, Gilfillan, for hearing.

Farm. — Mr T. Bullock has for sale 127 acres land and building thereon, suitable for dairy farm, fronting the Wakanui creok.

Ashburton Sparrow Club. —A meeting of this club is convened for Saturday afternoon next, at the Commercial Hotel.

The Premier. — Th e Ellesmere Guardian states that it is the intention of the Hon. J. Hall to address his constituents in the course of about ten days. Crushed. —A gold-miner named Herickson has been killed in his tunnel at Waimangoroa by a stone crushing his head.

The Bible in Schools. —The Timaru school committee have resolved, by a large majority, not to favor the reading of the Bible in schools.

Postal.—Mails for the United Kingdom and Australian colonies, per Ringarooma, will close at the Bluff on Friday, 13th inat., at 11.30 a.m., to-moiTow.

Mr Saunders at Waikato —Mr Saunders met the Waikari constituency last evening, there being a full house. He received a vote of thanks and confidence at the conclusion of his address. Wanted. —ln our “ wanted ” column this evening their appear advertisements offering an engagement to a general servant, and for situation wanted by a general servant, and by a young man as working manager or overseer of a'farrn.

Employment of Females Act. —The result of the police inspection of the manufactories in Auckland was that not a single one complied with the provisions of the Employment of Females Act. The employers have been allowed a fortnight’s grace.

Supreme Court. —At the Supreme Court, New Plymouth, John O’Shannessy, for shooting a horse, the property of James Hansen, was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment. Rakiora, a native, for stealing sheep at Capo Egmont, was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment. This concluded the criminal calendar, and the Judge discharged the jury.

Important Sales. —Elsewhere will be found particulars of an important sale of farm stock, &c., to be held by Messrs R. Wilkin and Co. at the Grange, on Monday, 23rd inst. Under instructions from Mr Joseph Clark, of Longbeach, the same firm will submit by public auction, on Thursday next, horses, harness, implements, sheep, pigs, &c., at the Tinwald yards.

Canterbury Cottrsing Club. —The annual meeting of this Coursing Club was commenced yesterday, when the first round in the Derby and Oaks were disposed of. The following are the dogs now left in :—Derby—Deerfoot, Talbot, The Wizard, Le Loup, Sir Roger, Hopfactor. Canterbury Oaks—Bessie Bell, Desdemona, Ho, and Carmen.

South Canterbury A.A.C.—The annual meeting of this Club was commenced yesterday, the following being the events and results :—IOO yards, 440 yards, long jump, hop, step, and jump, and 250 yards, won by J. S. Smith; half mile flat race and ladies cup steeplechase, won by A. S. Baker ; pole jump, won by S. Brown ; 2 miles walking race, won by E. Rhodes ; high jump, Mr F. N. Robinson. Mr Robinson ran second to Mr Smith, in the 100 yards, and 440 yards, and was also second to him in the long jump, and hop, step, and jump. 1.0.G.T. —The usual weekly meeting of the Safe Retreat Lodge, No. 240, was held last night in the Templar Hall. There was a good attendance. After transacting the usual routine business, the officers for the present quarter were installed by D.G.W.C.T. Bro. W C. Davis, assisted by Bros. Cook and Chappel, as follows :—Bro. R. J. Murray, W.C.T.; Bro. J. Leitch, W.Y.T.; Bro. J. Hardley, W.S.; Bro. K. Sando, W.C.; Bro. W. Dally, W.F.S.; Bro. J. Mullaney, W.T.; Bro. O. Vincent, W.M.; Bro. L. F. Andrews, W.1.G.; Bro. A. Mullaney, W.0.G.; Sis. W. C. Davis, W.L.H.S. After a vote of thanks to the installing officers, the Lodge closed in the usual manner. Templar Hall Company. —The meeting of shareholders of the above company which was to be held last evening, lapsed for want of a quorum, and it was announced that the meeting would be held on Thursday, the 19th inst., at the same time and place. A meeting of directors was then held, when the question «f lighting the Hall with gas was contemplated, and the secretary instructed to communicate with the Gas Company on the subject, and ascertain the cost of fittings, &c. After consideration of several communications and passing accounts for payment, the directors adjourned. Gold at the Waiho. —The Waimate Times of yesterday reports that a sample of gold-bearing quartz was brought into town on Saturday from somewhere on the Waiho, by a man named Eades. It is white quartz broken off from the outcrop, and contains very fine gold distributed throughout. A portion crushed in a mortar was tested for the precious metal and gave a prospect equal to half an ounce to the ton. It is understood that Eades has notified his intention to claim the reward offered by the townspeople of LSOO, and mentioned by us in a recent issue. The Schoolmaster Abroad. An Auckland exchange has the following : That the schoolmaster has still plenty to do in this province, the following copy of a public notice posted in various places in Warkworth during last week will bear ample testimony. The advertisement is supposed to have been written by one pretending to belong to one of the learned occupations. We give the spelling, punctuation, &c., in strict accordance with the original, a copy of which is in our possession :—“ A meeting will be held on the IGth day of April Saturday Night 7 PM at Mr Southcote’s House blow the Cohop To Inorgorate a Lodge of the Independent Order of odd Fellows Manchester’s Unity. ” “Mr Southcote’s house ”is supposed to mean Mr Southgate’s, and “ blow the Cohop ” is conjectured to be the writer’s way of describing where Mr Southgate’s house is situated, below the Cooperative Store. “ Inorgorate ”is a new way of spelling a not uncommon word.

A Brutal Master. Tho Waikato police laid three informations against Shepherd, a Whatawhata settler, for illnsing John Muir and Elizabeth Hill, children from the Home for Neglected Children. One information charged Shepherd with tying Mnir to a dray and flogging him with supplejacks; another with knocking down and cruelly beating the girl; and a third with neglecting to provide them with proper food and clothing. A constable went to -the farm to investigate. Tho boy is about eleven years of age. It is said that tho boy was lodged in a place little better than a pigstye, and his food was thrown to him like a dog, and that he had even got nothing better at times to eat than raw potatoes. He had tried on more than one occasion to escape, but was retaken. Another boy had bolted, and succeeded in escaping. The constable saw quite sufficient on arrival at tho place where the boy was lodged, and heard enough from his lips, to warrant him in removing him at once to Hamilton, and to return for the girl. The accused was brought up yesterday, and the charges of ill-treating the boy Muir were dismissed, as the evidence was contradictory, and the boy was confused as to dates. For the assault on tho girl ho was fined L 5, or three months. The Magistrate directed the police to find tho boy who is stated to have witnessed tho assault on Muir, but who had absconded from Shepherd’s service, and if his evidence corroborated tho children’s, to indict the defendant for perjury.

A Stray Tyke.—Mr Porter advertises that a black dog has come astray on his premises.

Dancing. —Devotees of the Terpsichorean art are informed by advertisement, published in another column, that the quadrille party at Tinwald will commence in the Temperance Hall at that place to-morrow night. Discharged. —At the Magistrate’s Court, Wellington, yesterday, Ellen Frost, Mary O’Kane, and Ellen Nolan appeared cn remand, on the information of the late Superintendent Whitelaw, charging them with having on February 10th ill-treated a female patient in the Asylum. The information was laid just previous to the appointment of the recent Royal Commission, but was adjourned to enable the Commissioners to send in their report before hearing the charge. The Bench was of opinion that there was not sufficient evidence of ill-treatment of the patient, and accused were discharged.

A Chance for the Revenue. —Here is a hint for the Colonial Treasurer. The San Francisco Pacific nays that “St. Valentine’s Day has come to bo one of inflictions and impositions ; a d;iy for the indulgence of coarse tastes and low sentiments —when the vulgar-minded feel free to engage in practical joking through slang print, doggerel, daub, caricature, and vile cartoon ; and when the envious, jealous, and hateful seize the opportunity to inflict pain on their rivals and foes, and to avenge themselves in mean and cowardly ways. . . . We wish the Internal Revenue Department would put a specific tax of a dollar each upon everything that purports to be a 1 valentine.’ ”

Distressed Mariners. —The New Zealand Herald of the 28th ult. contains an account of the sufferings of the crew of the brig Wild Wave, which arrived at Auckland from Kaipara on April 27th. The brig had met with rough weather, and came into port with a temporary rudder, and her deck showing evident signs of a clean breach being made over her by very heavy seas. The crew had during the storm been suffering from want of water, and the following part of the description may be read with interest. At 4 p.m., when abreast of Spirits Bay, the s.s. Tararua was signalled. Captain Garrard at once bore down, and manifested a most sympathetic spirit, rendering every assistance in his power. But the most gracious boon was a present of a cask and two breakers of water. This was eagerly partaken of, as no one on board had drunk anything since leaving Kaipara. The pangs of thirst had been terrible, and various expedients were resorted to to assuage the agony, amongst them being that of the sucking of potatoes. This done, the Tararua proceeded on her voyage, but not before receiving the hearty thanks of both captain and men. The Law of Cheques.—ln deciding an action brought to recover the amount of a dishonored cheque, Mr Ward, R.M., recently made the following remarks on the law of cheques :—“ I find it laid down that where a cheque is drawn it must he presented by the receiver, or some person for him, within what is technically termed a ‘ reasonable time. ’ For a very long time the judges in our English Courts could not determine what was a reasonable time in which cheques, bills of exchange, and documents of a similar character were to be presented, but had ultimately arrived at this decision :—That when a cheque was drawn on a bank in a town in which the receiver resided, it should be presented on the following day. If the cheque was drawn on a bank away from the town, then a reasonable time for carriage must be allowed, which would, of course, be determined according to circumstances. Although a cheque should be presented within that time, the fact will not exonerate the drawer from payment. He is liable for the cheque for six years. If anything should happen during that time, for instance if the bank should fail, and the cheque had not been presented within a reasonable time, then the receiver would be the loser ; for the reason that the money was in the bank at the time the cheque was drawn, and had it been presented would have been paid. A man may refuse to accept a cheque in payment for services rendered, but having accepted it he must lose no time in presenting it.” In a Fix. —During the Indian Debate in the Lords, the Princess of Wales, the Duchess of Connaught, and the Duchess of Teck graced by their presence the narrow projection which runs round three sides of the House, and is by courtesy dignified with the name of the Peeresses’ Gallery. Sir William Knollys, the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, who, in spite of his eighty-four years and the inevitable feebleness attendant upon his great age, bears himself with the dignity of an old soldier, escorted the Duchess of Teck to her place, and a little later preceded the Princess of Wales to the adjoining seat. The Royal ladies being comfortably settled down, the aged gen eral bowing low, essayed to retire, but found himself in the awkward position of having to turn his back upon one or the other of them in order to reach the nearest door. Here was a pretty fix for a gallant old soldier! Sir William hesitated, and the difficulty of his position being perceived by both ladies, a little rivalry arose as to which should show the greatest respect for one who had been for many years an honoured officer of the Prince of Wales’s household. The Princess seized his hand and drew him gently towards her as though to whisper something in his ear. The Duchess of Teck simultaneously caught hold of the other hand with the same object, and for a moment “ Black Rod,” bewildered by the pressing attentions lavished upon him, seemed at a loss what to do. The Duchess, however, gave the pas to her royal kinswoman, and the charming little incident terminated with the disappearance of the gallant warrior, his venerable countenance suffused with a flush of gratified pride at the honour paid by such exalted personages to his years and faithful service. Homo Paper.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810512.2.8

Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1881., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 342, 12 May 1881

Word Count
2,548

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit. THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1881. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 342, 12 May 1881

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