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School Committee. —A meeting of the Ashburton School Committee will be held this evening. Fatal Accident. —A man named Hoey was killed by a fall of earth at Springston yesterday. High School. —lt is notified elsewhere that this school will re-open for the second term on the 18th inst. Insolvency. —A notification of the filing of a declaration of insolvency on the part of Daniel Evans, farmer, Waterton, appears elsewhere.

Received the Royal Assent.—A despatch has been received by the Governor announcing that the Queen-in-Council has assented to the “ Deceased Wife’s Sister Marriage Bill," which was passed by the Assembly last session.

Police Intelligence. —This morning, at the Police Court, H. Hamblin, a refractory inmate of the Old Men’s Home, was charged with vagrancy, and was remanded for three days. Cornelius Sweeney was fined 6s, or in default twenty-four hours’ imprisonment, on a charge of drunkenness. The same accused, on a charge of using obscene language in a public place, was sentenced to three days’ hard labor.

Attempted Suicide. —A scene of a somewhat sensational character (says this morning’s Press ) occurred last evening, near the Worcester street bridge. A young lady—respectably connected, it is believed, and well dressed—was observed to throw herself into the river, apparently determined on suicide. AMr Day, of the Telegraph Department, was present, and at once rescued the rash one from her watery “refuge.” She came out none the worse for her damp experience. Borough Council. —A special meeting of this body was held this afternoon. There were in attendance his Worship the Mayor, Crs Roberts, Parkin, Si. Hill, Friedlander, and Williamson. The meeting was held under the Municipal Corporations Act for the purpose of adopting the Balance Sheet for the year ended March 31st last. It was resolved, on the motion of Cr Williamson —“ That the Balance Sheet as read be adopted and signed by the Mayor. This was the whole of the business and the meeting then terminated.

The Late Accident at Balclutha.— An inquest was held at Balclutha, on Wednesday, on the body of John Russell who was drowned some time ago from the’ Balclutha Bridge works, and whose body was found at Stirling the other day, A verdict of “Accidental drowning” was returned, and the jury agreed that no blame was attributable to anyone. Deceased was single, and had no relatives in the colony, and was a native of the South of Ireland.

Aquatics. —The following account of the first contest between Trickett and Kirby is from a late Australian exchange : —“ A sculling match took place on April 19 on Southampton Water between Kirby and Trickett. The water was rough, a strong north-easterly wind blowing right across the course during the time the race was being rowed, and Trickett was nearly swamped. Kirby led at the start, and for a third of the distance there was a good race. Then Trickett gradually began to move away and won easily. Time, iO^min.”

The Windy North. —But for the erection of the breakwinds which were put up on portions of the Rimutaka incline after the accident, which happened there in September last, there might have been another catastrophe, recently, a very severe gale was experienced in the Wairarapa district, and on the following mortiing it was blowing a perfect hurricane at the scene of the former disaster. The two Fell engines and the breakwinds, however, proved officious in preventing any accident ; though the iron sliding door attached to the cab of the trailing engine was torn off by one of the gusts of wind, and the rod on which it slides was praashed like a pipe-stem. They Couldn’t Agree. —The hearing of the charges of embezzlement of Government money against Wilkinson, at Hawera, occupied the attention of the Supreme Court at New Plymouth, the whole of Saturday. About nine o’clock at night the jury retired, and at eleven they intimated that they were not likely to agree. Judge Richmond said he would return to the Court at twelve, when he would consider whether he would lock them up till Monday morning. At 12 o’clock, there being still no sign of agreeing, the Judge dismissed the jury. The second indictment was proceeded with yesterday.

Fires. —A house, occupied by George Westbury, a plate-layer, at Wangomarino, was burnt down on Sunday night, through a kerosene lamp, which exploded.—The store and residence of D. M. Darroch, at Upper Matakano, was also burnt. The amount of insurance is not known.— Fisher’s coal and wood shed, Wellington, was destroyed by fire last night. The flames had a good hold when first discovered, and as a strong wind was blowing, the building was lowered to the ground. Halley and Ewing’s sawmill and several cottages in the neighborhood of the coal yard, had a narrow escape from destruction. The shed and contents were insured for L2OO in the Union office. The Sparrow Nuisance. —There was not a very large attendance at the meeting held in the Willowby Schoolroom last evening, to take into consideration the small bird pest. Mr S. S. Chapman was voted to the chair, and briefly stated the object of the meeting. It was proposed by Mr John Williams, seconded by Mr Hayman, and carried—-“ That a Sparrow Club be established at Willowby, to be called the Willowby Sparrow Club.” A committee was elected to carry out the objects of the meeting, the members being Messrs John Williams (chairman), Grice, Hayman, S. S. Chapman, and R. Frisby. Mr S. S. Chapman was appointed secretary. It was decided that the members’ fee should be 5s per annum. The chairman and secretary were requested to write to the the large absentee land-owners in the district, asking them to subscribe to the Club. After deciding to hold the next meeting on the 16th May, the proceedings terminated, with a vote of thanks to the chairman.

Tenders. —Mr Pavitt advertises for tenders for ploughing about 80 acres near Dromore.

Postponed. —Mr Bullock’s property sale is postponed from the 21st May to the 28th.

A Homicidal Editor. —Mayne, of the Bathurst Sentinel , has been committed for trial for assault with intent.

More Sydney Centenarians.— John Robertson, an old resident ef Sydney, who had almost reached his 102nd year, died recently.

Serious Accident. —On Saturday evening, Christopher Fleming, a well-known miner, was dangerously hurt by a fall in his claim, near Naseby. He died this morning.

More Libel. —M'Minn, the editor of the Manawatu Standard, swore four criminal informations against the editor of the New Zealand Times on Saturday. Cross informations will be laid.

Steeplechases at Oamaru. —At a meeting, it was decided to hold a steeplechase meeting on June 9. The sum of L2lO will be given in prizes. The progiamrae has not yet been arranged.

Race Privileges. —The sale of the privileges of a publican’s booth, confectioner’s ditto, gate fees, and rights of sports and cards in connection with the County Steeplechases, to be held on the 27th inat., will be disposed of by auction by Mr T. Bullock on Saturday next.

What might be Expected. —Authentic information has been received from Wilcannia of the discovery of an alluvial field 29 miles from Mount Browne, near Vegetable Creek tin mines. The Chinese continue to arrive daily, and now outnumber the adult Europeans three to one.

Freedom op the Press. —A new Press Bill has passed the French Chambers ; henceforth there will be no stamp, no caution money, and no previous authorisation for posting bills, hawking, or for drawings or cariacatures. The Press will be absolutely free.

The Rbbfton Murder.— Very little evidence of any moment was elicited during the hearing of the murder case, at the Resident Magistrate’s Court, Greymouth, yesterday. After the Magistrate had cautioned the prisoner in the usual way, M’Gahey said he had nothing to say, except that he was innocent, and would reserve his defence. He was then committed to take his trial at the next criminal sessions at Hokitika.

Accident. —A rumor gained currency in the town this afternoon to the effect that an infant son of Mr Prendergast had been accidentally drowned in the Wakanui Creek. Enquiry on the part of. our reporter, however, showed that the rumor, although correct in some respects, had considerably magnified the evils resulting. Mr JPrendergast’s little boy fell into the creek on Sunday afternoon, but his screams attracted his father's attention, and he was fortunately rescued, receiving only a severe ducking.

Presence of Mind.— A somewhat alarming accident took place at Drury Lane Theatre the other evening. At the conclusion of tha first act of The World, the act-drop fell forward upon the footlights with a heavy crash. Many of the audience sprang to their feet, and were preparing to leave the theatre, when Mr. W. Rignold, hastily stepping forward motioned to them to remain seated, and assisted by several other members of the company, removed the canvass. The footlights had been promptly turned out, and thus very little damage was done. The act-drop had to be dispensed with for the rest of the evening.

A Village Burnt to the Ground.—A dreadful calamity has befallen the little village of Pierrefitte, in the department of the Correze. The other morning an inhabitant was carrying a pan of burning coal to his cottage, when the wind, which was blowing very hard, drove some of the embers to the thatch, and quickly set fire to the building. Favored by the wind, the flames spread rapidly, and in less than an hour the whole village, with the exception of the school-house and the church, was destroyed. No human lives were lost, but a number of cattle perished in the flames.

The Channel Tunnel. —Satisfactory progress is being made in the preliminary works for the proposed tunnel between Dover and Calais. Its promoters Colonel Beaumont, R.E., and Captain English, R.E —are now able to employ three shifts of men constantly throughout the twenty-four hours, and are sanguine of being able to bore about thirty feet per day when all the machinery is perfected. At present two drills, worked by engines, driven by compressed air, are at work, and about thirty laborers are employed. The bore is seven feet in diameter, and the soil chalk, which is so firm that the engineers are of opinion no brick or cement will be required to shore it up.

Very Sleepy. —Dr Gelineau, of Paris, applies the name narcoleptic—suddenly seized by sleep—to a curious affection. A hale man, in the prime of life, falls fast asleep two hundred times in a day ; his eyelids close, and the fit lasts about five minutes; he dozes off while speaking ; at his meals, in a theatre, at work, when walking; yet his memory remains unaffected ; ho is sharp in his business—a cooper. This is not sleeping dropsy, nor coma, ending in death, peculiar to negi oes of equatorial Africa. It is presumed that the quantity of oxygen accumulated in the nervous centres is too small, or used up too rapidly, or the blood vessels are too narrow.

A Monkey or a Dog.— Mr Spencer Walpole contributes to the new number of MacMillan’s Magazine an interesting paper, upon his late colleague, Frank Buckland, It abounds with genial gossip and pleasant anecdotes about the popular naturalist. “ Once,” says Mr Walpole, “ When Mr Buckland was returning from France, laden as usual with ‘ specimens ’ living and dead, a monkey putting its head out of his pocket attracted the attention of the booking clerk, who insisted, in spite of all evidence to the contrary, that it was a dog, and must be paid for as such. Nettled at this, Buckland plunged his h£y?id into another pocket and produced' a tortoise, and laying it on the sill of the tieket window, said— ‘ Perhaps you will call that a dog too V The clerk inspected the tortoise —‘ No,’ said he, ‘we make no charge for them, they’re insects !’ ”

A Suicidal Hoax. —Some little excitement was caused in Hamilton on Sunday morning (May Ist) by the sight of a man hanging over the river by the neck from one of the projecting flooring beams oi the bridge. Quite a number of persons, accompanied by Constable Wild, hurried to the spot, while Sergeant MoGoven ran down the river in search of a boat or canoe. On reaching the part of the bridge near the east end the supposed man was found to be a cunningly-devised dummy. It was with some difficulty the people on the bridge hauled it up, and Sergeant McGovern after returning from the river side ran hurriedly along the bridge calling to the constable and others to handle the poor fellow less roughly. A shout of laughter, however, revealed the fact that it was a sell. On the back of the figure a paper was pinned saying hard times was the cause. As the dummy now hangs in the police station, it has all the appearance of a man at a very short distanbe.—New Zealand Herald. 1

N. Z. Grand N ational:‘—“ Mazeppa’ ’ fancies Agent and Blush Rose are the two best in this event at the weights.

Good for the Revenue. —A recent haul in the way of the capture of a den of Celestial gamblers made by the police in Mayton realised L6O in the way of fines.

Uncharitable. The Bruce Herald reports that Mr T. Spurgeon when preaching at the Baptist Chapel on the Ist inst., asserted that the late unfortunate passengers in the Tararua perished on account of their sins.

Gold at Waimate. —The residents in the Waimate districts are so confident of the gold bearing resources of the district, that they at present advertise a guarantee, of LSOO as a reward to the discoverer of a payable goldfield in the county. A further reward of LIOO is offered for the discovery of a second payable goldfield.

Hard-Up Civil Servants. —We are informed that the necessities of the telegraphic servants have been so great, in some instances, from reductions and the expenses they have been put to in conao-> quehce of their removals, that they have been compelled to borrow money from their fine fund to enable them to provide the necessaries of life for themselves and their families. Whatever may be our financial difficulties, it is to be hoped that members of the House will lay this fact to their hearts, and, in the desire to spare the calls on the colonial chest, will not inflict needless privations on a body of men who perform the hardest work in the service on the lowest pay. —Wairarapa Standard.

Roslyn Tramway Accident. The inquest on the body of Garrett, who died from injuries received at the Roslyn tramway accident, was continued at Dunedin, yesterday. The relatives of the deceased, the conductor of the cars (Peter Hennan), and the Company, were represented by lawyers. Mr Denniston, having objected to the Coroner’s way of taking the evidence down, provoked the following reply from the Coroner : —“I by no- means underrate the value of lawyers’ services, but at the same time X am convinced we are quite competent to make the fullest inquiry without legal assistance, and on that principle I intend to act.” From a telegram in another column, it will be seen that a verdict of manslaughter was brought against the conductor.

Thb Late Wreck. —A telegram from Wyndham last night says: —“ Contrary to expectation, no more bodies were washed ashore up to ten o’clock yesterday morning. It was hoped, after the eighth day, that the bodies would float and wash in" quickly. Grappling irons have now been provided, which will save the risk hitherto in recovering the dead from the backdraft. When a body was observed, one man was attached to the end of a line, and he rushed into the surf, in order to prevent as fnuch as possible further disfiguration, for it is almost impossible, in their present; decomposed and battered condition, to recognise the features. It appears, from a survey which was made last Friday, that what is known locally as Otara Point is marked on the Admiralty chart as Waipapa Point, and the reefs are shown quite out of position. The wreckage is becoming obscured by the shifting sands, and to show the high sea that must have been running at the time of the disaster, it may be stated that the water has hot since come within twenty yards-of the debris, Strange to say, the barn in which we sleep and the shanty in which we mes? are constructed of the remains of the wreckage of the William Ackers.” By a telegram from Invercargill to-day we learn that eleven bodies were washed ashore on Sunday night at South Otara Point,- including those of Thomas Crawford, Captain Garrard, Dr Campbell’s son, and the body of a lady passenger, undentified, and also the body of a little girl and other males, including a Chinaman ; the r : ght arm of a lady, broken near the shoulder, also came ashore.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810510.2.8

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 340, 10 May 1881

Word Count
2,826

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 340, 10 May 1881

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