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ARRIVAL OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MAIL.

The s.s. City of New York in Quarantine. [by telegraph.] Auckland, To-day. The P.M.s.s. City of New York, on arrival yesterday, signalled for the Health Officer, and Dr Philson boarded her. The captain reported that smallpox was prevailing at San Francisco and Honolulu, but at the latter only among the natives. There had been four cases of measles amongst the children, of whom there are twelve on board. The first case broke out on the 12th April last, and one en the 25th April. One occurred before reaching and the other since leaving Honolulu. One death occurred on the passage —that of the Rev. W. Cruden, who died of dysentery and general debility. He was buried on the following day. Dr Philson decided that the vessel must be quarantined and the mails fumigated. _ She accordingly steamed away to Motuihi.

General Summary. London, April 10. Mr Powell, the Conservative member for Wigan, has been unseated for bribery by Miss Simarie, his fiancee. Herbert Reeves, the tenor, perished by the fire at the opera house, Nice. Herr Moat, the editor of the Friehdut, London, was arrested and the paper suppressed, because in an article he justified the killing of the Czar, the page being surrounded by a blood-red border. The Court said proceedings in the case were not for a State but for police prosecution. Mr Gladstone was loudly cheered when he rose to make his Budget speech. He shewed the gross revenue to be L 84,041,000, this being am increase of L 1,341,000 over the Estimates. . The total from increased taxation was only L 378,000. Many small boats filled with pleasureseekers were capsized, and sixteen lives were lost.

In the Lawson v. Labouchere case the Chief-Justice Coleridge, as Judge, commented severely on Lawson’s conduct relative to the personal fracas question. It was not whether Lawson was a coward in refusing to fight a duel, which he was perfectly right in declining, but whether, having acted as he had, he was a person to complain very much of the subsequent publication of the libel. Judge Coleridge could not help thinking if Lawson refused to fight he should have abstained from subsequent gross and outrageous insult, contained in his message to Cabanche, namely, that ho had threatened him like a dog, and would, under certain conditions, do so again. The Court pointed out that the account of the fracas that appeared in Truth, in the form of a letter from Lawron, was quite a sufficient ground of indictment for libel, even if it had not been published in a newspaper. It was, however, published after an account emanating from the office of the Telegraph,

which appeared in the Manchester Guardian, and after the account had been written by Lawson to the editor of Vanity Fair. Lord Coleridge implied that the letter was written in a braggadocio tone, and he showed that Labouchere was unable, by the nature of the proceedings, to give his account in Ceurt. He strongly stigmatised some of the Telegraph’s personal attacks, particularly on Earl Beaconsfield, which Labouchere had adduced to justify his assertion against Lawson, and said they were a disgrace to journalism. Italy.

The Pope has ordered a strict inquiry into the sacriligeous traffic of spurious relics. The entireastercologicalspecimens, purporting to be the remains of early Christian martyrs, freshly dug from the Catacombs of Rome, have been shipped to America.

Serious floods have occurred at Seville, and many houses in the city have given way before the force of the water. All the valley in the country beyond seems an immense lake, the tops of trees and roofs of churches just appearing above the water, which sweeps along the cattle and crops. The river is five miles broad before it enters Seville. The King has placed his private purse at the disposal of the authorities to relieve the sufferers. The estimated loss is estimated at 1,000,000d01. San Francisco, April 10.

After a trial lasting forty-seven days, Kalloch was acquitted on the charge of murdering DeYoung, of the San Francisco Chronicle. The verdict was hailed with delight by the Sand Lot element of the community, but is causing much dissatisfaction among the more considerate citizens.

The wife of a wealthy Chicago politician has been arrested for stealing 10,000 dollars worth of diamonds in New York. The New York Commissioners expect half a million of European immigrants this year. Father Gavazzi, Italian reformed priest, is preaching at San Francisco to raise funds to assist the Catholic movement in his own country. Commodore Shufeld, UnitedjfStates navy, is selected to reorganise the Chinese naval force.

Chicago has decided not to follow San Francisco in laying wire cable street railroads, as the cost and severity of the climate in the winter might prevent successful operation. The ice at the gorge of the Nebraska river has caused great destruction of property, and the whole of the Plate valley, from Columbus to Fremont, is under water.

The Larillara exploring party in Mexico have exhumed a buried town on the line of the Central railway, which gave evidences of advanced civilisation. They found paved streets, regular atone shop carvings, showing a high order of workmanship. Hanlan, the rower, issues a challenge to meet anybody in the world for any amount up to 18,000 dollars, and beat him by 15 seconds in any race growing out of the challenge. The race to be rowed in Toronto, Canada. Edison’s electric light system has now been completed, and a company is granted permission to lay wires to light New York city. Beecher has preached a discourse against the wide-spread sympathy for murderers and other criminals.

The Chicago socialists have passed resolutions approving the killing of the Czar, whom they styled “ A boulder in the pathway of human progress that had been blown out of the way.” Forsterson, a leading citizen of St Angelo, was deliberately shot in the streets of that city by a young Spanish girl, because he refused marriage as promised. Moody and Sankey have ceased holding revival meetings in San Francisco, and declare themselves disappointed in the results, so far as the number converted is concerned.

The President has declared himself unalterably opposed to Mormonism, and says it must be stamped out. He feels bound to do this, because his predecessors saw fit to recognise the institution by the appointment of Brigham Young, the head of the church, as Governor of the Utah Territory.

Coleman, the alleged Fenian, who was suspended by the London police, as he is supposed to be concerned in the plot to blow up the Manor House on St. Patrick’s Day, has been arrested at New York. Secretary Blane called the attention of the Commissioners of Immigration at New York to the fact that Switzerland is exporting her sick, insane, paupers, and other undesirable people to the United States in numbers.

Sullivan, an associate of Mr Parnell, and one of the traversers, created a row in New York whilst addressing the societies, and stirring up for subscriptions. Salt Lake City has been lighted by the Brush system of electrical light. Pensylvania has passed a Prohibitory Liquor Law. Mark Twain has issued a new book called “The Handbook of Etiquette.” The Prohibitory Liquor Law will be defeated in the Massachusetts Assembly. Beecher surprised his congregation recently by relating in an open meeting, how one of the lambs of his flock having preferred the Roman Catholic communion to that of the Protestant, he took her by the hand and led her to the priest in Brooklyn, telling him he had brought one who had found “ greener ” pastures in your fields than in mine, and he added “ I would so again if necessary.” Hong Kong, March 7.

Page, a British subject, employed by Chinese, and who had killed a smuggler, was thanked therefor by his employer ; but subsequently the British authorities arrested and tried him for murder, but the jury acquitted him. San Francisco, April 13.

Chili has presented the terms of peace to conquered Peru, which stipulates that she must pay the cost of the war, and yield in the provinces of Antofogasta, Tararapaca, and Taara. President Calderon took the oath of office on March 12.

By the bursting of a dam near Mereyel Pesth, in Hungary, the river Keiss overflowed 100,000 acres.

It is now believed that throughout the whole island of Chios, which contained 70,000 inhabitants, 6,000 or 7,000 were killed by an earthquake. Twenty-five per cent, of the survivors were wounded. Only 10 of the inhabitants of Chios (?) were killed. But one man survived in the mines, and 30,000 people are left without shelter.

Hobart Pasha has given orders to prepare for the defence of the Dardanelles against vessels creeping in at midnight. Evictions are going on largely in Ireland. In the County of Tyrone more than 2,000 processes for ejectments have been served. It is said the Nihilists have notified to the Czar that they will lay down their arms in return, among other things, for T?n amnesty for revolutionists. In the meantime, more mines have been discovered near the Imperial Palace.

The Grand Duke Nicholas Constantine Novildi, notorious in connection with the theft of diamonds has been arrested for political intriguing in favor of his father, the brother of the late Czar.

Onions placed in a room where there is a contagious disease are good disinfectants. The amateur laundress should never forget that silk is the product of an insect and not a vegetable formation, and that a very hot iron will cook its fibre and thus destroy its strength and beaqty.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810503.2.10

Bibliographic details

ARRIVAL OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MAIL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 334, 3 May 1881

Word Count
1,599

ARRIVAL OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MAIL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 334, 3 May 1881

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