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A TIGER LILY:

A GOLDEN ROD,

CHAPTER lll —Redeemed With a : Price. —[continued.] And it was hard enough lines for the poor gentleman,, who was as ill to break of his superciliousness, lounging, swaggering-—by way of variety—his utter thriftlessness, his miserable habit of dissipation, as any rogue and criminal of his. darker frauds and crimes. To frequent the Wainwrights? establishment at old St. Boville’s, and behave himself with some regard to steadiness, attention, activity; to hear and reply'to sentiments which, couched in whatever language of chaffing and mockery, were vigorous, dauntless, high-hearted, generous, and pure sentiments as were eyer breathed ; to learn to assist the artists in their work, and to work for himself; —well, it was a light yoke compared to the gyves of the widow's vulgar insolence and grinding tyranny; it was wholesome ait J 7to the atmosphere of brutal ' selfindulgence and ignorant, unreasonable contempt for her neighbor in which she lived. But it. was like breathing the air of a higher latitude, like climbing the steep ascent to that latitude, There was a constant strain, both of body and; mind, on the poor man, under which he half-cracked his jaws with yawning; shrank from staining his fingers, and looked ruefully at the stains when they were incurred; ached all over Kis relaxed, spent body—td.his little finger, on anything like continued exertion ; and felt dismally weary and hopeless of ever being worthy, industrious, enterprising, distinguished, like that other poor man, who could not contemplate the possibility- of being pious a whole day. The worst came last, that the Wainwrights,; though they were very good to him, could not sympathise with his trials. Still Fred Hopkins held on, creeping like a whining schoolboy to the glass house, : sitting downj;anddumbly nursing, his elbow, when he "struck it and caused it to ; tingle iri' his manoeuvres; seldofn'Coming libaT to animation and save when he could fling himself away fkmr focuses and shadows; and indulge in His beloved 'smoke — : WithaF ‘the Txiost patient, harmless,, sweet-mahnered - of .half-reformed , r prqdig^U;: -j . Wainwrights did not let him gQ,tho.ugh

|G r e sensational myth of the glass house with all its contents being blown into mid air one day by Hopkins’s -carelessness and recklessness, and loudly at some of

Mr Hopkins’s performances, at which Lauderdale frowned.

To turn back and begin again far in life, is a terrible humiliation and drudgery of recantation and renewal—a desperate, almost childishly mad undertaking. But Gregory and LauderMr Hopkins for assisting them T liberal limit of their means the- first > fee he, had ever worked faywhirtr.Thwi«

wretched, and sentiment was ashamed, not"elated Some long-Sufterinjf turned up when they heard thflt 1 Hopkins was making faint* attebipf'at^ L an honest shift, freed - him j his more ’ pressing had not been so easy in/ his circtiron stances, or so fresh for the campaign of life, since hc Tan» td Had- it not beem/fdr 1 0 coming due with no provisioh to Iriefet

it, Fred flopkins wquld-haye beerfc-tqQi.a conifer table and independents; i he would not have known himself. Not that he troubled himself abbut that'bill] ~ or any other bni,‘ witlr it^ ! day ; 6fdbbft, ; f 1,11 its days of grace, its ( .mexorahU. ; ci^ TL ing fall on him and his faintly dawning ‘ prospects of better days; vand better things. He. had been so lpng vadcustofned to bills in their ostentatious, often audadous promises sneaking renewals, ’wMyj ip paying over, mm f \over again,, before they ate returned? of A pro~ - / tested, that a vulgarly -facfetioiigrmaST" might have said lie had &£en up giiiong i people;!, bf:, a _ bilious temperament. He" had*beTOme a fatalist where.,bills vyefe- jqppperpedji. <ij he was a fatalist with respect, ftp; jnost events, as wasters, wanters, and- ruined men of every; stamp are wont toßbe/f Jo Lauderdale Wainwright, td whonij/fn her growing; charaeter i; ‘W ! cbnfMahit, Fred tippfeins had mentioned- his-bifl, 1 " nwas much more takep ypabput itOp- J? proach than its : sigrieiv * * * again‘she anticipated Jhe d seated, and counted what sum would ‘

satisfy-its! dft^nd. , ; Sfce hgtd t T in consulting with Gregory on the subject, because it qwasj anbther man’s " private affairs, and

thodgh Mr;Hopkins might-hayfecgtven-r^a her ' liberty, Gregory himself too manly to like it j and A technicalities, and overwhelming statements of the. infectious nature ofojeb&n? and of the danger of starting,leak»y which could not, be : stopped,-' by,tsqj, c much as touching There was- no use in Seeking to<r; 3 . arouse ~ Mr. Hopkins's anxiety pin A l ’-”;" subject- which might have been sup-.; 1 ; 1, posed supremely interesting to him. To the Bohemian the, jevjlj tiay is. rr far off, till ill doom" descMds,"and the

Bohemian is' far less horiCst 'antflliAP.os]

capable of reflection 'oh' question of bills than he is likely,to be on-that of entertttg a bank as T cferll^ 110 ' at nine hours a day and a sraaO_fixg4 0 ; salarjvqrof converting: theFijlislanderf Mr Hopkio& was a-geeat* way,', iwpiii ~ « tiling cured to the exsfqt : /9fr &89ti£C?av from' banishing’ the most distant idea -- of.a .bill’s becoming due until he could get somebody to sign or discount 1 -ajiothqr for him. ; : . ; r tin nr.

There was a curious fascination for, I sanderdaleWainwrightinFred Hopkitfs/. . and what had been • his Cgre^iotis' ih- J ‘ n corrigible folly, all the v mof6 : -fe^r«ig^oHji i:i, ' ? add incorrigible as folly, that itwas nd«Vf , the vicipuis depravity, the deliberate treachery,; the vindictiveness, the. revenge of some men. The charm did ir not lie in the Tailed - good utterly rubbed:.off—and ilhe lingering T polish which had caught;- the widow, Lauderdale cared for rionh of these things. A man might be a very 1 Addhilh' arid she would.only notices lhe T feci ; *a» a furnishing iaJgood specimen of a head; she was ana s** 5 ** hardly ever minded it/ ' ceased to mind it. Neither was it that she was for a moment deceived in Fred Hopkins, or trusted him beyond the breadth of a: straw;ornustoOkherrelation to him. But she was fascinated by the protection she afforded him, the dependence he had upon her/ Oi LUO -.«K Someone has written, thatgopd ..*-. women may not be destined or fitted for wives, but that all may be? mothera-rrb:.-: mothers in the sense of cherishing, ministering to, and caring for heedless children of all ages. TO sbme women : - } —and these: the best—there is i a- f ;i greater necessity to protect than to ,be . protected; they want sons and daughters more than husbands. Lau* derdale had missed hers till noy v . The U J hard obligation of earning a livelihood ' had occupied her; and her brother

Gregory, with his wise saws, his stoical

powers, his gipsy training* was, *• thoroughly independent person. ‘There is only brie way in which I can help him,’ : said Lauderdale to her-

self, taking upon her the bill which has been the'end of many a poor woman—- ‘ I cannot make a run over with Greg

to see the cathedrals, town-halls, gateways of Belgium as' we promlsea

ourselves. But if I■ can work up thee u series of views which the old St. Seville

man ordered, and Gregory surrendered

to me, and get them finished in time, I may lend Mr Hopkins what will

off enough of this score to give him

another chance of final release fmd, new - adventure, if he is ever to.be ableto , take it.’

Lauderdale made good her word* by-, working steadfastly, with feverish in-

tentness and engrossment, ridges of hills, Tabte-lafKls WiborS, v ' i '

billowy seas of corn, surrounded ; by' , ' i "' hanging ‘ shaws,’ where the rusting Or bracken, and the = reddening- of : wild cherry, oak, and beech, showed the- 5: " finger-marks of autumn. fc) ! worked irrespective of early of shower and blast ; she disdmn^/t^j rJ-n bad cold and hard cough which she .!« caught in the process, and continued-

to go out to compete, asshe said r 4 vlApo 1 tlie washerwomen; 'still istandinff half-frozen feet, washing Parisian rashioif 1 in the Roani. ; j <;- a < r i --^

, ‘Call a halt,JLaud/ : £r^prv^ohr' n ejected— ‘ you must digesi You will, niiss the finesti.tauchea .ily a tl‘ * tou make us- feel so dettdl 1 bttfi, - Miss \Vainwnght. ,£: Hopkins, politically, is despair, fight off his elegantlyiQDned, light 1 head.' * YtpiH tgkft g ( breath by going ahead liku-.a. Yankee. respectr.UonoUr Baioi; But Lauderdale had no respect for

their nerves, or her own health, or any other right reason. Like most of us when we set our hearts on a thin::, her eagerness fed on itself, and grew and gathered unnatural spasmodic strength and power as she approached her goal. Her single idea mastered her, tyrannised over her, broke her with its violence.

And Fred Hopkins, frho had not the remotest suspicion of her object, who was more easily blinded than, a child or a dog, began to; complain of her to himself as a fearfully tiresome hobbyriding, trampling onward, quaintly ugly aptaaon; . well intentioned, certainly,' bh 1 very well intentioned ; but getting more and thore of an intolerable bore every day. At last* liauderdale put up her packet of views, wonderfully well done, as if something of the fire and the devotion of their mptive had entered into them, sent themroif to their destination, gave a long sighof relief, and let her arms fall by her side in,utter weariness. The next day’she kept the house, submitting to take<a and .hung over the fire, the lighting and the piling up of which: Mr Hopkins had presided over as aproteclion against the autumn cold, in damp, draughty old St. Boyille’s House Two days afterwards she took to bed. Her cough was so . bad, and shook her so, that it paipeiand sickened her when she moved ’'about; but she would not hear of. calling in a doctor. She was quite able *to be eager about post-time—whether it had brought some remittance for her, and was interested, in -ascertaining how the others-were getting on in the glass house o'#* 1 ,4 r.«njpj,nipg Gregory ttr-bear ;wilh Mr, Hopkins’s infirmities, and 1 to initiate him as far as possible photogr^^y i tr-^;tf l #;fe r Qg or y ; thought, that there was not much the matter with her, and, assured his easy fellow workman thatrsuch was .lhe case when he inquired: for-his' friend. . m (To he conimned.)

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810407.2.12

Bibliographic details

A TIGER LILY:, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 313, 7 April 1881

Word Count
1,692

A TIGER LILY: Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 313, 7 April 1881

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