Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE STRANDING OF THE PENGUIN.

[By Telegraph.] Blenheim, To-day. The s.s. Penguin left Picton for Wellington on Friday morning, at 2 o’clock. The night was bright and clear when the steamer left. After steaming down the harbour about six miles land showed a few yards ahead. The engines were immediately reversed, but the steamer could not bo checked, and ran on the beach. The steering gear was carried away at the same time. There was no noise or confusion, and the bump could not have been heavy, as many of the passengers thought on awakening that the boat had arrived at Wellington wharf, the engines being stopped. It was high water when the steamer went ashore. Great efforts were made to float her yesterday, but to no purpose. The steamer Torea, which left for Grove, Torea Bay, and Watamunga yesterday morning, saw the Penguin on the beach. The captain at once went to the scene of the accident, and was soon alongside. Captain Miller enquired if he could render any assistance, but Captain Malcolm said he did not require any assistance, excepting to float the boat with the next tide. In the afternoon the Torea offered to take any despatches to Picton direct. The Torea then proceeded to Grove, and from there back to Watamunga. The little steamer again went to the Penguin, and Captain Malcolm asked them to take a line and try to tow her off, it being about high water. Owing to the strong south-east wind blowing, she was unable for some little time to receive a line, hut at last one was thrown aboard, and after tugging at it some time in vain, the line broke. Captain Malcolm wished them to take another, but, owing to there being something wtong with the pump, the Torea could not take another line. The beach whore the Penguin went ashore is composed of loose gravel and sand, so that no damage can possibly he done to the steamer. There is about twelve fathoms of water, so that only her stern is aground. The purser states that there was a dense fog at the time of the accident. The steamer was expected to float early this morning. Picton, To-day.

The s.s. Hinemoa arrived at 7 o’cock this morning, but too late for the tide. She tugged for an hour without success. Another try will be made at 4 o’clock this afternoon. Captains Malcolm and Fairchild are both very sanguine that they will get her off. Later.

The Penguin got off at 1.30 p.m. No damage was done, and she will be in Wellington about 6.30 p.m.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810326.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE STRANDING OF THE PENGUIN., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 303, 26 March 1881

Word Count
436

THE STRANDING OF THE PENGUIN. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 303, 26 March 1881

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working