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ASHBURTON INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION.

President: E. G. Wright, Esq. M.H.R. ; Vice-President : H. Friedlander, Esq., J. P. Committee : Messrs J. C. Wilson, F. Pavitt, F. B. Passmore, C. Hardy, A. M‘Farlnne, A. E. Peache, St. G. Douglas, Bullock, C. P. Cox, T. R. Hoddor, C. Braddell, F. Mayo, G. Jameson, A. Harrison, H. Zander, R. W. Shearman, H. C. Jacobson, and D. Williamson, ; Treasurer : Mr 11. Eyton ; Secretary ; Mr. S. E. Poyntz. Arrival of the Governor. The train conveying his Excellency and suite arrived at Ashburton, amid hearty cheering, about S minutes to i o’clock. Innnendiately on arrival, his Excellency alighted, and was met at the triumphal arch by the members of the Borough and County Councils, Industrial Exhibition Committee, the Caledonian Society, the two former and the latter reading addresses of welcome. The Ashburton Rifle corps acted as a guard of honor, and were drawn up frosi the train to the arch, some members of fhe (Caledonian Society, and the police, and die Fife Brigade forming a passage up to tire H.ajl His Excellency was accompanied by wig Hon. the Premier, Lieutenant Colonel Packe, Captain Knoliy, Aid-de-Camp, apd Captain Dundas, C.Y.C. The Mayor then stepped forward and welcomed his Excellency as follows :—lt is with the highest degree of pleasure that, as Mayor of the Borough of Ashburton, I welcome you to-day, The colonists of New Zaland bear a loyal love to her Majesty th§ Queen, and rejoice in having an op.portunity to welcome amongst them a

distinguished representative of the Crown like yourself. The best proof of our loyalty that we believe we can •. give, is to diligently labor for the ad- i vancement of the land of our adoption, ' so that it may take a high place among the Colonies of the great Empire which own our Sovereign Lady as their Queen, and help to maintain her position among the nations of the earth. That position is the premier one, and it has been achieved!by the sterling qualities which characterise a people prosperous in times of peace and noble in times of war. In our time of peace we are striving to build up for our Sovereign and ourselves, as her people, a Colony that shall be the abode of prosperity and plenty. To do this, our agricultural position shows that we have taken an important and successful step. But as man cannot live by land alone, neither can a Colony so isolated as ours make itself the future home for a dense population by only one industry. The Colony is now striving to inaugurate and establish many industries, so that her well known resources may be ascertained more fully and developed, with a view of benefitting the people engaged in them. The Town and County of Ashburton desire to join in the industrial effort now being made by the Colony, and I have to thank you on behalf of my fellow townsmen for the great honor you have done us to-day, to grace with your presence and presidency the opening of our first exhibition of art and industry. By your presence here to-day you countenance and encourage the colonists of this district in their determination to cultivate such industries as it is capable of maintaining, and for such kindness let us return to you our sincere thanks. I have the honor to present your Excellency with an address of welcome from the Borough of Ashburton, which is expressive of the welcome they give you, and of the appreciation of the high honor you have done them in kindly consenting to open the Ashburton Industrial Exhibition. (Cheers). The Town Clerk then read the following address Ashburton, March 24th ( 1881.—To his Excellency the Hon. Arthur Hamilton Gordon, G.C.M.G., her Majesty’s High Commissioner for the Western Pacific Government, and Commander-in-Chicf in and over her Majesty’s Colony of New Zealand, and also its dependencies,*and • Yice-Admiral of the same

May it please your Excellency,—We, the Mayor and Councillors of the Borough of Ashburton, desire to tender to your Excellency, on behalf of ourselves and our follow-townsmen, our heartiest welcome on the occasion of what is to us and to this district an important visit. Your Excellency, in coming to Ashburton today, has been pleased to confer upon us a high favor, and we desire to express to your Excellency our warm gratitude for your Excellency’s kindness. We trust that your visit to this borough will impress your Excellency favorably with the progress made by the settlers in a district only five years settled, and more than fifty miles from a sea port ; and that your Excellency will recognise in their endeavor to encourage industries, a desire on the part of settlers to still further advance the mission of colonisation they have undertaken. Such an endeavor on the part of her Majesty’s subjects in this district your Excellency has been pleased to inaugurate this clay in the Industrial Exhibition you are now to open, and your Excellency’s presence on this occasion is to ns a source of the deepest gratification. We feel assured, from your Excellency’s past history as a representative of her Majesty, that your administration will be characterised by increasing efforts to advance the progress of the Colony in every direction and to add to its well-being, and we are confident that when, on a future occasion, your Excellency may be pleased to visit us, the Colony will have fully emerged from the temporary commercial depression under which every part of the world has recently suffered. We trust that tlie term of your Excellency’s administration will be fraught with blessing to yourself and to the subjects of her Majesty in the Colony, and, while we assure your Excellency of the continued loyalty of the people of this borough to our Sovereign Lady, we trust that happiness, health, and a brilliant career may characterise your life, which it is our wish may be long and pleasant, and we beg to subscribe ourselves, — Your obedient servants,

Mayor— Hugo Fkiedlander. ( Donald Williamson. 1 G. M. Robinson. | Rudolph Fribdlander, Councilllors'l W. G. St. Hill. I Alfred Harrison. j George Parkin. I T. Bullock.

C. Bkaddbll, Town Clerk. His Excellency replied—

Mr. Mayor and Gentlemen, —I am grateful to you for the cordiality of your welcome, and thank you sincerely for the kind wishes, with reference to myself, which your address contains. The progress which has been made here, during the Inst five years, is indeed remarkable, and it affords me much pleasure that the last place I shall visit on my present tour is one, the aspect of which testifies so strongly, not only to the resources of the colony, but to the energy apcl determination of its people. The Chairman of the County Council read the following address ■ — To his Excellency the Honorable Arthur Hamilton Gordon, Kinght Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, her Majesty’s High Commissioner for the Western Pacific, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in and over her Majesty’s Colony of New Zealand and its dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same :--Mayit please your Excellency—On behalf of the inhabitants of the Ashburton County Council, we bog most cordially to welcome your Excellency, on your first visit to this portion of the Colony. Wo desire to convoy to your Excellency, as her Majesty's representative, the assurance that the inhabitants of this County are animated with the deepest loyalty to her most Gracious Majesty. We feel sensible that in your Excellency the Colony possesses a Governor whose past career affords every prospect that the office which your Excellency holds will bo maintained for the true benefit of the Colony, and all classes of her Majesty’s subjects. We venture on behalf of the inhabitants of this County most respectfully to thank your Excellency for being pleased to honor with your presence the opening ceremony of the Ashburton Industrial Exhibition, and wo trust that the practical lessons in productive economy taught in to-day’s Exhibition, will result in material advancement towards greater independence of precarious markets. That your Excellency’s tenure pf office may bo gratifying to yourself and satisfactory tp the Colony, and that your Excellency U)ay, during that time, witness the great advance of the Colony in all that constitutes prosperity, is the most fervent wish of this Council. Signed on behalf of the councillors and inhabitants of the County of Ashburton, tfiis 24th day of March, 1881. W. (tX Wajukeßj fihajrm^n. f. Majnwakj.no, Olprjf,'

His Excellency replied—

Gentlemen, —I thank you for your address, and receive with much satisfaction your assurance of loyalty to the Crown, and devotion to the person of the Sovereign. It has afforded me much satisfaction to be able to be present with you to-day on so interesting an occasion as the opening of your Industrial Exhibition, and I share your hopes that the interests of this fine district may be essentially promoted by the display of its resources.

The Vice-President of the Caledonian Society read the following address :—| The Ashburton Caledonian Society hail with joy the appointment by their beloved Queen of a scion of the noble house of Gordon to be Governor of New Zealand, and the Society has unfeigned pleasure in according to your Excellency a Highland welcome as her Majesty’s representative and as a fellow-countryman. Descended from an illustrious family, noted for their wisdom in council and their bravery in the field, with hereditary attainments carefully cultivated, and with a long and varied experience as Governor over different races, we feel, in the present state of matters in this colony, that her Majesty’s choice has been an eminently wise one, and certain to impart a feeling of confidence and security throughout the country. Your Excellency is aware that the relationship between the two races inhabiting these islands has not been and i» not in a satisfactory state. That the natives .are brave and intelligent is without doubt, and they are extremely jealous of their rights and independence ; and justly so, we think. That their rights have been fully considered is open to question. A descendant of a proud and warlike race, your Excellency will naturally bo the more able to understand the feelings of the Maoris, and by your counsel and advice the difficulties that prevent a thorough and cordial understanding between the two races will, we hope, he swept away ; and instead of a legacy to our successors of bitter hatred and deadly feud, a feeling of friendship, amity, and a co-relation of interests shall join the two people as one, obeying the same laws and respecting the constituted authorities of the land. Such a result we think worthy of the ambition of the highest intellect. That your Excellency may be spared to accompish such an object is the earnest desire of the Ashburton Caledonian Society. Signed on behalf of the Society by F. Macbean Stewart, Vice-President.

His Excellency said he thanked the members of the Caledonian Society most cordially for the warmth of their address to him. It would ill become him did he, after the receipt of such, reply thereto in the formal and measured tones of an official reply. He thanked them for their expressions of loyalty to the Crown, but those were sentiments which he found were shared by the whole of the population, and their respect to her Majesty was proven in every part of the Colony. He had also to thank them for their more personal wishes and remarks as effecting himself. It was reported of Lord Dufferin, Governor-General of Canada, that when leaving that country he said he had only one fault to find with his successor, and that was that he was not an Irishman. (Laughter.) He could quite understand the feelings experienced by Lord Dufferin, and was aware that kindred and country ties in the breasts of Irishmen were strong, and that the possession of similar sympathies on the part of their rulers endeared them to the people. Nevertheless, he hoped that, because he belonged to the north of the Tweed, the respect would not be the less.

They had done him the honor to allude to the great house to which he belonged, and he believed that his desire to do his duty as a member thereof would prove a great incentive in the guidance of his actions, and he attributed all his success in life up to the, present to his having followed the guidance of his father. He regarded self-government as the privilege of the people, and not a boon. It was the r people’s right. He should make it a point to follow the guidance of his Ministerial advisers in native and other matters, more especially the former, only so long as they had the confidence of the people. The conclusion of his Excellency’s remarks was the signal for prolonged cheering.

The Opening Ceremony. As the Governor entered the Exhibition Building the National Anthem was performed by four ladies—viz., Mrs Wood, Miss Kidd, and Miss Pavitt at the pianos, and Miss Hodder at the organ; Mr H. J. Weeks, conductor. The effect, as may be imagined, was excellent, from the capital tone which the instruments produced, and the excellent time and expression, was indeed very flattering to these performers. The toning of the instruments and the arrangement of the music was left ip the hands of Mr Weeks. His Excellency then went round and examined the various exhibits, after which the following address was read by Mr Wright, M-H.R., President, who was acconppanied op tire stage by His Excellency, and suite. IVjir E. Wakefield, M.H.R., Commissioner appointed by the Government, thg Mon. Colonel Brett, Colonel Paeke, and members of the Exhibition Committee,

After a few minutes, the ladies were admitted to the gallery, but the crush added, with the great heat, made it anything but pleasant for them. Some discomfort was also felt by some visitors who held opening tickets, as they had to stand out in the broiling sun, and were not allowed to enter for some time—the Committee thinking that there would not be sufficient room in the Hall.

The following address was read ; To His Excellency the Honorable Arthur Hamilton Gordon, Knight Grand Cross of the most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Her Majesty’s High Commissioner for the Western Pacific, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in and over Her Majesty’s Colony of New Zealand and its Dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same. Your Excellency—The members of the Ashburton Local Industries Association desire to thank you for your kindness in consenting to preside at the opening of their first Exhibition . This collection of works of art, manufactures, and raw produce is the result of the labours of a few zealous gentlemen, who desired to bring under the notice of the public some tokens of the valuable resourses and capabilities of this district. They were incited thereto by a keen sense of the importance of developing, in this colony, as many othet fields of employment as possible, in addition to the agricultural, pastoral, and mining industries, both as a means of contributing to the natural prosperity,. and also as a means of furnishing congenial employment to those who, from any cause

whatever, may fail to find profitable occupation in mining or agriculture, or other kindred works requiring great physical endurance. Your Excellency will he pleased to learn that the invitation for exhibits has been so heartily responded to, that there are upwards of five hundred entries. The exhibits of purely local production, though not very numerous on this occasion, are nevertheless important, including as they do, grain, of which this county exported last year upwards of 50,000 tons of the value of L 350,000 sterling. The wool grown in the county may be estimated at an annual value of LIIO,OOO, and it is anticipated that within the next twelve months active measures will be taken to establish a manufactory for the production of beet-root sugar. Enquiries are being prosecuted with that object, and the importance of the industry has been forcibly represented by Sir Julius Vogel in his despatches to the Government. Samples of the sugar-beet have been grown in the neighbourhood, and both soil and climate are favorable to its production in large quantities. The modest anticipations of the promoters has been more than realised, and the public interest manifested in the work appealed such as to warrant the Committee in seeking Your Excellency’s support to a movement which, it is hoped, will conduce somewhat to the prosperity and happiness of Her Majesty’s subjects in these {.arts. We hope that Your Excellency’s sojourn in New Zealand may be a source of happiness to yourself, and marked by a large development of those resources with which this colony is so bountifully endowed. We have the honor to be Your Excellency’s most obedient servants, The Committee. His Excellency said—

Gentlemen —I thank you for your address, and for your kindly welcome. It has afforded much satisfaction to conclude my present tour by formally opening this interesting Exhibition. The display of products exhibited, speaks highly for the zeal and perserverance of those by whom it has been promoted, as well as for the value of the resources, the existence of which it manifests. lam gratified to learn that your efforts have been justly appreciated by the public, as they certainly are by myself; and I trust that your hopes as to the advantage to be derived from them may be more than fully realised. At.the request of Mr Wright, M.H. R., his Excellency then declared the Exhibition open to the public, and the proceedings terminated with the singing of the National Anthem by the public assembled. The musical selections during the afernoon were given by Mrs Wood and the Misses Hodder, Kidd, Pavitt, and L. Fookes, and they must be congratulated on their rendering of some reallly excellent music. We must not forget to mention that the triumphal arch is a most elaborate one, and Mr St. Hill deserves the highest praise for his artistic design and the excellent way in which it was decorated with flags and evergreens. The Luncheon. His Excellency was subsequently entertained at luncheon, the necessary arrangements having been prepared in a marquee adjoining the Exhibition building, and carried out in a very satisfactory manner by host Shearman of the Somerset Hotel. About sixty other gentlemen were present, his Excellency being supported on the light by E. G. Wright, Esq., M.H.R., and on the left by E. Wakefield, Esq., M.H.R. Refreshment having been partaken off, Mr Wright proposed the health of the Queen, and followed this by proposing that of the Prince of Wales and the Royal Family. He referred to the Irish land troubles, Nihilistic, and Socialistic disturbances now prevailing in Europe, and said it behoved the crowned heads of the world to look well to their seats. He trusted the Prince of Wales on his succession to the throne of England which Heaven grant might be far distant —would follow the example set him by Her Majesty! (Applause). Mr Wright then said that, as the time at the disposal of their guest was brief, it devolved upon him to propose his health. He thought he should not be incorrect in calling them members of the working community, and he was certain they would all appreciate the industry which their visitor had displayed in making himself acquainted with the agricultural and other districts in the Colony over which he had been appointed Governor. They were well aware that in no other way could he have arrived at any estimate of the amount of work which had been done, he might say, by a handful of settlers. Ho called them a handful of settlers because the total population of the colony was but little in advance of the number of persons who, during last year, poured into America from all parts of the world. Sir Arthur Gordon had governed a good many of the colonies under the sway of the British Crown, and although New Zealand had to give way to nearly all on the score of population, yet he believed he was not wrong in saying it need not do so on the point of the brightness of its future. It was not too much to say when ho asserted that few places had brighter prospects. (Applause.) He thought the Governor would experience a thrill of joy when it came before him tl;at' ho had helped to fill one page in the jqatter of advancement. In one particular his Excellency had fallen on a particularly happy time. He alluded to the native difficulty, which had qccupied the minds of all for some iqonths past. Fortunately this difficulty had been overcome, and the promises of the Government were being carried out to tlie letter, ife believed he interpreted tlja feeiing of all present on tl;e native question when he said let justice be dealt out to the 40,000 or 50,000 natives, the remnant of their race. The toast was drunk with enthusiasm. His Excellency said, during the few hours he had been in the town, he had seen nothingbutthatwhioh badgxcited his admiration, and heard nothing but that which had given him satisfaction. He had only one complaint to make, and that was that lie had been told previous to coming hero that he was to stay two hours and make four speeches. Nothing was said of a fifth. Now they would probably learn in the course of time that of the many things he did badly, that which he did the worst of all was the making of an after dinner speech. They would, therefore, excuse him if he made his reply as brief as possible. He thanked them iieartily for the kind manner in which they had drunk his health, and in conclusion, expressed the surprise he had experienced at the magnitude, considering the age of the town, of their Exhibition. In conclusion, he begged to propose “ The success of the Ashburton Industrial Exhibition, coupled with that of the district. ”

Mr Wright briefly returned thanks, and then begged excuses of the company for His Excellency, whose stay in town was limited to half an hour, and who he stated desired injthe meantime to drive round the town.

The Exhibition. It is, and always has been, 1 a recognised fact that, in the cases of young ' colohites} the fostering of local industries is the one most essential point to be kept in the mind’s eye of the settlers therein. The

place that possesses good agricultural resources is certain to prove attractive to the artisan,’as well as the farmer, and to ensure the retention of the former as a resident therein, it rests with the latter to encourage them in their efforts to meet the demands of the local market, and thus' ensure the well being of the community. It is possible, indeed, we may say, certain, that the locally manufactured articles will not, in the first instance, equal that impoited, In quality, or be able to compete with it in price ; but the difference, which will not be so great, is attributable , to the circumstances in which the manufacturer finds himself placed. Increase, however, the number of his orders,' and let him but bear in mind the -mazier-of “ Small profits and quick returns,”- and the majority of these difficulties are swept out of his path. Possibly, even in this event, his prices will i still be slightly in advance of the imported article-; but - should this be taken into question 1 We argue not, and feel certain eveiy well wisher of the colony will side with us., But not alone with the settlers in the colony does it rest On the, Government devolves a most important doty in the matter of Protection, and, up to the pre-: ‘ sent, New Zealand cannot complain, of the action of its legislators in this respect. By the infliction of customs duties, they have hitherto placed the imported article, ', commercially speaking, on an equal footing with that locally manufactured, and it is the fault of the manufacture* if'this local article does not attract attention and support at the hands of their fellow colonists. The master. spirit of the’ age is competition, and is always productive of improved workmanship ; thsrefore it is J easily to be perceived the great gain to he derived by all classes by the introduction of a spirit of emulation amongst our oolonial industries. Such inauguration cannot but tend to advance the intereat;of any industrious community ; therefore: none will deny it when we assert that-to-the promoters of the Ashburton Industrial Exhibition, 1881, opened to day f by his Excellency the Governor,. atA*'duo‘ the* thanks, not only of the residents in till Ashburton district,but of every well-wishci of of the colony. The conception of (saw an idea was not difficult- of attainment, but what decidedly was, was the carrying out thereof, and the surmounting of thd prejudice of the public against the feas* ability of the scheme. Few persons a~o to run the gauntlet of public ridicule, which would certainly have been the tion of the gentlemen above mentioned had they failed in their endeavors. Nothing daunted, howevpr, they haye by their united efforts enabled Ashburton to far outstrip her elder sister townships in this race for advancement; they' have fought the good fight, and their’s alone is the victory and praise. . ■ . ! i Admission is gained by the side entrance to the Hall nearest Shearman’s hotel, and the passage leading thereto from the thoroughfare has been most tastefully decorated with evergreens aUjd foliage. In the passage leading to the main hall are exhibited, by Mr Aitken, a book of oil paintings on New Zealand subjects, deserving of more than a passing notice, the subjects being most faithfully delineated, specimens of lithographic work, in all its grades, from the ’ Lyttelton Times office, the subjects; of the 1 exhibits being the Award Certificates;■ Mr J. Mac Lean Dunn exhibits a part of the first parchment made at Neltod,'. foe which a first award has been made. A similar honor has been conferred in an extra exhibit in the same class by Mr ‘ Smith, on behalf of Mr Collier of Nelson, | the manufacturer. A specimen of litho-

graphy is exhibited by C. Roadley, the subject being the photographs their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales, : t ihe date of marriage. _ The Lyttelton Times, however, carries off first award with an exhibit of photo-litho work and chromo-lithography. The Press Co. exhibit some splendid specimens of letterpresswork, and the same remark applies to those entered by the Timaru Herald and R. W. Cuming of Dunedin. Samples of litho work, including stones with designs thereon, &c., are shewn by \ ictor Clark, and of engraving, by Wolf, Ford, and Co., Christchurch. To the right are an ancient English bible, the typography of which contrasts strongly with the exhibits just mentioned ; a copy of Gil Bias, and illustrations of the anatomy of the Bee. A model of the local chicory works, with specimens of the chicory plant in ds various stages, are of an interesting character. We now enter the main building. In this, there are four central stalls or tables, and that which first calls for attention is occupied by specimens of pot plants exhibited by Messis Sealey Bros; collections of c'n I ’octicncry which would tempt the m-w fastidious of tastes, whilst bad such a dUp ay been placed before us in our yout ful days we could not, we believe, haw resisted the temptation. Mr A. Thiel has succeeded in obtaining the first av. d, iis exhibits being most tasty in s e an<i excellent in finality. Messrs Ai!. i (Ashburton) and Christie (Christchur. ■•.) take second honors, the former with a cascade of fancy goods, and the latter a display of sweets. Mr Bruce exhibits four architrave mouldings, whilst in close proximity is a drawing of a design for a coasting steamer for the New Zealand trade, emanating from the Canterbury Foundry. Two collections of ferns made by Messrs Zouch and Billens, and a number of ornamental plants exhibited by Mr G. T. Smith, attract the attention of horticulturists. Mr Almao, of hat fame, has also a number of various designs in hats, to which a first award has been made. A large doll, in glass case, is the centre of attraction for the little lady visitors. The second table is devoted exclusively to leatherware, the first exhibit claiming attention being that entered by Messrs Toomer Bros., containing boots of all sizes, shapes, and qualities, whilst the designs in pegging on the soles of some of the samples greatly enhance their appearance and finish. The whole of the boots contained in the case are factory made. Tn the next case are exhibited some splendid specimens of hand sewn work from the hands of Mr T. Chambers, whilst further on, are samples from Messrs Lightband, Allan and Co.’s factory. The two latter receive second awards of merit, and the judges can have had no little difficulty in arriving at their decision, so excellent are the whole of the exhibits submitted. A second order of merit is awarded to James Farquhar for his exhibit of leather gloves and leggings. Table No. 3 is occupied exclusively with samples of woollen manufacture from the Eoslyn Company s factory. The tweeds and serges are of splendid quality, and reflect the greatest credit on the manufacturers. The same remark applies to the exhibit of tweeds, yarns, blanketting, etc., from the Kaiapoi Woollen Factory, occupying the next table, and each of which were entered byMessrs. Orr and Co. The left band side of the ball is devoted to sewing machinery of various manufactures, the entries ranging from the Singer to the latest novelty in this department, viz., the Davis \ erti- , cal Feed machine. There is also a very fine display of medals gained by the Singer Sewing Machine Company, exhibited at the far end of the hall. Underneath ti e gallery has been devoted to furniture, and the suites here exhibited reflect tbebighest possible credit on New Zealand manufacturers. Mr A. J. White, of Christchurch, secures first awards with a splendid suite of bedroom furniture in maple, an extra exhibit, a black and gold cabinet, and other sundries too numerous to particularise ; whilst Mr John Meech’s exhibit is awarded second honor, a gold enammelled window cornice being a special feature thereof. Mr W. Davis, of this town, also shares first honors with Mr ■White, his exhibit, consisting of a suite of bedroom furniture, being fully deserving of the award. Passing up the hall to the right, is a specimen of tailoring in the form of an Ulster manufactured from Kaiapoi tweed, and the appearance of •which is so comforting as to almost cause the beholder to wish winter were here, and thus justify an outlay in this direction. Next this is an extra exhibit in the form of an automatic action cabinet, entered by Mr A. Gates, A most interesting item is a lathe, and specimens of turnery in bone and wood, by Mr Graham, of Lyttelton. The minuteness of many of the articles is also a matter of interest. A special feature is an illustration in wood work of the various stages through which a piece of ivory passes during its transfiguration from a piece of elephant tusk into a billiard ball. The other articles include puzzles, teetotums, shell yard-measures, Ac. The sides of the building are tastefully hung with oil and water-color paintings, steel plate engravings, photographs, &c. On the table at the foot of the stage is a collection of permanent photographs, executed in Carbon on opal and china, by Mr. P. Schourup, of Colombo street, Christchurch. To these have been awarded a certificate of the first order of merit. Next to these come some splendid specimens of needlework in gold and silver ; of ancient literature ; silver ornaments constructed from coins of the reign of George the IV ; two marble clocks exhibited by Mr Gavin, and ' accompanied by a collection of foreign jewellery ; and several clocks manufactured by Mr R. Murray, of this town, of unique design, and to which a first-class certificate*

has been awarded ; the same exhibitor has also entered specimens of rough diamonds and other uncut stones, and of clockwork in progress as it leaves the moulder or blacksmith’s hands till complete. 'Next this is Mr A. Blyth’s exhibit oi silversmiths’ work mentioned by us in our issue of last evening. A minature plough and model of a horse hoe, the former by J. 11. Steele and the latter by J. Stevens, with a collection of silk cocoons and specimens of wood turning complete the exhibits at this table. On the stage are the musical instruments and a suite of drawing-room furniture, the former, including an American organ and a cottage piano, exhibited by Milner and Thompson, and to which first awards have been made, and the latter by W. S. King of Christchurch. Suspended from the Hats is a gasalier manufactured by S. Hardley, of this town, and fully deserving of the highest praise. In the room to the right of the stage arc specimens of Venetian blind manufacture, and a model of a I'evolving shutter, by Taylor ; a table constructed of Now Zoawoods, the inlaying of which cannot fail to attract admiration ; two elegant walking sticks, hand carved, a wool winder, manufactured by a local resident ; model of a vessel; several specimens of wood work by E, Jewell, of Christchurch ; and last, but certainly not least, a workbox constructed of New Zealand woods, and in the inlaying of which over throe thousand five hundred different pieces of wood have been used. The lid bears the words “New Zealand, 1880,” inlaid in various woods. The first tent one enters after leaving the Hall, is devoted to the agricultural machinery, buggies, ironware, etc , etc. Turning to the left one is confronted by specimens in wire work by Mr Fiddess, of Timaru, and for which a second order of merit award has been given. Cooking ranges and lire stoves are exhibited by five different makers, first awards being given to Messrs Scott Eros., E. Eeece, J. Compton, and Hern. A duplex chaff cutter and oat crusher combined, is entered by Messrs Hudson, Ridley, and Co., and of the churns, Davis’ patent swing churn, and Hathaway’s barrel churn are most worthy of notice. Mr Booth exhibits a patent washing machine, a cheese vat, and curd mill, and a sack of cattle condiment. Next these are a collection of dairy implements, and an Empire washing machine. In agricultural machinery, Messrs P. and D. Duncan submit a double-furrow lever plough, and this being the only one entered, it receives the first award. King Bros, exhibit a village fire engine, capable of throwing a five-inch stream 120 feet, and built to enable it to turn in its own length ; a rotary hand force-pump ; Excelsior horizontal double acting pump ; and several other pumps, to all of which are awarded first order of merit certificates. The number of entries for cereals were very good ; Messrs Friedland Bros, exhibiting fifteen specimens, and receiving seven first awards, and five second, three of the samples submitted being unnoticed by the judges. An extra exhibit of seeds, including rye, white runner beans, broad beans, etc., by John Carter, was also awarded first honors. Of the other exhibitors, in wheat, Messrs AULeary Bros., J. Jameson, and J. S Bruce secured first awards, likewise a similar award to the latter exhibitor for a specimen of Egyptian mummy wheat, amost peculiarly shaped grain, and bearing in taste great similitude to rice. Two samples of golden and grey tares received first and second awards respectively. Messrs Jameson and Roberts exhibited two samples of boric dust, and Mr Cambridge one of locally grown and ground linseed meal ; there being no awards in the former, but a first certificate in the last mentioned. For samples of pearl barley, flour, and oatmeal, Mr Bruce, of the Waitangi sawmills, carried off two second certificates, the first in barley being taken by E. H. Banks and Co., Christchurch, with an excellent sample. In cheeses there arc three competitors, the palm being carried off by Mr A. Hayman, with Mr G. Gilmour second. A first award is made to Mr J. Jackson for his exhibit of potato farina, and a similar honor is conferred on Cheaver’s gold medal filter, the efficacy of which is tested by the visitor. There are four entries in the leather class, hut these are all made by Mr Redfern, of Tinwald, and he receives Ist certificate for his samples of black basils. In timber Mr J. S. Bruce exhibited two specimens of broadleaf or ribbon wood, the face being polished, and the other left in its natural state, and a piece of inatai or black pine showing the borings of the weta-weta. Mr J. Lemon exhibited specimens of mangolds grown by him, and in close proximity are samples of beetroot Try Mr Hunt ; sugar beet, by Mr Anderson, and of treacle, extracted therefrom, mamifactui’ed by Mr A. Thiele. First awards arc given to the first, second and fourth, respectively, a second-class certificate being awarded to the sugar beet samples. We now come to an item of more than usual interest. We refer to the flexible harrow exhibited by Messrs Haxton and Beattie, of Gore, and for which first prizes were awarded in Invercargill, Mataura, and Taieri. The claims this has upon the notice of the agriculturist will be understood when we state that the same is made without nut or screw, is reducible to any size within a few moments, and, being flexible, runs no risk of getting broken when employed over rough ground. Messrs Haxton and Beattie have by their invention supplied a long felt want on the part of farmers, for in the event of any particular tooth in the old specimens l getting broken, the whole harrow needed to be conveyed to the blacksmith before a repair could be effected. This, however, is obviated in the present instance. Each tooth is so formed that it shackles into another, and the system of locking is so simple that a school-boy could either take to pieces or put one of these harrows together in a very short space of time.

Not onty has it for its recommendation the portableness of the whole concern, but it can, by being reversed, be converted into a chain harrow. The judges have awarded a first-class certificate to the exhibitors, who are protected by letters patent. Messrs Andrews and Bevan receive a second award for their model of a straw elevator. An ingenious machine for lighting gas lamps in windy weather and a corking machine receive first awards. Mr Stephens, locally known, exhibits specimens of horse shoes manufactured by himself. In the cutlery and electro-plated and silver ware, which next comes under notice, Mr E. Recce is the principal exhibitor, receiving first awards for some splendid wares. Messrs Orr and Co. exhibit the necessities of a sportsman, including fowling pieces, rifles, powder flask, cartridge moulds, Ac., specially manufactured to their order. In the saddlery competition between imported English manufactured goods and local productions competition was very keen. Mr J. Carter’s exhibit of a Whitmore saddle and stirrups receives an award of the first merit, as does .also Mr Tait’s collection of English and colonial saddlery. Of carriage and wheelwright’s work there is a display which could not but meet the approbation of even the most fastidious. Mr Howland exhibits a double-seated buggy “ Howland ” style, and a dog-cart,

receiving for the former a first award. Moore and Son also share first honors with an Abbot patern single buggy, and second awards with an English pattern dog-cart and a double-seated Victorian buggy. Messrs Baker and Brown and Air J. R. Ghmville secure second honors with a double-seated buggy and a substantially built waggonette respectively. Of Messrs Doan Bros.’, tin and brass workers, Lichfield street, the collecton of articles prepared by that firm for this exhibition is not only a highly creditable one, on account of the superior make and finish of the objects composing it, bat is also of great interest as showing the. facilities that exist in Christchurch for manufacturing articles which it is com monly supposed can be obtained only bv importation from other countries. Decidedly the most important, though perhaps not the most conspicuous item in the collection, is an assortment of metal buttons, such as arc commonly used in the manufacture of men’s clothing. I hose arc of two materials, brass and tin, the latter being plain, lacquered, and gilt. They may safely be pronounced equal m every respect to the imported buttons, and can bo produced at a very cheap i ate. Wc were informed that the Messrs Dean are preparing appliances by which they will very shortly be enabled to manufacture metal buttons of almost, every description, cither plain, ornamental, or cloth covered. Among tho othci articles worthy of notice may be remarked a brass urn for containing coflee and hot vatci. ns urn is placed on a moveable base of perforated brass, so that it can be removed from the stand if required, to be heated over a stove or lamp. Another conspicuous object is a very pretty bird cage, iu the form of a 1 house, made oi wire, with roof of tin perforated in a> tasteful pattern. There is also a toilet set, in Japan enamelled tinware, ot a French grey color, ornamented with brightly coloured floral devices. A number of flower pots, of similar material, are particularly noticeable for their handsome ornamentation, consisting ot bouquets of flowers. A n .uvel exhibit is a sot of small waiters or salvers, which are adorned with wide borders of crystalised japanning, m various tints, while the centres are occupied with handsome floral devices in brilliant colors. As showing the extent of the appliances at the command ot the makers, it may bo stated that these pretty articles can be made so cheaply that they could be sold retail at less than a shilling each. Another noticeable object is a neat cash-box, coated with crystallized japan, and ornamented with a gilt border. Taken altogether, the exhibits arc veiy o-oed. A very interesting item is a col action of tins for containing jam, presen cd fruit or meat. These are fitted a movable lid, of somewhat smaller diameter than the top of the tin, the space between the opening tor the lid and the outer rim of the canister being occupied by a deep groove, winch, after the tin is filled and the lid fitted on, can be filled with plaster of Pans, or melted wax, so as to hermetically seal the

canister without injuring the lid, or spoiling the tin, which can therefore be used over again after the contents have been extracted. Besides the above, there arc a number of specimens of stamped work in iron and tin, the most prominent of which are some small tin hinges, such as are used to fix the lids of teapots and for other purposes. These latter are placed side by side with some imported hinges of similar character, and the result of the contrast is greatly in favor of the local .article, both for durability and neatness. Mr Joseph PHydo, Ashburton, exhibited a very well constructed bath. It is made so that it will all close in and form a table or dresser. The outside lid is wood, as are also the sides. In the centre of the bath can be fixed a wasbstaml and basin, and at one end a shower bath, with all the necessary appurtenances, curtains, etc., so that it is a most complete and useful article for any house where a batli can be fixed in any of the rooms. The very moderate price which Mr Hyde asks for the bath complete, must cause a good demand for such a useful article. Some portable coppers were also shown by the same exhibitor, and deserve more than a passing notice, both from the superiority of their construction, and the reisonablg price at which they are sold by him. Mr

Hardley, another local exhibitor, showed some very good specimens of. spouting and ridging, capital specimens of tinware generally used in households, and one gasolicr. The latter article has been made by this exhibitor for several of our public buildings, churches, Ac., and owing to their good design, are found extremely popular. Some tin biscuit cutters, and a tin fiddle, made by Air Billens, of Christchurch, call for special mention. Air Piper, another Christchurch exhibitor, .showed some excellent samples of household and other tinware, which was japanned, also sonic galvanised iron, articles of various kinds, .and the general excellence of these manufactures was frequently commented upon. A corking machine and capsule machine, exhibited by Air J. C. Dolman, a local plumber, were also good specimens of work, speaking volumes for the energy displayed by our local tradesmen iu this kind of industry. A first-class certificate is awarded Alcssrs Scott Bros, for their exhibit <if an iion garden chair, the design of which is most appropriate, consisting of fe’.u haf casting, with rustic boundaries. In the passage giving access to the tent set aside f< r pottery, beer, wines, cordials, monumental masonry. Ac.. is exhibited by T. W ilson, Christchurch, specimens of woollen mats of various colors, dressed by the exhibitor and to which an awaid of the highest merit has been made. On Messrs .Schwartz Bn's, exhibit of samples of New Zealand wines. Alcssrs Wood and Co., of locally manufactured boor in bulk, and Echersby and AlacFarla.no, extra exhibits of bottled beer, similar honors are conferred, the articles exhibited being well worthy of the distinction. Second honors are obtained by Alcssrs Alanning and Co., for bottled beer. Little's sheep dip in various sized cans is exhibited, but no award bad been made at. the lime our reporter visited the tent. Near at hand aie modelled beeswax specimens entered by Airs Williamson. Winslow, and to which a first-class certificate has been given. Air Quill exhibits a jeroboani of claret of I87(i vintage, flanked on either sides by bottles of champagne, the manner in which those arc corked and scaled, prove an eyesore to the connoisseur. Air Britton obtains pride of place for samples of mixed cordials, whilst similar awards arc made to exhibits of soap manufactured at Lcoston, exhibited by Alcssrs Hodder and Co., candles from Qanifo’s Rakaia factory, porter-malt, and Nelson hops, by Wood and Co., and malt, by Alanning and Co. Near at hand is a candle making machine, worthy of the attention of housewives. Next under notice is J. Sheriffs specimens of monumental masonry, including three marble table tops, a marble mantlepiece, and models of monuments in marble. All these display signs of that necessary care requisite in the turning out of first-class articles, and fully deserve the award (Ist class) conferred thereon. Mrs Stocks, of Christchurch, also exhibits a marble chimney piece, which meets with similar favor in the eyes of the judges. Some specimens of pottery manufactured at Malvern receive an award of the second order of merit, hut are worthy of no more than a passing

1 • ice, as the exhibits in this class are anything but A.l. A novelty in the shape of a castor oil plant is exhibited, and attracted a good deal of attention. Of the five samples of undressed flax, two receive first awards, and two second ; the former to Mr R. Marshall and the latter to Mr 0. Braddel, the former exhibitor also receiving first honors for dressed flax. H. Friedlander’s samples of confederate tobacco present a most tempting appearance, and would almost tempt the anti-smoker to forego his prejudice to the “ noxious weedbut these specimens were American grown. Judge, therefore, the pleasure experienced by advocates of tobacco growing as a New Zealand industry on perceivingthe next exhibit to be a tobacco plant in full growth, the result, we doubt not, of assiduous attention on the part of Mr Braddell, who also exhibited cakes of smokers’ joy prepared from the plant. Truly the awards received in these instances were well earned. James Seed, of Rangiora, Hayman Bros., and Hale and Forbes, for exhibits in rope cordage and twine, are awarded first-class certificates, the competitors in this class numbering nine. A second award is obtained by a group of ribbon-wood basket ware, entered by Mr J. and J. Price, of Mount Somers ; whilst next under notice is the latest instituted colonial industry, viz., pipes made from

New Zealand clay in Otago, and to which a similar recognition of merit is made. Harbutt and Co.’s brushware has hitherto held pre-eminence in the colonial market, and in this instance they add still further laurels to their fame by carrying off the first award in this class. A sample of Nelson ink receives a second order of merit certificate. For pre-eminence in the manufacture of bone dust there are fo u i competitors, the pride of place being held by our local representative, Mr F. Mayo, his immediate attendant being Rountree, Brown and Co. For preserved meats Mill. Mein receives a second-class certificate, whilst similar success attends Messrs Carew and Co. in their exhibit of sauce. For pottery J. Tucker is the principal exhibitor, and obtains first honors. Noticeable amongst the specimens is an epergne in earthenware. This concludes the exhibits in this tent, and passing into the next and final one, we come upon specimens of coal, stone, brick masonry, drain pipes, ashplialting, Ac. Of these the successful competitors are as follows. Springfield colliery, coal and fireclay, by J. 801 l ; drain pipes, by J. lacker, Mount Somers ; stone, by V'. Groves : .ashplialting specimens, by J. Bradley ; samples of Brockley coal, Gi’oy loiunnci coal, by Lloyd and Co., to which awards of the first order of merit have been made. Second awards have been conferred on exhibits of drain pipes made of cement by a Waimatc manufacturer, of Mount Somers coal, Mount Hutt coal, locally manufactured pitch, Auckland hydiaulic cement, and a collection of minerals and ores. Wc now retrace our steps, and enter the gallery of the main building. Proceeding upstairs, we entered the first room of the Town Hall, where a large collection of all kinds of articles aie cxbibited, which arc of more or less value. The first things which catch the eye of the visitor are the oil and water color paintings. Their varieties are great, but in point of excellence, many may bo considered any thing but works of art. Iheie ure some excellent landscapes, which deserve more than a passing notice. Mr Edwin Clark, of the Rakaia, exhibited a very nice moonlight sea scone, the coloring being very rich. Three other views by the Jsame exhibitor deserve to be mentioned, especially that of Lake Hawera. Air C. Bonrke, a local artist, also contributes five pictures, but the coloring was too bright and overdone. \N e are sorry that he did not exhibit the painting that was done for the stage of the Hail. Perhaps it would not he too late to do so now. Mr F. B. Standish exhibited a very nice view of Lake Polieura. Mr A. Cambridge also exhibited some very well executed portraits, that of Air E. G. Wright being a particularly good likenessof that gentleman, borne very nice paintings were sent in by Mr J obn Gibb, that of “ Little River, at the head of Lake Forsyth,” being very much admired. The other painting by the same artist in the room was particularly good. The ‘ Portrait from life,” by Mr M. Gibb was also a very artistic picture, and did great credit to the exhibitor. Mr Peele, a well known artist, exhibited a very fair painting of Akaroa Harbor. The artist’s well known skill was here shown to advantage.

A view of (Jtira Gorge, exhibited by Mr E. G. Wright, of Windemere, and painted by Mr S. Gibbs, was very much admired. Two other paintings by the same artist, also shown by Mr Wright, were well worthy of notice. Quite a large collection of views were sent in by Mr A. Stott, of Ashburton, some of which were very creditable to the artist—the “ Water of Leith,” being about the best. The exhibits of Mrs Stott were also very fair paintings, that of Moeraki Heads being certainty the best. In the water color collection, Mrs Amy Ilomorsham, exhibited some very fair pictures indeed. Miss M. Fitzgerald, Mrs Stott, and Mr Rich also exhibiting some fairly executed pictures. A little exhibitor whose name did not appear on the catalogue, also entered five water color paintings, and two crayons. The little artist’s name is Amelia George, of Christchurch, and is only 13 years of age, and the shading and coloring was remarkable for one so young. In pencil drawings, there was not a large display. Mr. G. Boyle’s copy of “ Cherry ripe ” was very natural, also a sketch of that interesting spot Methven, by Mr W. P. Claridge. In the class, for crayons and etchings, the exhibits are hung at the back of the gallary. Three very .'nice crayons, drawn by Mr A Harrison, being particularly noticeable. The views of Wangapeka valley and of Mount Arthur from Batten vallejq by C. A. Muntz, of Nelson, also deserve to bo noticed. The lace, embroidery, and trimmings were, on the whole, a very excellent assortment; Mr Wood, of Dunedin, exhibiting a very fine silk apron and two embroidered velvet smoking caps. Some very nice lace work and tatting by Miss Treloavcn and Miss Pavitt, some Maltese lace by Mrs Wood and Miss Rolls were much admired. An embroidered mantelpiece and bracket balance by Miss Sanderson, also some other embroidered work by Miss Fitzgerald, came in for a good share of attention. Mrs J. Carter, Tinwald, exhibited a very nice piece of Maciarom lace. In the class for artificial flowers and feathers, Miss Fitzgerald exhibited two groups of very nice ones under glass shades. Mrs Farquhar exhibited a very nice collection, consisting of a feather muff, collarette, and hat. In [the class for fancy needlework there was a large collection of various kinds to be seen, many of the articles being particularly beautiful in design and execution. A wool-worked cushion by Mrs Tippits was very nicely made ; the same may he said of two stools, which were made by Miss A. Permain. A very nice and pretty patterned counterpane by Mrs. C. C. Fooks was also noticeable. A collection of antimacassars, brackets, and bookmarkers by Miss Treleaveu were very nicely made, and deserve notice. Some crochet work and two cotton picture frames by Mrs Curtiss were much admired, as also was Mrs Chambers’ exhibits of the same kind of work. Mrs Richards exhibited a very nice counterpane and fancy apron. A hearthrug made at the Old Men’s Home, Ashburton, showed careful manufacture. Four pairs of stockings, made’from some of the flock of Mr Tripp, at the Orari Gorge, made by Mrs Manson, were of neat design and workmanship. In the same room Mr Henry Zander exhibited a very large collection of valuable articles. He deserves the greatest praise for the excellent way in which his exhibits wove arranged and labelled. The collection of seals, monograms, postal cards, etc., and of 3,000 stamps, was an exceedingly interesting one, and must have taken some considerable time in collecting, besides the thoroughly systematic way of arrangement. His collection alone would bo of immense value to any museum. A peculiar specimen of a boar’s jaw, with double tusks, was also exhibited by Mr Zander. The animal, we believe, was killed at Pleasant Valley. A splendid collection of coins, and specimens of silver and other ores from Mexico, a very nice ornamental bracket, a hand-made Mexican shawl of beautiful texture, a large collection of shells, nicely arranged, and large number of other interesting relics, were exhibited by Mr Zander, and were much admired. Stockings, by Miss Galleu and Mrs Camithers, for Highland costume, were of such quality that a Scotchman’s heart would yearn for them. A fancy lamp mat, fancy cushion in Berlin wool work, child’s muff and petticoat, exhibited by Miss Fitzgerald, also a pincushion and watch-pocket, woiked by Miss G. Sanderson, were much admired. Two crewel stools, worked by Mrs Zouch, the pattern being cinnorarias climbing a stump of wood, were very nicety executed, as also were two pieces of fancy work for chairs made by Mrs A. H. Shury. In the leather-worked fancy articles two very nice leather frames were exhibited by Mrs Trevor, a collection of frames, brackets, and card baskets by Mrs Curtis, also two leather frames by Mrs Zouch. These ladies’ work in leather was much admired. Two corn frames, by Mrs E, Crisp, were very nicely made, but were not placed in a good position. Mr W. H. Puddicombe exhibited a very valuable collection of coins of all nations, a Japanese picture, some interesting articles used by Japanese women for smoking and in the toilet, also a largo number of peculiar weapons used by those people. The collection of coins is indeed a valuable one, and can hardly bo surpassed, we believe in the colony. Mr G. Parkin exhibited a very interesting relic, which was a tea service, said to be one hundred years old. Two Japanese pictures wore also exhibited bj. Mr Harrison. A nice collection of gold dust and samples of quality were exhibited by Mr A. H. Shiny, also a very interesting lot of coins by Mr Gecrge Jameson. The Rev. A. W. Hands, exhibited a very rare and valuable collection of old curiosities. They consisted of the following : —An oil or scent vase, from Troy, from Dr Schliemann’s excavations ; three terracotta lamps, from the Christian catacombs of

Syracuse; a heathen Greek terracotta amp ; a lachrymatory, or tear-bottle, from the catacombs, Syracuse ; a lamp from Christian catocomps in Rome ; two knives dredged out from the mud in the Thames, opposite Lambeth Palace, in London ; a dagger from the same site wrought metal boss, with figure of St. John, found in the marshes at Stone, Kent; portrait on rosewood of an English gentleman, a.d. 1750; specimen of~ old Italian bookbinding. Date, a.d., 1593 ; specimen of bookbinding—oak boards covered with pigskin, stamped with little figures of the Apostles, a.d., IG2B ; Frankfort ; coin of Attains, King of Pergamos, in Asia Minor ; date, n.e., 2,235 ; silver penny of William the Conqueror, in 10GG—1087 ; copper coin found in Sicily ; two silver denaria of the Emperor Domitan, A. D., 81—9 G ; small coin of the protectorate of Oliver Cromweli, a.d., — 1068. Rev. A. W. Hands, exhibitor, A greenstone tomahawk, a chisel, and a native implement of the same stone were exhibited by Mr Bower, Timaru. Mr John Carter exhibited a fox’s head and brushes, the jaw and backbone ofashark. Mr Shearmans bowed a very fine collection of Japan esc, Chinese, and Indian workboxes, &c. , which were much admired. The collection of ferns was indeed an excellent one. Mr C. A. C. Hardy, Rakaia, exhibited some very nice ferns, Miss Button also had forty different rarietics, which showed careful selection. Mr J. S. Bruce has a very nice collection of Middle Island ferns, which are correctly named, and that is a great advantage. Messrs George Jameson and Zander also had a nice collection, which were well placed. In the gallery Mr Passmore had a very large collection of interesting articles. They comprise two photos, of pen and ink drawing of a collection of newspaper and other documents, one Maori rat, collection of shells, Cashmere shawl, pair Indian sandals, two pairs Indian slippers, two pair of slippers, one worked in gold and one worked in leather, smoking cap, worked in gold, a pair of Korth American Indian mocassins, a vase of artificial flowers, from feathers and daggar plant, a number of ornaments made of compressed sawdust, a meter that does not register air with the water, six pieces spiral pipe—unlike any ordinary pipe, as the joint is the strongest part, a small vice, which can be fixed at any angle—fitted for objects that taper, small lathe chuck and drill, <Src., sphynx sugar basin, used by the late Duke of Brunswick; stone paper knife, inlaid with gold ; two sandalwood card cases and fans; inkstand, made from hoof of the, “Phenomenon,” that trotted seventeen miles in 53 mins. 4 secs. A water gauge, a number of useful veterinary surgical instruments.

[A further description of several of the important exhibits will appear in our next and succeeding issues, together with the award list.]

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

ASHBURTON INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 301, 24 March 1881

Word Count
10,100

ASHBURTON INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 301, 24 March 1881

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