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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1881.

TOWN EDITION., [lssued at 5 p. m. J

Borough Council. — A meeting of this body will be held in the Council Chambers this evening, at 7 o’clock.

Clean Charge Sheet.— There was no business for transaction at the Resident Magistrate’s Court this morning. Scholastic —There aro eleven candidates up for examination for the Christchurch Normal School junior scholarships. Still They Come. —Thirteen candidates presented themselves at the barristers’ and solicitors’ examination held at Christchurch to-day.

Convalescent. —We are pleased to notice that Mr Craighead, tailor, has so far recovered from his recent indisposition as to resume business again. The Maori “Parliament.” This assemblage is now in solemn conclave at Orakei, but an Auckland telegram says that no interest is excited by the debates of the sons of the soil. Volunteer Parade,. — The Ashburton Rifles, with the band, will meet at the Town Hall on Thursday next, at twelve o’clock, to form a guard of honor to his Excellency the Governor, Sir A. Gordon.

Arrest. —An old offender named Job Brown was arrested this morning, on a charge of drunken and disorderly conduct, and with using obscene language. Ho will figure at the Resident Magistrate’s Court to-morrow morning.

Fire. —On Saturday night some stacks belonging to Mr James Shaw, near Bangiura, were destroyed by fire. They were valued at LICO, and wore uninsured. The fire is supposed to be the work of an incendiary.

The Great Autumn Handicap.— The handicap for this event will be declared in Christchurch this evening. Lure up to the present has been regarded in tho light of a favorite, the knowing ones averring that she has been “ saved ” for this race.

The Weather, —The very dry weather that has been experienced throughout this County during the last two months is begining to be seriously felt by. our graziers. We hear that very little feed is now obtainable, consequently stock must suffer more or less. A good day’s rain would be a most welcome change.

The Industrial Exhibition. —Tho tide of exhibits for tho Exhibition is still on tho flow, and the Committee and indefatigable Secretary are receiving an undeniable tost, both as to their patience and unflagging energies. A number of additional cases of exhibits came to hand to-day, and the work of unpacking is now in full swing.

Important to Farmers. —lt will bo seen from an advertisement in our issue to-day that Mr Back, railway traffic manager, announces that nearly all grain arriving at Lyttelton is being stored in the railway sheds, and farmers are advised, in order to save storage charges, not to forward grain until further notice, unless consigned to a vessel in harbor.

“Eva.”—To-night the choir of the Presbyterian Church, under the leadership of Mr Savage, will perform a service of song entitled “ Eva,” in that place of worship. The performance will commence at 8 o’clock, the chair being taken by the Rev. A. M. Beattie, and the connective readings accompanying the service being I’endered by Dr Stewart. As the performers have had the piece in rehearsal for some time past, its success should be assured, and we have little doubt the attendance will be large.

Accident. —A serious accident occurred at Waterton last evening, the victim being a little girl, three years of age, named Alice Munroe, the daughter of Mr Munro, a farmer residing in that district. The child was proceeding along the road leading from her father’s house, her intention being to meet her elder sister returning from Sunday School, when a gun was fired from behind the hedge lining the road, and some of the shot struck her in the eye. The little sufferer was brought into town this morning by her parents, and attended by Dr Stewart, who is unable to give any decided expression of opinion regarding the extent of the injuries inflicted. It is not at present known who fired the shot, but the matter is being investigated.

Award Cards for the Exhibition.— Speaking of the “Certificate of Merit” forms, which are to be used in connection with the forthcoming Industrial Exhibition, the Lyttelton Times says:—“The design, which was prepared in the lithographic department of the Lyttelton Times establishment, is a highly creditable example of colonial productive skill, and the mechanical portion of the work dees full justice to the artistic excellence of the design. The colors used arc Vermillion, ultramarine, dead gold, black and white, upon a ground of pale salmon. The richly illuminated border includes four circular panels, within which are groups and views representing art, commerce, manufacture, and agriculture. The title is in bold, ornamental lettering, enriched by scroll tracery. For the second degree certificates, the same design has been used, but the rich coloring is dispensed with. It may fairly be said that those certificates have been rendered so thoroughly presentable, that recipients will preserve them with pleasure. It may be added that the certificates have been printed upon one of the more modern card surface, technically known as “dull enamelled.’ ’’

Football.—A meeting of those interested in the formation of a football club was held on Saturday evening, in Quill’s Commercial Hotel. There were about twenty gentlemen present, and Mr McLaren was voted to the Chair. It was resolved—That a football club be formed. The subscription to bo five shillings. The opening day was fixed for the second Saturday in April, and it was decided to play, if possible, near the cricket ground. The Rugby Union rules were adopted. The officers were then elected, the result being as follows :—Captain, Mr A. Fooks ; Secretary, Mr E. Mayo ; Treasurer, Mr St George ; committee, Messrs J. Fooks, McLaren, Branson, Brett, Hodder, and the office-bearers. Besides those present/ about fifteen other players have given their names as willing to join, so that the club will start with about thirty-five members. At the conclusion of the meeting, Mr Stevens spoke at. some length on football. He said that being an old Australian player himself, ho took great interest in the game, and hoped those present would work well together and make a good club of it. Being in correspondence with one of the best Victorian clubs he was able to state that the Australian team having abandoned the idea of a trip to England, would most likely visit New Zealand, and if so, he had no doubt, if Ashburton had a fair club, they would play a match with the A.F.C. A vote of thanks to the Chairman terminated the’ proceedings. •

Waiting. —ln a certain well-known restaurant a man in a white tie is called the waiter, and the man who really does all the waiting is called the guest.

A Dourle Suicide.—At Ponte Trcsa, an Italian Custom-house officer having failed to obtain the consent of the father of liis betrothed to their marriage, the engaged couple fastened themselves together, and plunged into the river.

New Journal in Melbourne. —Mr Mortimer Franklin, the editor of the Victorian Review, is about to bring out a new weekly paper iu Melbourne. The new venture ia to be of a cosmopolitan character, taking up the ground more of such periodicals as the Satunlay Review than of the weekly journals. Struck by Lightning,— At 3 p.m., on Thursday, the 3rd inst. (says the Inangahua Times), a flash of lightning broke directly over Reefton, giving a bluish tinge to the atmosphere, which lasted for some seconds, causing great alarm to timid people. A largo .tree was struck by lightning at the same instant, and shattered to pieces. A plank was stripped off the tree as evenly as it could be done by a saw. The tree was fired by the lightning, and continued to burn throughout the night.

The Cerberus Accident. Th e coroner’s jury returned a verdict that the deaths in the recent torpedo accident were caused by the explosion of the torpedo, but there was no evidence shown as to how the explosion occurred. It was clearly proved that the electric circuit was not completed on board the Cerberus, and that the torpedo was not fired electrically. The explanation suggested by ‘Mr Ellery is that the torpedo contained dynamite. The evidence proved that Mr Groves had some about the time he was making the torpedo, and being composed partly of glycerine, and partly of dynamite, Mr Ellery thinks the escape of the former was the cause of tho accident. The Victorian Reform Bill. —ln the Legislative Assembly on Thursday last, Mr Murray Smith, leader of the Opposition, said that he recognised that tho Government had determined to pass the Reform Bill- in toto, therefore he considered it would be waste of time discussing the details. As a test point Mr Smith moved the rejection of clause 3, which provides for the dissolution of the Council on expiry of the present Assembly. This motion being negatived, Mr Smith said it was clear that tho Government intended to make the Bill acceptable to the Upper House, therefore he abandoned all the proposed amendments. The Tussocks. A correspondent writes : —“lf I mistake not, a short time ago our civic legislators, in Council assembled, passed a resolution to compel owners of unoccupied sections, who had failed to comply with the by-law requiring the removal of tussocks and other inflammable growth, to remove tho unsightly vegetation, and the question lias been asked whether any proceedings have yet been taken to carryout the Council’s wish. Those sections which have been cleared show how much the appearance of the township has been improved by clearing away the tussocks, but there are still a number of places where their existence is an eyesore to residents as well as visitors to the Borough. There are a number of “ unemployed ” hanging about the street-corners who, doubtless, would bo glad to assist in this desirable work, if the Council will only 7 bring necessary pressure to hear on the disobedient sec-tion-holders.”

Drinking ax Rage Meetings. —Says a writer in the Oamaru, Mail :—“One hundred and thirty-five pounds for the privilege of selling drink upon tho racecourse during a tw r o days’ meeting ! What food for reflection is here presented ! What scope for the eloquence of our moralists ! What a fruitful field for the employment of acute arithmeticians ! I fancy 1 can see one of those figure-wise gentlemen arraying before an astonished multitude a calculation showing the enormous number of ‘ refreshers ’ that the proud possessor of the privilege must sell in order to make a profit; for, mind you, in addition to the large sum paid for the

right of sale, ho must also pay for his stock, for fitting up) stalls, for cartage, for waiters, etc. Tell me, then, ye profound calculators, how many glasses of the 1 creature comforts,’ as they are euphe-

misticully, but cunningly, termed, musi the vendor sell in order to recoup himself

Then tell mo how many acres of land, how many teams of bullocks, how many horses and drays will have been swallowed by the bibulous. ” Printers’ Errors.—Our contemporary the Southland jSTe ujs has someone on his staff who devotes his spare time to detecting errors in the London Time*. A short time back the Southerner detected an error in our august con temporalI}', 1 }', the “ Thunderer,” and now he has succeeded, he says, in “ spotting ” no loss than fortyfive mistakes in one column, varying in gravity from a “turned letter” to the most egregious mis-spelling. There must have been a screw loose somewhere (remarks our contemporary) on the occasion of that “ dirty proof ” escaping the Argus eyes of readers and sub-editors. Had the thing occurred to any other paper it would scarcely have called for notice, but in the case of the one that has so long claimed typographical infallibility, it is quite justifiable. Hard-worked “all-round men” on the colonial press, who are sometimes twitted by lynx-eyed subscribers for a few misprints, may take heart of grace, and when again hauled over the coals point triumphantly to the Times issue of the 14th January, 1831, if not in justification, at least in proof that “ mistakes do occur in the best regulated ‘ typo ’ families.”

Silver Work for the Exhibition.— Mr A. Blytt, of Colombo street, Christchurch, has completed several excellent specimens of the silversmith’s art, for exhibition at Ashburton. These comprise a solid silver tea set of three pieces, viz., teapot, sugar basin, and cream jug, quite plain in design, but very massive. An epergne for fruit and flowers is very handsome. The glass centre rests on a large tree fern, worked in frosted silver, on the stem of which the leaves and tendrils of the grape-vine are depicted. On the base (which is also of frosted silver) is shown the figure of a Maori female, carrying a flax basket, and followed by a dog. These are executed in oxydised silver. In the back ground a flax bush in blossom is shown, in frosted silver, whilst embedded on either side of it are specimens—one of silver ore from the celebrated Rangitoto silver mine; the other of greenstone. The stand is of polished rimu. Next, a pair of burnished goblets arrest the attention. These also are on tree fern stems of frosted silver, on the bases of which are figures of a horse, plough, and sheaf of corn in frosted silver, oxydised silver, and gold respectively. A magnificent inkstand, silver mounted, with frosted silver top, representing an emu and a kangaroo respectively, is very elaborately finished. The bases represent two Australian blacks in combat, one of whom has partly fallen to the earth, and is shown presenting his shield to ward off the point of the other’s spear—a snake is gliding through the undergrowth, and a cabbage tree is very truthfully depicted. A pair of silver fruit stands are worthy of more than passing notice, the rims being very artistically wreathed with grape and vine leaves, the bases Fallowing Australian blacks and opossums. Six teaspoons, with foliated handles, representing part of a vine branch with fruit and leaves, are undeni- , able evidences of the craftsman’s skill, as indeed, are all and each of the articles manufactured. S .me napkin rings in gold and silver, are beautifully chased with different kinds of New Zealand fem leaves.— Press. <

The Telegraph Superseded. The telephone has been substituted for the telegraph between Kaitangata and Gatlin’s River,

“Pumped Out.” — A Sydney telegram states that it is clear from the play of the Australian Eleven in Sydney that they are quite pumped out and need rest.

The South Australian Harvest.— The Advertiser says that the present is the worst wheat harvest for ten years. The total yield is estimated at 9,000,000 bushels. Five millions arc available for export. Dead or Alive ?—lt was rumoured in Dunedin on Saturday, that intelligence had been received lhat Mr J. F. Jones, of the Grand Pacific Hotel, Dunedin, who was reported to have committed suicide at the Ocean Beach a month ago, has been seen in Melbourne. Attacked by an Octopus.— A diver named Inkster, working at Kingston Jetty, South Australia, recently was attacked by an enormous octopus, which dragged him twenty yards. With the assistance of another workman he managed to escape with difficulty.

Returning From the Races. —On Friday night as an hotel keeper named James Campbell was riding home from the Oamaru racecourse, he lost control over his horse and was thrown off. He fell on his head, causing a fracture of tho skull, and died on Saturday.

John’s Industry. —The Riverton correspondent of tho Southland News says that it speaks well for the industry and perserverance of the Celestial race that at the Round Hill diggings, which Europeans have neglected as of no account from scarcity of water, the Chinamen are able to make from LI to LIO per week per man.

Lunatics All. —There is in Victoria a Mr G. W. Rusden, Clerk of the Legislative Council, or something of that sort, who thinks that there is a good time coming for lunatics. He predicts that some day the lunatics will be in tho majority, and will incarcerate tho sane. No doubt (a contemporary cynically remarks), Mr Rusden’s Parliamentary experiences have constrained him to this appalling forecast. Canine Anglers. —A correspondent in the Otago Daily Times asserts that two unregistered dogs are in the habit of fishing in the Water of Leith. They drive the fish near the mouth of the Water of Leith, from the deep to tho shallow part of the stream, and then catch and make a luscious repast off the least active members of the finny tribe, which were probably trout “ not fully acclimatised.”

Defaulting Ratepayers. —At a meeting of tho Southland County Council, recently, a Mr Smith commented strongly upon the number of defaulting ratepayers in Awarua riding, mentioning several, all “ respectable gentlemen, some occupying high official positions.” Ho said it was shameful for the Council to allow poor men to be hauled into Court, and allow men who would bo insulted if they were considered other than “gentlemen” to escape or take their own convenience for paying.

Housewives Bfavare ! —lt may not be generally known that a person on opening a tin box of matches in warm weather, runs a risk of the contents exploding and in all probability burning tho holder. That such is tho case, however, is exemplified by the following, which wc reproduce from the Kapunda Herald : —“ A lady in Kapunda received her regular supply of goods from the grocer’s, including, amongst other things, a large tin box of matches. Bearing in mind a recent accident, she thought she would open these herself, and instead of holding them in her hands, placed them on the drawers, and then opened the lid gently. It was fortunate she had so placed it, for the moment the atmospheric air entered tne open lid an explosion took place, and the flame rose to the height of about a foot. The burning matches went on to the drawers and carpet, and but for the lady’s prompt action in throwing the contents of tho washstand jug over them the place would have taken fire. This should act as a caution to persons opening matchboxes during the present hot weather. Had the lady held the box in her hands whilst opening, the flames would probably have blinded her, and at least she would have been severely burned.”

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1881., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 298, 21 March 1881

Word Count
3,064

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna Est Veritas et Prevalebit MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1881. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 298, 21 March 1881

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