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THE IRISH TROUBLE.

- Trial of the Land Leaguers. The Jury are Unable to Agree. Debate on the Coercion Bill. A Member of the Commons Suspended. A Lengthy Sitting. [By Cable.] London, Jan. 26. The trial of the Land Leaguers was concluded to-da}'. After the judge’s charge to the jury the latter retired, but after eight hours’ deliberation they were unable to agree and were then discharged. Mr. Parnell subsequently delivered an oration to a large assemblage of people in Dublin. In the House of Commons last evening Mr. Gladstone moved than consideration of the Irish Coercion Bill take precedence of all other business. The Home Rulers thereupon proceeded to obstruct the passage of the motion, and a stormy scene occurred. Mr. Biggar, who proved one of the most violent obstructionists, was repeatedly called to order by the Speaker, and, as he continued his disorderly conduct, he was suspended for the remainder of the sitting. The debate has now lasted many hours, but the Government are determined to pass the motion, and will make the sitting a continuous one, declining to adjourn until they gain their point.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810127.2.10

Bibliographic details

THE IRISH TROUBLE., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 253, 27 January 1881

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186

THE IRISH TROUBLE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 253, 27 January 1881

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