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“ A Womast Alone.” —To-day’a portion of tlie story at present running in the Guardian is hold over. Masonic. —Masons are reminded of the installation of officers of tlie Somerset Lodge on Thursday evening. The installing officer is R.WJXD-G.M. Thompson, and the usual banquet takes place at the close. JRakaia Road Board. —From our report of the Rakaia Road Board meeting yesterday, it will be seen that Messrs. Allan, Mackie, and Coster were re-elected to the membership of the Board. Tffb Building Society. The usual monthly meeting of the Building Society was held to-day, and subscriptions may be paid at Mr. Bullock’s office this evening up to half-past eight. Mount Hutt Road Board Election. —Messrs Jackson, Pannett, andAlington have been returned unopposed for the vacancies in the Mount Hutt Road Board.

The High School. —Tenders are nvited for the necessary fittings, Ac., of the Ashburton High School, and it is expected, the school will open after the Christinas holidays. , The Flower Show. — A meeting of the Horticultural Society’s committee is to be held to-night, to make arrangements for the Flower Show. The meeting is an important one, and every member of the committee should be present. The Rakaia Concealment of Binth CaseA— The girl Brimmicomb was sentenced by his Honor Judge Johnston, to six months’ imprisonment, having been found guilty of the crime with which she was charged.

Cricket. —Ashburton Borough C.C, V. Tinwald C.C. —A ma*ch was played yesterday between the abo”e Clubs, on the ground of the latter at Tinwald, and resulted iu a victory for the home clu'o by 33 runs. The following is the score, Tinwald, first innings, 59 ; second, 52 ; Ashburton Borough, first innings, 38; second, 40. The oMy double figures obtained were Beeves (22) in the second innings for Tinwald ; and Barker (lo) in ;he first, and Hosking (10) in the set md, for Ashburton. The fielding and hoc ling were fair. At the Tinwald Hotel a firstclass luncl’ton was supplied by Host Scott, and the Tinwald players treated their opponents with great hospitality.

Cameron’s Sweep. —ln the multiplicity of sweeps that have been held durin; the past month or two a considerable number of pound notes and half-sovereigns save left this district to fatten the pockets'of the “consulting engineers.” It is pleasing to know, however, that there is a probability of one prize of LSOO returning to Ashburton through the win of Grand Flaneur in the Melbourne Chan (non Race. One of our most prominent 3-oni-faces, with other friends, joined in par. uership in one of Cameron’s “books,’ and were lucky enough to hold the number which represented Grand Flaneur. 1 * was currently reported in town that Mr. P 'ole, of the Hinds, held the winning ticket, and the rumor crept into a local contemporary as a fact. On investigation we find, however, that Mr. Poole drew a blank.

The Fatal Fiee ax Blenheim.—An inquest was held yesterday at Blenheim, on the remains of the unfortunate woman, Mrs. Daike, who was burned to death <m Saturday morning, as reported in yesterday’s Guardian : —The principal evidence was given by Daike, who stated that he and his wife were intoxicated when they went to bed. When he was awakened by the noise of the fire in the back room, he got up. He took his wife to the front door, told her to open the door amt run out. He did not open the door as she had plenty of time herself ; but ho returned to the bedroom to throw out what ho co uld. Believing that his wife had escaped, ho got through the window, and did not xuow she was missingl until the house was so far burnt that nothing could be saved. Other evidence went to show that the Daikes lived on good terms, and the jury returned a verdict “ That there was no evidence to show how the fire originated.”

A Caution to Theseassers. — A case was heard in the R.M. Court to-day, which will be interesting to those connected with the Racing Club. It wilt perhaps be remembered that the Racing Club leased from the Upper Ashburton (load Board the gravel reserve opposite Thomson's corner, at the racecourse. This reserve has always been a thorn in the side of the Club, on account of “ economical ” patrons preferring to hang up their horses upon it, to taking them inside the gates, and paying gate money. The economical ones were many, and their multitude when a race was being run was dangerous to the live fences surrounding the course. To extract the thorn we have referred to, the lease was taken by the Club, and at the last trotting meeting the students of economy were there in force. They were ignorant, however, of tho meaning this leasing had, and they innocently tethered on the reserve as before. Down came the secretary and swept away a troop of the horses, taking them inside the gates and handing them over to the poundkeeper, who was inside. Before the horses were released the pound fees had to be paid, ami gate money was also charged. To-day Mr. Spencer Stephens sued the said secretary, Mr- Wilkie, for L 5 damages, but after Inarlngplaintiff’s evidence the Magistrate, with a bland smile, said plaintiff had no business on tho reserve, .and gave judgment for defendant, less the sum of 2s. Cd., gate money, which the latter had paid into Co'-rt, plaintiff having t ' pay all expenses. Elgin School Treat. —Early on New Year’s Day the children, with their parents, who reside in the Elgin district, together wi:h some few visitors, met at the Schoolhou.fje. The children found that the ;oom of theiv daily avocation had been turned into a bazaar by soipe good Santa Ciaus. There were dozens of beautiful and useful things:—Pocket knives, books, china mugs, humming tops, cricket balls, soft balls, miniature tea sets, china tea services and dolls, sufficient for every girl and boy to have two gifts each. Mr. S. Scott opened the programme by -asprang on the pipes. The children then went tlpough the first part of their athletic sports very creditably, and showing that many of them had had some training. Running High Jump—Thomas Junes, 1 ; Thomas Cochrane, 2. Boys’ (over eight) Plat Race, 200 yards—John Innea, 1 ; Thomas Innes, 2. Boys’ (under eight) Flat Race, 100 yards—Allan Moffat, 1 ; A. T. Cox, 2. Girls’ (over eight) Flat Race, 100 yards— Mary Skillen, 1 ; Ellen Hoaten,2. Girls’ (under eight) Flat Race, 50 yards—M. J. Junes, I; Annie Skillen, 2. Sack Race— William Lamb, 1 ; Frank Cox, 2. Long Jump—Thomas Cb°h rane ) 1' Thomas Innes, 2. Three-legged Rice—Frederick Cox and Thomas Innes, 1 ; .fohq Junes and Thomas Cochrane, 2. Blindfold llace —Lizzie Moffat, 1 ; Thomas Cochrane, 2 Hop, Step, and Jump—Thomas Innes, 1 ; John Innes, 2 ; Frederick Cox, 3. Skipping—Ellen Hoaten, 1 ; Lizzie Moffat, 2. While the above sports were going on the ladies were busy preparing refreshments and making tea, Mr. O. Digby had given a splendid piece of corned beef for sandwiches, and other good things wore in abundance. After a hearty meal had been partaken of by all present, the whole of the children, numbering nearly eiuhty, each drew from a bag two tickets, numbers on which entitled them to two gifts possessing corresponding numbers. When this, the most pleasant part of the day’s proceedings, had been concluded the .children resumed the sports. Then came the distribution of sweetmeats, tarts, buns and biscuits ; and, after a good tea, everyone returned to their homes laden with their gifts, and happy both with them and their day’s enjoyment—the weather having also been most propitious.

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Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 233, 4 January 1881

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