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TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 5 p.m.] The Ashburton Guardian. THURSDAY DECEMBER 9, 1880.

Templary. Templars are reminded that a new lodge is to bo instituted to-night in the Templar Hall. There is also a probability of the Grand Lodge Executive holding a special sitting in Ashburton on Monday evening, on their way through to the Grand Lodge session in Wellington. The Licensing Courts —-All the new licenses applied for on Wednesday in Wei ]ington,Oamaru,and Invercargill, with one exception in the latter case, were refused. At Christchurch four were refused and two granted—a hotel license for Courtenay and a wine and beer cense for a cafd in Cashel street.

More Retrenchment.—The amalgamation of the accountants’ offices for the postal and telegraphic departments, which had been decided on by the Government, has been followed by a similar amalgamation between the accountants’ offices for the North and South Island railways. Instead of retaining a separate railway accountant for each Island, there will he only one for the whole colony, who will have his head-quarters in Wellington. This will enable considerable reductions to be effected in the expenditure, besides a material simplification of the work. Mr. Fyfo, the pi'esent accountant for the South Island, will receive the new appointment, Mr. Whitaker, the accountant for the North Island, retiring upon compensation allowance.

The Primitive Methodists. The quarterly meeting of the Primitive Methodist Circuit was held at Ashburton yesterday, and was well represented. The circuit was reported to be in a healthy condition in every respect. After making up for removals and deaths during the year there is an increase of fifteen members. The last quarter’s revenue was LGI 18s. which was considered highly satisfactory. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded the Rev. A. J. Smith (pastor) for the energy ho has displayed in working the circuit during the year, and Air. J. Scott, station steward, moved, and Air. T. Taylor, society steward, seconded, that he be invited to superintend the station another year, which was passed unanimously. The Rev. A. J. Smith and Alessrs. Watkins and Scott were appointed delegates, and Alessrs. Lill and Maidens, vice delegates to the distric meeting to be held in Dunedin next January. The Railway Tariff. —A meeting of members of the Agricultural and Pastoral Association was advertised to take place at the Town Hall last night, at half-past seven, to consider the question of the railway tariff. At that hour, a knight of the hammer, a member of the legal profession, and a reporter put in an appearance under the verandah of the hall, the doors of the building being closed. By eight o’clock, the number of persons who felt interested enough to attend such an important meeting had swelled to about a dozen, including several farmers who had come long distances. After waiting some time for the appearance of the convener of the meeting, the genial hallkeeper arrived, and blandly informed the company that he had been commissioned by the Secretary of the Association to intiniate that the intended meeting would Stand adjourned—from what cause, for what reason, or until when, the urbane Elston could not say. Growls, not loud, but deep, were given expression to, and shortly after eight o’clock the little crowd dispersed, vainly endeavouring f, o rid themselves of the opinion that they had bgcn the victims of a “sell.”

The Library. —The quarterly meeting of the Library members will be held this evening.

The Railway Tariff.—A public meeting re the railway tariff is to be held tonight in the Wakanui School-room. Ashburton School.— Applications for a third female teacher in the Ashburton School are invited.

The Incomers. —During last month there was an excess of immigration over emigration of 1,119 throughout the colony, 1,012 coming from Great Britain

Chertsey Sports and Races. —Th i programme of the sports and races to be held at Chertsey on New Year’s day is published in this issue. Geese. —Messrs. Quill and Co.’s day’s work on Saturday will include the disposal of 40 geese, besides pigs, poultry, and potatoes —a chance for Christmas.

The Northern Clip.— From Napier we learn that all accounts of the clip are to the effect that it is a heavy one. Sheaving is over, and there never was more more feed in the district.

Spiritualism. —A Spiritualistic Association exists in Auckland, and an emissary to bo imported from America will shortly stump this colony and Australia. Already a “trance medium'’ is at work in tlie northern capital, and intends to lecture.

“The Lady of Lyons.”— Wo would remind the friends of Mrs. Thompson (Lizzie Lizettc) that her benefit comes oft’ on Tuesday next, when the Lady of Lyons is to he played. She has, we dare say, still a ticket or two for her friends who have not yet supplied themselves. There will be a ball after the entertainment.

Judicial.— The District Court sits tomorrow, in the Court-house, and it is improbable that any sitting of the R. M. Court will take place, owing to the building being thus occupied. Mr. Martin, assistant Clerk of Court at Christchurch, has been appointed to succeed the late Mr. Hurrell ns Clerk of the R.M., and District Courts here. Mr. Wood, the R.M. for this district, is now in Ashburton. A Strange Bee Hive. —About three weeks ago Mr Boriaud, of Akaroa, noticed a swarm of bees circling about the top of a chimney communicating with one of Ids bedrooms. He afterwards found, to his surprise, that the bees had descended the chimney, and located themselves under a table, Yvherc they had already formed two large sheets of comb, and are apparently quite satisfied with their quarters, going and coming through some holes bored in the window-sill.

Fatal Accident. A man named Patrick McGuire died at the Ashburton Hospital at six o’clock last night from injuries received from a fall from a buggy on Sunday, sth instant. The deceased stated that shortly after passing Barrhill Hotel his whip caught in the nave of tiie wheel, and lie pulled up. While leaning over the side of the buggy to undo the thong his horse started, and he was thrown out, falling on his head and nock. He lay out all Sunday night, till some person found him on Monday morning, when he was taken to the Barrhill Hotel. Dr. Ross ivas sent for, who had him removed to the hospital. Mr. Macfurlano, the landlord of the hotel, drove him down on Tuesday. Deceased was a single man, in the employ of Mr. Thomas Jackson, an inquest will bo held at 1 p.m., on Friday.

Entertainment and Ball at Tinware. The entertainment given in celebration of the opening of the Tinwald Temperance Hall, came off last night. Owing to the failure to attend of manj' of the performers -who had promised to give their aid, the concert was less satisfactory than might have been. As it was, however, a passable programme was made, Mr. Joseph Ward presiding. The singers, Ac., were —Mesdames Tippetts and Dunn, Messrs. Branson, Harrison, Jephson, J. M. Dunn, Reeve, Shearer, Minnis, Williams, Jcssop, Ac., and, .at the close the usual votes ofjhanks were passed. A ball followed in Mr. Clark’s store, kindly lent by Mr. Clark for the occasion, and much pains had been bestowed on the decoration of the building. Mr. Nettleton with his violin, and Mr. Brader at the piano put life and mettle in the heels of some eighty couples, and Mr. Aitken kept the spirits up with refreshments.

The Maoris and Tuahi.—From private information received by the Taranaki Hnrahl, it learns that the Parihaka natives look upon the Opunake murder as the act of a dastard. They talk over it more than if it w.is a man who had been the ’’ictim. They say it is the work of a Prononga Kino (a bad or vile slave). Tuahi, it is thought, was not an attendant at the Parihaka meetings. He may have been there two or three times, but not oftener. The natives are strongly impressed with the notion that Tuahi must have been drinking previous to committing the act. Up to the present time Tuahi, the murderer of Miss Dobic, has appeared quite unconcerned regarding his approaching trial. His demeanor has been cheerful, and ho eats heartily and sleeps soundly. Ho is said to have remarked since his incarceration in the Wellington gaol, that he would be back in Taranaki by Christmas. Te Whiti says that “ As he has bitten like a cur lie may die like a dog.”

The Maori Ejectment.—The Omaranui dispute is now in a fair way of being settled. Yesterday, Mr. Sutton went out to interview the old chief, Tareha, and after some discussion the following terms were agreed upon : —-The Natives to give undisputed possession of Omaranui to Mr. Sutton, but the hitter to allow them to work at hoeing the crops in the ground, and to gather the grain when ripe. In the meantime, signatures are to be obtained to a deed giving in exchange for Omaranui another piecj of land of considerably greater value, the value of each block to be assessed by arbitrators, Mr. Sutton paying the difference in cash. Though Mr. Sutton’s men remain in legal possession, he informed the natives that- they would not in any way be restricted in the use or occupation of the land pending a settlement. The only condition he exacts is that e ,r ery time they want to occupy the pah or go on the land they shall ask permission from tlie men in possession. Newi-ands Tea Meeting.—On Monday last Newlands presented quite a lively scene, occasioned by the anniversary tea in connection with the Primitive Methodist Church As it was contemplated that there would be a goodly number present, great preparations were made in order to satisfy the demands of the inner man. The Primitives, however, bad evidently over-estimated the eating powers of their visitors, for, although upwards of 130 sat down to tea, there was still an immense load of viands left. There were six tables, all of which were given, and cheerfully presided over by Mesdames Watkins, Lloyd, Parker, Grayburn, Lill, and Robinson, who spared no painstomake the tea agreeable to each taste. After tea, there was the usual public meeting, when addresses were given by Revs. Keall, Beattie, Smith, and Messrs. Scott and Hodder. One notable feature in the meeting was the heartiness of the congregational singing to the ancient times pitched by the precentor, Mr. G. Aston. Another element in the meeting was the babies, apd tljp “ zest” they displayed wj'jlp crying gained tji.em an earnest name. They apparently seemed determined while one rev. gentleman was speaking to “cry him down,” but he bravely struggled through, and, after the children had been bushed to sleep, it proved to bo a very profitable and enjoyable evening. It is estimated the receipts will be over LIG. The usual votes of thanks terminated the meeting

A Butter Shipment Home. —Being dissatisfied with the low price now ruling for butter, Mr. ft. W. Hamilton, of Flint Basil, Southland, has determined to send a, trial shipment home, per Jessie Readman, which leaves the Bluff in a few days. He is now salting down a large quantity.

Proposed Presbyterian Union. —At the meeting of the Oamavu Presbytery, yesterday, the Rev, Mr. Ryley brought up an overture for presentation to the Synod to arrange for the union of the churches of the North and Smith, and an assembly of delegates from all pvrts of the colony at stated periods.

The Premier.— The Premier will leave Wellington on the Wednesday before Christmas for Christchurch, with a view of spending his Christmas holidays on his station in Canterbury. The Colonial Secretary will leave Wellington on Friday next for Dunedin, where he will spend his Christmas holidays. Lake Rotorua. —The Government have succeeded in arranging for a township to bo laid off at Lake Uotovua. A sort of sanitorijm will be formed there, and the town will be laid off in the best possible way so as to render it a convenient and attractive place of resort, not only to invalids, but for tourists generally. Ihe land will be held by the Government in trust for the natives, and all payments will have to be made through the Commissioner of Crown Lands.

A Duffer Rush. —From nows received, it would appear that the Stewart’s Island “ Reef ”is a myth. Acting under pressure, Roper was obliged to open up the tunnel whore the leaders were said to be buried. After about twenty shovels of dirt had been washed a solitary speck of gold was found, and although the supposed leaders were followed a considerable distance into the hills no reef could bo found. The specimens found by Roper are pronounced by experienced miners to be nothing but mundic. The miners are returning thoroughly disgusted.

Ligurian Bees. —Mr. F. Adams, the secretary to the Canterbury Beekcepcis’ Association, informs us that ho went on board the Rangitikei shortly after her arrival on Tuesday evening, when ho learned from Mr. Chaplin, who was a passenger,' that the Ligurian bees which this gentleman bad brought on board had unfortunately all died on the passage. Mr. Chaplin had four hives and two queens (all Ligurians), but after being awhile at sea they wore attacked by dysentery, and the last died about three weeks before the cud of the voyage. Mr. Chaplin states that Captain Milman gave him every assistance in his power, and allowed him one of the ship’s boats to put his hives in.— Times.

Fatal Accident at the Grey.—A fatal accident occurred yesterday morning to Mr. Robert Mcllroy, the well known storekeeper, belonging to the Seventeen Mile Beach. Deceased was driving some cattle on the beach, near tiro Cobden punt, when one of the bullocks escaped from the others. In endeavoring to head it, deceased attempted to cross a small lagoon, when ho slipped off his horse and was drowned. His body was recovered in about half-an-honr, but he was quite dead. An inquest was hold on the body before H. A. Stratford, Esq., Coroner, when a verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned. Deceased was a native of Belfast, Ireland, and leaves a widow and six children.

Pi: ison Inspection'— The now Inspector of Prisons, Captain Hume, who recently arrived from England by the Durham, has already entered upon Ins duties, and has been assigned an office in the General Government Buildings near that of the Minister of Justice. Captain Hume is about to commence his first tour of inspection throughout the New Zealand prisons. He will begin with the Nelson Gaol, ann then make a complete round of the South Island prisons. The North Island gaols will be visited subsequently ; after which a full report will be presented to the Government on their present condition and requirements, with a view of placing on the estimates for next session such sums as may bo found absolutely necessary to put the various prisons of the colony in a thoroughly efficient state. The nmnber will be reduced so far as practicable.

lloi.i.owav s I’l l.l.s —The blood being the cry essence of health and life it is most essential that it should be thoroughly purified before the depressing iiillnenccsof winter displaythemselves. These Pills will accomplish this purification in a safe and satisfactory manner, and out the circulation in that desirable condition, which alone can rightly form flesh, bone, muscle, nerve, and skin. Capricious appetites, weak digestions, torpid livers, and irregular bowels are corrected by this potent medicine, which may be truly said to imhcc “a sane mind in a sound body.” Holloway’s Pills possess the remarkable properly of cleansing without weakening. While purifying they arc strengthening and* adding to those enjoyments of life which health and vigor can alone bestow. —A dvt.

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TOWN EDITION. [Issued at 5 p.m.] The Ashburton Guardian. THURSDAY DECEMBER 9, 1880. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 212, 9 December 1880

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