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The Ashburton Guardian. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1880.

TOWN EDITION. [JsstcecZ at 5 p. m. ]

The Railway Tariff. —A public meeting to protest against the evils of the present railway tariff is to bo held tonight at seven o’clock in the Waterton Library.

The Racing Club.— -A general meeting of the Racing Club is to be held at Quill’s Hotel to-morrow evening to receive the financial and other reports, and to arrange for improving the course.

Death of Mrs. Nugent Wood.— Yesterday Mr. Nugent Wood was to have sat on the Christchurch Bench, but received a telegram in the morning announcing the death of Mrs. Wood at Riverton. The lady died suddenly on the day previous, and Mr. Wood has of course gone south, where he will remain for a few days.

Longbeach Cemetery. —ln the Gazette of Nov. 25, received last evening, it is announced that the following gentlemen have been appointed trustees of the Longbeach Cemetery : —John Grigg, Andrew Dawson. James Moore, Norman Thompson, and Thomas Taylor. Mr. Grigg’s name is misprinted “ Griff.”

The Fire Brigade. —The usual practice of theFireßrigade was held last night, when the engine was taken over to the cricket ground, and, in fulfilment of a promise given,to the club, the pitch was thoroughly soaked. Horses for the journey of the engine were supplied by Messrs. Parkin and Dolman, but we were sorry to observe that as usual the hard work of pumping was left to be performed by the members of the' Brigade alone. We should fancy the Brigade will practice on the cricket ground another time —when the cricketers have a little elbow grease to spare, and are willing to spend it.

Hard on Editors. —General Haskell o‘ the Salvation Army entertained a large crowd on a St. Louis street corner the other day. He told them that he was formerly a circus man and a good cardplayer. He said that over in East St. Louis the Army had a camp where they fed the hungry. He didn’t care who came —if he was right out of the penitentiary and was hungry he should have something to eat. It was no use talking religion to a hungry man. First fill his stomach. You could never convert a hungry man. There had never been an instance of it on earth. Of the different political parties, he said that there were good men in each party, good men in the Democratic party as well as in the Republican. More than that, there were good men who were editors, and in Casey county, la., George W. Ashton, editor of the Clarion, had been converted to God, the first instance in the history of Chriatianty.

The Caledonian Sports. —A meeting of the directors of the Caledonian Society was held at Quill’s Hotel last night, at which it was decided to hold the sports in the yards of the Agricultural and Pastoral Association, The Society is to be congratulated on securing the show yard, which is well fenced off, and in every way suited for the gathering. Arrangements were also made for selling the privileges of the sports, and Messrs. Quill, Reid, and Anderson were appointed a Committee to draw up conditions of sale, Mr. Quill to be auctioneer. It was decided to advertise the programme of the sports immediately, and instructions were given to have that done forthwith, at a cost of not more than LlO, the managers of the two newspapers having promised to act liberally by the Society in the matter. Mr. James Wilkie, captain ; Mr. J. C. Dolman, lieutenant; and Mr. George Parkin, treasurer of the Fire Brigade, attended, and asked the Society’s patronage for the entertainment to be given by the Brigade on the evening of the first clay of the sports. The request of the Brigade was complied with, and several individual members of the Caledonian Society, who aided greatly in the success of the recent Scotch concert, kindly, promised their help to the Brigade. Before closing, the meeting resolved to hold directors’ meetings every Wednesday evening at eight o’clock, until sports day.

Trotting. —Trotting is the sport of our American cousins, and, like all other things to which they have given their special attention, they have much elevated the sport, and the sure and steady improvement in the trotters’ speed is a thing to be noted. In 1859 Flora Temple first trotted a mile in the “ teens,” scoring 2 min. 19fsec., and so wonderful was it considered that the length of the track was seriously doubted. Not until 18S7, when Dexter made 2min. 17|sec., was that record beaten. Four years elapsed before Goldsmith Maid, in 1871, lowered the time to 2rain. 17sec. In 1872 the same gallant mare clipped off another quarter of a second, while in 1874 she lessened it successively to 2min. IGsoc.; 2min. Is|sec.; 2min 14|sec.; and 2min. 14sec.; but at that time none but she could beat herself. Four years later, in 1878, Raven wrested the honors from the Maid, trotting in 2min. 13jsoc., but his crown was snatched from him by St. Julian in the fall of 1879, when the new hero trotted in 2min. 12|sec. The value of these extra seconds is, of course, enormous. It is said that 100,000d01., or nearly L 21,000 has been offered for Maud S., who has just beaten St. Julian, with the marvellous record of 2min. 10|sec. To give our readers some idea of the pace attained by the latest champion, we may state that it is just about equal to that of the winner in the Ladies’ Purse at our recent race meeting.

How to Quiet Them.— Several Maori prisoners at Ripa Island haring been unruly and defiant of late, their liberal allowance of food has been reduced to bread and water.

The Wheel of Life.—Mr. Ward

registrar for this district, reports for last month : —35 births, 3 marriages, 7 deaths —3 from accidents, 1 from cancer, 1 from consumption, one from inflamation of the lungs, and one from tubercular meningitis.

Inquest. —The inquest we referred to yesterday, was held at Chertsey, in the afternoon, before Dr. Trevor. Dr. Stewart performed the post mortem examination, and bore evidence to the cause of death being “embolism of the right auricle of the heart.” The jury returned a verdict accordingly. Unclaimed Letters. —The following letters from places beyond the colony were received at the Ashburton Post Office during the month of October, and remained unclaimed on the Ist December : —W. Benham, J. Griffiths, Fredk. Howard, A. G. Jaques, John Riddle Kerr, Patrick Nolan, John O’Connell, Daniel O’Connor. H. Reed (2) William Robarts, H, L. Stapley (2), Michael Holden.

The Town Hall. —lt took an hour to run in enough shareholders of the Town Hall Company to form a quorum last night. The gentlemen who were most bitterly opposed to reducing the number of the quorum and bringing the holding of a general meeting at any time within the bounds of possibility, were conspicuous by their absence. All the business requiring to be done was the formal confirmation of the resolutions jiassed on the 19th October, and five minutes sufficed to do that after the hour had been wasted.

A Modern Soloman. —A very good story is told of Captain Beckham, who was the Resident Magistrate at Auckland for many years. A young woman brought a man into Court for. the sustenance money for a baby, of which he was the reputed father. In order to escape pay-ment,-the man brought three or four other mean skunks to swear that they were equally guilty. Judge therefore of their consternation when Beckham ordered each of them to pay five shillings per week for a number of years. Captain Beckham was applauded, the woman delighted, the men dumfounded, and baby numerously fathered.

Spurgeon's Style of Preaching.— ln the course of a sermon lately, Mi*. Spurgeon told a story of an Irishman who once found a sovereign, and, taking it to the bank, it was reported light weight, and he could only get 18s. for it. One day ho saw another sovereign, but this time he thought he would have nothing to do with it. “Shore no,” said Pat; “I lost 2s. by the last one.” When the laughter occasioned by this story had died away, the preacher added with great earnestness, “ I have made you smile that you may laugh to scorn the foolery which keeps men from Christ because some of His servants are not all they ought to be.”

A Red Hat in the House of Lords- —“ A clergyman who has recently come out from England says that the extraordinary spectacle of a Roman Cardinal sitting in the British House of Lords will be witnessed before many years. It seems that the heir apparent to the title and estates of the Petre peerage is a Roman Catholic priest, upon whom the Pope has recently conferred the title of Monsignore. The rev. gentleman has already renounced his claim to the estates, but of course he cannot dispose of the title in the same way, and when the present peer dies the Monsignore will succeed to his seat in the House of Lords (of course if ho should survive him) and beyond doubt will rereive the Cardinal’s hat from the Pope. The School Treat. —At a special meeting of the School Committee, letters from Mr. John M‘Lean, Lagraohr, and from the traffic manager of the railways were read. The former granted the use of his paddocks for the children on the IGth instant,and thelattcrgave the terms on which the children and their friends would be conveyed per train to Lagmohr —Four scholars would be taken for 2s. 9c1.; two teachers for 2s. 9d. ; and the public at 2s. 9d. per head. This was considered high, and the Committee resolved to try the manager again, with a view to having a special train put on forLIO. The members of the Committee undertook as usual to canvass for subscriptions, and we hope they will be well received by friends of the school and scholars, when the visits are'made. The annual examinations were fixed for the 20th, the ministers in town to be asked to do the work and aw r ard the prizes, the wives and daughters of the members of Committee being requested to examine and adjudicate upon the sewing work. Government authorised the Committee to advertise for a third mistress at £—per annum. The next meeting of the Committee was fixed f»r Monday, when the canvassers would report. Poisons in Paris. —The Paris authorities have recently been preaching a crusade against the use of poisons. It seems some flagrant instances have been detected, and thatnothingshortof vigorous measures could suppress a dangerous practice. In many cases the use of the poison was almost gratuitous. Arsenic in room papers, it is admitted, gives a brilliant hue, now indeed no longer fashion-

able, but very beautiful, and not otherwise to be obtained. The poisons which have been selected for suppression by the Parisian police seem to have a less imperative raUon d'etre. They include a kind of yellow sackcloth in which American hams have, in certain cases, been packed for the European market. Many of these are quite harmless, and keep the commodities fresh and pure, but in some chromate of lead has been used to render the sackcloth waterproof, if not air-tight, and though the result has been attained the hams have been poisoned. A peculiar kind of salted herring has also been placed on the schedule of comestibles, as the analysis shows that the color is obtained from bichromate of potash. But a more

insiduous attempt has been detected in the case of children’s toys, colored with poisonous paints. The French authorities when they commence a crusade generally continue it to the end, and their efforts differ both in energy and success from the capricious and dilatory proceedings by which, in this country, slightly poisonous

food is often allowed to be sold with im punity. —London Gluhc.

Closed or Letter Telegrams in Paris,

—lt would appear from some recently issued statistics of the French telegraph service that the system of closed or letter telegrams is already largely in use in Paris. This method of communication consists ip blowing the telegram paper itself through a pneumatic tube instead of manipulating its contents verbally along the telegraphic wire; and it appears that the pneumatic system at present at work in Paris has a total length of 79,600 metres, and that it is worked from six stations, at which are located steam engines having a total power of 153 horses, besides six water meters. The service comprises a main system with double line, at which terminate seven supplementary systems with branches. Trains run every three minutes on the main system, and every five minutes on the supplementary systems. The system was introduced on the Ist of May, 1879, and it is now possible to communicate from one part of Paris to another and receive a reply back for little more than half a franc, or about one-fourth of the cost of an ordinary telegraph message in London. The extent to which the pneumatic service is used in Paris may be Judged from the fact that something approaching 400,000 despatches of all kinds pass over the system every month.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1880., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 206, 2 December 1880

Word Count
2,220

The Ashburton Guardian. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1880. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 206, 2 December 1880

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