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Ashburton County Council.

The ordinary monthly meeting of the County Council was held to-day in the County Ohambei’s— Mr. C. 'W. Walker, Chairman, (presiding). There were also present Messrs. E. G. Wright, E. S. Coster, Julian Jackson, T. Bullock, John Grigg, Duncan Cameron, and Alfred Saunders. ,

chairman’s statement.

Tho Chairman;'-in a short' statement, summarised the work to be done by the meeting, and explained thjit the special meeting required by the Counties Act, would be held at noon. engineer’s report.

The Engineer’s report was read as follows : ■

Approaches, South Ashburton River Bridge, Blount Somers.—TYrs work, as contracted; for, has now been completed, as has also the protective work in river bed, which the C ouncil authorised with a view to secure the south approach to the bridge. Approaches to North Ashburton River Bridge, near Pudding Hill.— The contractor has done all that was required here in completion of his contract, and Mr. Black, the contractor for the protective wbrk.in connection with these approaches,' has at last' started wdrk there.' Dam at Budding Hill. —All that was required at the date of last Council meeting to finish this, contract was the putting in of 29 cubic yards of concrete. This has now been finished satisfactorily. Concrete Channel for Initial Main. —This \ydrk is being carried on in the manner prescribed by the Council. The channel has been executed' ,to ■ the extent of one-third of the requited length, and jtfi.e necessary excavation has been completed over a further distance of about 40 chains. You will obscrye that, for the land to be acquired for the race between the rivei and Chapman’s creek, the terms asked by the owners are almost nominal. Indeed, Messrs. I. and T. Meek offer to give an absolutely free right-of-way through their section. I am now preparing to start on work for this race, from the outfall of' concrete channel across to Chapman’s creek. : This latter creek will also require to be well cleared out to where the creek runs out, nearly opposite Mount Harding, and from this point to the West Coast road a new channel for it will have to be cut in the general line of its natural outfall. I have also arranged to commence work along the road line from Lyndhurst upwards, and should the works go on without intermission, the different sections should be competed by the end of January next, so as to admit of one line of supply reaching Lyndhurst by lhat time. I would beg to suggest that nothing be dope below that ppint in the meantime until the result, Tq fay, is proved, especially as a short time would suffice t.o bring the water from there to one or more lines as might be determined, and I shall be glad to have the Council’s instructions in this matter. As the day-wages men null require to be paid again before the Council meets in January, I have included in the certificates laid before you tQ day a sum for this purpose. Filter Basin, Melhpen. —A few days will suffice to complete the excavations for this basin, after which the fencing will be (peeled as specified. iVinckvtore and Methven Drainage Extension,—This work is in hand, and about half the earthwork has been completed..

Stock- Yaodi' Ashburton. The various works contracted for have been executed. The alterations and additions requested by the Agricultural and Pastoral Association, and sanctioned by the Council, are now also nearly compiACf'J. Pfpkctlve Works, North Ashburton River. _ —As requested by the Council, I have carefully' examined the various points Of encroachment over the district situated between Mr. Hart’s homestead and the Town Belt. As that portion of the Forks district, in which the works executed some months since by the Council may be said to be included in this compartment of the river, situated, as they are, near the end of it, I will take up that part first. And here I may state that, for the security, more or less, of the various works of protection which have been executed over a length of two miles of the river from Cpod’s downwards, it is indispensable, in the first place, that a breach in the embankment near Good's be restored, and secured with stones and gorse, with a small grpin at either end. The mrpense of this T estimate at T 52, and I pointed out the work, in detail, to Mr. . .William Sutherland, ilje original conlractpr, ! who will undertake it at LSO. Not a day should be lost in getting this done, as the present state of the river there is now most favorable for the purpose, and I tnist that the Council will authorise the expenditure of this sum. The main groins at Weldon’s are now acting very effectively, and actively gathering silt, and so securing the banks which were so seriously threatened there. A little below this there is a point which should be somewhat strengthened with gorse and stones, and the small embankment should be extended for a chain apd a half. The expense I estimated at L27', but as ft affects Mr. Sutherland’s own land in the first instance, he is prepared to do the work as specified hi lh us contributing Ll2 towards the expense' of it. He has also been at some expense personally In seeming this same point. If these two works were done, the protective works hitherto undertaken in that quarter would be comparatively safe. At the boundary between Messrs, \Vcldon and M ( Chuvch, there is a weak point b» the river bank, extending fully five chains, and rjquiping an _ embankment, raised about three feet ip height and well secured at ends. The cost would be L4S, and the expense I consider should be borne, equally ; by the owners and the Road Board, the property of each being equally imperilled. Another case similar to the last arises on M r, Craicrheacl’s land, immediately above Winchmore road crossing, where a wid th of about twm chains, for a length $f spygn chains, has , been ■washed away during the last fevy months. An outbreak here would inivitably destroy that section of the Winchmorg road, and also do much damage to the Alford Forest road and the district generally. The'expense of efficient protection at this point may be set down approximately at L9O. The place next in order d.y situated about half a mile above Robins’ on -the 'north bank of the river. Here the current strikes right against .the Joy/ fiver bank, which now abuts on the road., , The danger here is not so great, however, as would appear at first sight. No great change has taken place, it seems, for some years, and though the fiver bank there is too low for absolute security, the material of which it is composed 1; very compact and not liable to be shifted jrcaddy. ; A ,[crfite, off stqnes \ placed, at each end of the indented portion would be the means of securing and strengthening that part of the bank, and if this were followed up by a judicious planting of willows in suitable spots, the result would be still more beneficial. Here I may say that the willows planted in so many places along the course of the river are thriving well, and

point to the desirability of a greatly extended area of such planting when the proper season comes round. The protective works put in by the Council at Digby’s, near the Alford Forest road crossing, have had the effect of entirely checking the floodwater there, and preventing such an overflow as took place towards the township some two years ago. Another encroachment is taking place along the roadside near the bend of the river—a mile and a half from the Town Belt. Here the bank is about thirteen feet in height, the lower half of which is composed of open shingle, so that the river is liable to extend to the road at no very distant date. The gap already cut out extends about three chains back from the original line of terrace. This damage seems to be mainly caused by the projection of a sharp point of land into’ the river from the opposite side, so turning the current unduly to the north side. I have not sufficient data to estimate very minutely the expense of cutting through said point, but I should say that the total cost would not exceed L7O, on that being done and the river assuming its normal course there, the portion referred to, which has been scooped out, could he planted up with willows, which would, thereafter, in my opinion, prove ample security at that point. The banks are so high; here that there is certainly no liability to overflow,‘and the chief point to be considered is whether the road line may not be encroached on by and bye, thus necessitating a new location for that. part, qf the road. Under the circumstances, this seems, to me to be a question almost entirely for the Road Board to deal with. The next place is on sections 20,327 and'20,864, both situated in the river bed, aboir half a mile nearer the township than the point last described. There is considerable encroachment on both these section's—-the former to the extent of fully six acres. Here the river divides itself into two channels, that on; the north side having been scooped out by the .formation of a bar, which now partially shuts up the original channel on south side. - I should propose jtQ clear this grip away by a Cutting about three chains in length, so leading the water to the south side, and then planting willows from the terrace to the river in such manner as to act asgfoins, and so gradually restore ; the ground washed away. The greater portion of the river bed -here,;fqr a length of five chains, should then he planted with willows. . A'sum of L2O would! I estimate, clear the said grip sufficiently, and the owners themselves might be expected-to do the necessary planting. . The last portion I have to report on is situated about a quarter, of a, mile bnly from the Town Belt. The encroachment has taken place not only on river bed sections Nos. 19,311 and 23,417, but has also extended to'the terrace, .which is . laid' out jin suburban sections. Of the river bed there is about. five acres washed away, and of the terrace portion (which is about 20 feet above river bed), about a quarter of an acre. . The clearing, aivay of a jutting piece of stiff land on the south side of river bed would give great relief here, following up by planting the affected portions. The expense of earthwork alluded to would be about L3O. I have laid considerable stress on the .utility of.willowplanting along the course of the river, as I am convinced that the training of these rivers can be greatly assisted by such means, if taken in a timely manner and properly followed up; and as the'Council has voted a sum for planting purposes, I would beg to suggest for their consideration, whether a part of it might not be jirofitably applied in willow planting for river conservation. An expenditure of LiSO over the entire courses of North and. South Ashburton Rivers would give much, security, and at, the same time yield such a nursery for extended' planting as would, in connection with careful tending of the river with respect to other minor work, render the work of conservationia comparatively simple and inexpensive trust. . ' !

Water ton Drainage. —No. i contract is nearly completed. The contractor for contract No. 2,has llpown it up, thus forfeiting his deposit, and P. Tally, the next lowest tenderer, has taken up the work. The remaining contracts are well advanced. Daainage, Lower Hinds . —When I last .reported on this subject, I dealt principally with the question of improvement of the Hinds river, which must form the basis of all works of drainage in this locality. The utter inefficiency of the;present channel from BbiJndaj-y ro.ad, but more especially from Surveyors road downwards, : would seem to render it imperative ip the interests of the district that a larged capacity should be given to the Hinds river from the points referred to, either along the course byway of Boundary drain, which is the present course to the sea,.or by a new cut to the " Big Gully,” as shown in red on plan, leaving the present channel ala point about3o chains below Surveyor’s road. The former scheme was that originally reported on by me, as I hardly thought it was within the scope of my instructions at. that lime to consider exhaustively the question of entirely changing the. present, course which leads along the Boundary drain, Thjs drain forms the division between the principal properties in that quarter, and discharges' into the 'Boundary creek, which terminates in the Little Gully at the point set down in the Government maps as the mouth «T the Hinds. It is apparent, that, over.an area there of many square miles, indeed from the Boundary; road downwards, the river Hinds formerly emptied itself into a huge monies, which discharged, by more than one mouth into the sea, no sir,all proportion of the discharge taking place through ths sub-stratum. Had the river on that portion of the plains taken any defined course, or discharged in volume in any one direction, it would have left wider and deeper traces than is at present apparent for three or four miles from the sea. There is ng doubt, howevei, that the general course of creek leading fro.iji Boundary drain to the Big Gully, represents the most direct outlet, and by discharging the river in this direction, the Boundary drain, Rogue’s creek, and Boundary creek could be made available at a conpiaratively cost, as leading drains for the improvement of Lowcliffc estate. It is questionable, however, whether the course of this proposed new channel would not be liable to considerable damage under heavy floods on so direct a line, and on these portions Laving the greatest declivity, but I believe the proprietors aie.willing to take the risk of" this'. My estimate of the Hinds river improvement, according to accompanying plans and sections, is as follows : • ,

Newcutfi-oin bead of Ilig Gully to proposed junction with Boundary drain, z}4 miles, i9S,qooeubicyards, Excavation froip latter point ' to Surveyor’s road, 1 mile 38 chains, Bj, 000 cubic yards, at

£5,212 10 O The improvement of the river from Sui-v vcyor’s to Boundary road, by taking off all the, abrupt turns as shown on plan, and forming flbodbanks for some distance on each side of river near Boundary road, would cost a further sum of 1.900, but that portion of the work does not seem so essential in the meantime. The foregoing estimate does not. include bridges or fencing, but earthwork merely. The improvement of the various creeks in that locality is a question of .subsidising drainage, which would, I presume, be .wholly effected by the courses conceived, and into which it seems uhneiteiitiry to enter at present. Wii.liam Baxter, County Engineer. THE INITIAL DRAIN. It was resolved to take the initial drain to : the railway line, the drain not to exceed 15ft. deep, this depth to be reduced if practicable where ■ the shingle was near the surface. Tenders for this work were ordered to be advertised for, to be sent in within one'week from this elate. The Chairpian was authorised to accept a tender, the work to be advertised to be divided into one or more sections, and to be completed by the 15th January; 1881. Where . the' drain passes through > private lyiifl the terms required by owners were to be ascertained-. ■ " b THE SPECIAL'MEETING.' Mr. Coster moved the re-election 1 of ■ Mr. Walker ,tp the Chairmanship of the County. ' - ■, V: ", - Mr. Walker said that lie was about to' remove his residence to a more 'distant, partMf the County, and he wopld not bo able tq devote so much 1 time to the duties of the position squired. He. felt compelled t<j decline thp nongip, , Mr. E. G. Wright Hoped Mr. Walker, WriQsg Chairmanship had throughout given the uiipost would reconsider his decision. ' Mr. Grigg spoke,-in,high. terms of Mr. * Walker, and was followed by Mr. Bullock in a similar strain, both urging Mr. Walker to permit himself to be re.-elected,; Other members spoke desiring Mr,

Walker to reconsider, but Mr. Walker could not see his way to discharge the duties of the position satisfactorily to himself, owing to the distance of his residence from town.

Mr. Bullock proposed that a sum of LIOO be voted to the Chairman for past services. The motion being seconded was passed. N ‘ . : On the motion of Mr. Wright, it was decided to postpone the election of a Chairman till after lunch, with a view to giving Mr. Walker time to reconsider, and the Council an opportunity to look round for a new Chairman in the event of Mr. Walker not conceding to the Council’s wish, that,he should accept the position. The- ordinary ' business' was ■ then resumed. ~ ■ - PAINT. The Engineer was ordered to ascertain the relative cost of Carson’s paint and that manufactured from Nelson hematite. NORTH ASHBURTON RIVER PROTECTIVE ‘ - 1 . - WORKS. It was resolved .that the work, at Mr. Sutherland’s be advertised, and tliat the Engineer be authorised to accept Mr. Sutherland’s offer to execute the second piece of-work mentioned in the report, for .Ll 5, to secure the already executed works, and that the rest of the Engineer’s report on of the protective works be ' Board. ' THE HINDS DRAINAGE WORKS.

After a lengthy .discussion on ,the subject of the Hinds drainage as reported on by the Engineer, it was decided to hold over till next meeting any decision as to the amount of money the Council should vote for thefwpyk;.- Mr. ;Wright thought L 2,000 was a fair amount to be voted for the work in the Hinds district, and Mr. Grigg was of a similar, opinion, , Mr. Saunders thinking that before, anything was'done the area of private land affected by the proposed expenditure should be ascertained. The Clerk was instructed to /make a retirfn of the different sums spent on drainage ; on river-protection ; and on water supply in the different districts, and the ! areas' >of land affected in each case. ; - i I',' .i'*

HOSPITAL ' ‘ Messrs. Fook-Si taiid iSbn i reported as follbWS' i+r-

r : We beg to report bh the completion of the works under our direction qt.the {Gpqntf'Hospital. Wc have omittedfone itemjprop'osqcl — namely, the ventilation' of the steam cooking apparatus in the kitchen. It appears that this apparatus is hardly necessary, and cannot well be used, being, wc understand; clefcCtHb in its arrangement. The boiler, hovever, could be utilised by converting it (altering the pipe's so as to connect it with a galvanised iron tank) into a circulating,boiler for supplying another bath, and also the sink iu.thc scullery. Besides' the-substantial additions and alterations we. have had the defective joints in the stonework pointed, many of the' hoses re-fixed, and lose slates replaced, (and the window-sills requiring it, finished with, a cement weathering. The exposed external walls have been' treated with three and four coats'of silicated' paint; • The earthcnware ; pipes .carrying the rainwater to the concrete tank have ibepn re-laid with cement joints, and the liquid drainage has been re-ar-ranged on a plan that admits 'Of its being utilised in the garden. .We will furnish the Council with a plan showing the buildings with the arrangements of rainwater, drain-pipes, etc. ■ 1 The matter of the boiler was referred to the surgeon. THE RAILWAY TARIFF. The report of the Railway Tariff Committee was read, as already published in these columns; with . the.' .General Manager's reply to the Committee’s representafion., The Chairman iri a short ' speech in which he showed generally •,the injustice of the tariff, moved the adoption of the report, . . . .. -. ,■ - ; , . , Mr. Wright expressed liis intense dis satisfaction with Mr. Maxwell’s reply Government had, seen fit to get rid of Mr Conyers. It' was a pity that they did pot also get rid of .his amended'tariff, 39 that the new manager might have started with a clean sheet under the old tariff. Unless the farmer can receive some encouragement in the shape of diminished charges and increased prices, the growth'of grain would be largely reduced, and wool take its place. He had taken out from the Gazettes, and from the information supplied to The; Railway Oommissiohers,; the following figures to show - hsv/Canterbury was used under the now tariff :

Abstract, showing the cost of Construction, also , Revenue ? a : nd > Expenditure and profit on capital invested in the following Railways, for a,period of 258 days, from the 7th January, 1880, to the 18th September, 1880, inclusive :

Pro rata profit for twelve months, £137,724, or per cent, upon The cost of construction and rolling stock. ■ Or, taking the Christchurch Section alone, without "‘its branches . . Amberley to Temuka, including Port lino—Receipts, L 178,888 2s. 8d; expenditure, LBG,73S 11s. lid-; Profit for period of 255 days, L 92,149 10s. 9d. Pro rata profit for 12 months, L13L899, or equal to £9 Is. lid. per cent, upon £1,450,020, the cost of construction and rolling stock. This district was therefore; contributing under the old tariff a sum of £45,000 for the benefit of the other railways in the the colony, and under the new tariff it would pay.'£loo,ooo. The whole thing was: -i utterly ; mnjuat, : and piroved that the, Minister fob Fdblici Works and tlio j department. . were ignorant'’of.udiat,.they! werpedbingi ; -or at least of the 1 . profits; : that iKi» line-' < was making. ! He had not time to go into figures 611 the hues up to Oamaru, but ho had no'doubt these would also show ’as ! favorable a condition, |that»rit was The'”"lines north of these' that'Vere riot ptofif By Tljei curtailment lot ! useless hahds ’ on tile railway, the profit in the Ohrlstoliurch : section hdd, risen irom- 3£ per caiit rtp ( .9 ,lr^pthj; ; ;..He. ;hqp# -.the: Council, wppld' move in the matter of haviriig the thrift reduced. Why should the’ farmer bo compelled to pay by "rates on his grain fqr, p the logs made by: the Government’ in -carrying 'timber'"at rates that would not pay. in'the ftpiTh Ishipd coal was carried at a far lower rate jovei'da givest ‘of miles than in the Middle Island. It was 'pi-esmpc/l by the Government that the increased; rates wquld increase revenue* but hb'felt this was a. mistake, amf yas} surp that, even in this inland district, they could cart their wool to Lyttelton at

the saihe rate as they were now charged by the railway, and there were many farmers who would rather employ their own teams in this way than give the money to the railway. Mr. Saunders rose to support the motion. It appeared to him that the present General Manager of Railways had made a childish mistake in his reference to the charges for grain, wood, and coal. There was an immense loss to be suffered be the Customs if the grain growers were converted into wool growers. This was a suicidal policy, and it ought to be placed before the Government in the strongest light, for the agricultural population, would be driven away from the colony. The reply given by the General Manager did not raise the abilities of that gentleman in the opinion of Mr. Saunders. Mr. Grigg spoke against the tariff. He said if the question of value of goods carried was to be considered by the Government in the imposition of the tariff, then it was equally justifiable to argue that the cost of construction oughtto be considered, for the Canterbury lines had cost the least money of any. He thought the policy now pursued by Government was an unjust one, and he hoped for some result in the House of Representatives itself, and with the power that this province possessed in the House, he believed that the manifest injustice of this tariff could be removed if the many sensible men representing it united to oppose the Ministry that countenanced it. Mh Coster and Mr. Cameron also spoke. Mr. Saunders said that the representation of this province under the new Bill was insufficient. It was only proposed to give four now members, while she was entitled to six.

The report of the Committee was adopted. Mr. Wright moved that this Council invite the co-operation of all representative bodies in Canterbury, to assist in the removal of the injustice inflicted upon the grain-growers of the colony under the present railway tariff. Mr. Grigg seconded the motion, which was carried.

Mr. Grigg'mored that the Committee be instructed to carry out the foregoing resolution, and draw up and forward a reply to the Railway Manager’s letter. RE-ELECTION OF THE CHAIRMAN. When the question of the election was again considered, Mr. Walker announced his willingness to retain the office for another year, and was duly elected. THE POUND. Mr. Cameron moved that a Committee be formed for the purpose of considering the by-laws for regulating pounds in this county, such Committee to consist of Messrs. Grigg, the Chairman, and the mover. The motion was carried. MICELLANEOUS. Messrs. Gresson and Mackay wrote in reference to the water supply, and the access to it on both sides of the channel running through their property, and from Mr. E. Chapman, Chairman of the Mount Hutt Road Board, re the north approach to the Pudding Hill bridge. The terms of both letters were agreed to, METHVEN POUNDKEEPER. The Council resolved, in compliance with a recommendation from the Mount Hut Road Board, to dismiss the poundkeeper at Methven, and to ask the Board to nominate a successor. STORM-WATER DRAINAGE. Mr. Edward Chapman, Chairman of the Mount Hutt Road Board, wrote, asking the Council to take the matter of where the storm-water was to be directed into their own hands, owing to the difference of opinion and antagonistic interests that existed in the district. He requested the Council to make a scientific examination of the ground, and take on the original course of the creek. The letter was referred to the Engineer, and the Clerk was instructed to yeply that the matter would be taken in hand as soon as possible, PUDDING HILL DAM. Mr. Wilkie applied for consideration at the hands of the Council. The specifications of the Padding Hill dam contract had led him to believe that suitable boulders for the work could be obtained in the ri ,T cr bed within forty chains of the job. He had cleaned up the river bed for a distance of seventy chains below the dam, and twenty chains above it, and had been out of pocket £BO in consequence of this. The application was not entertained. DOG REGISTRAR. Mr. R. D. Pullar wrote resigning the position he held as dog registrar under the Council. Mr. Bell was appointed registrar, and the other appointments of this kind were confirmed. THE borough’s WATER PIPES.

The Mayor wrote saying that in consequence of the county having granted the Borough liberty to dispose of the iron water pipes, the Borough had undertaken several very urgent works, in the hope of being able to dispose of the pipes. In consequence it had now a debt of L 747 9s. 3d. to liquidate this debt, and to proceed with the covering in of the outfall drain, the Borough now desired to pledge the pipes to the Bank, so as to obtain an overdraft of L‘2,500.' A statement of accounts, and a memo from the engineer’s accompanied the letter. After discussion, it was resolved that the Council agree to the proposal, with the proviso that the pipes shall not bp sold below cost price without the Council’s consent. THE WAKANUI BOARD’S LBl. The Wakanui Road Board wrote, making further representations and explanations regarding their recent claim for the sum of LSI expended over and above the Council’s grant. It was resolved to pay the money,' and to write a letter of explanation and warning to the Board. THE TIN WALD-WINSLOW DISTRICT. It was resolved to do nothing in this matter until a meeting of the ratepayers of the Longbeach district had been held. THE ASHBURTON BRIDGE. Mr. Wright read a letter he had sent to the Railway Engineer explaining a better method of planking the bridge than that adopted at the Rakaia bridge, and by .which all inconvenience and source of danger to passengers in crossing the bridge would be removed, such at least as arose from the existing grooves, which were very objectionable. The plan would be more economical, as it would save the necessity of replanking the whole bridge, most of the timber being good enough for another year or two. The letter was approved of. PLANTING. I . The following members were appointed a Committee to consider the expenditure of the planting vote, &c.; Messrs. Walker, Coster, Jackson, and Wright. FINANCE—TENDERS. Several accounts were passed for payment, and after the tenders for dog collars ha,d been opened, and that of Mr. Bunbar, of Christchurchj accepted, and ope from Jenkins'—for sinking ii well Vt the Hinds, the Council adjourned.

Miles. | Receipts. Expenditure, jcost of Railway Chrfetchwrch ’Section .. - Do. ‘ do. Oxford Branch .. "Do. -do. Eyreton Branch.. --Do. _ do! ■Southbridge Brandi Do. do. ’ .. •Spring-field and Whitecliffs Branch .. Do. do. do. . 127 : 21 42 ' -£S7*7A* 15 11 .23/, Z46 6 9 .1,270 j8 9 742 9 2 1,261 111 .3.311 8 0- ’. ..5,626 7 0 2,876 10 1 6,158 3 0 ' L.27,457 11 10 59,281 0 1 1. 2 35 3 J° 2.236 17 1 791 10 6 1,584 1 4 2,038 17 6 . 4)4 2 9 1 9 . 2,242 16 x'i 5,028 10 3 L, 1,450,020 79)3^9 66,696;, it?6,S^9, I:T 7>75*] ■ • ■ r -- ,£■202,545 .4 6 *106,335 ix 1 r - L. 106,335 11 ;i L. 1,830,745.' •Profit for a period of 255 days.. • ■ ■£9 5,219.13 ,5

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Bibliographic details

Ashburton County Council., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 199, 24 November 1880

Word Count
4,973

Ashburton County Council. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 199, 24 November 1880

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