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WIRE FENCES.

To the Editor. Sir, —Having for some time f*,lt the want of some plan to take the wire out of old fences, I came across a hint the other day (I think in the Agriculturist) which I have applied to practice with satisfactory results, and which I offer to farmers and others interested. A wheel in two parts of about two feet in diameter and four inches in breadth, with two flanges of six inches in height, is made fast to a wagon or dray wheel (wagon best, as it stands firmest). When you begin, the wire is cut at both straining posts, and one end with one turn passed round the wire wheel on the wagon. The wagon is lifted offUie ground, and with the aid of the purchase of the wheel of the wagon the wire is wound neatly round the wire wheel till you have about one cwt. on the coil, then one half of the wire wheel is taken off, and the coil of wire drops off as neatly wound and as useful for use again as new ware. Last week I wound out about one ton, and the market value would not be more than L2 less than new wire, and that principally on account of rust. For all practical purposes it is as good as new wire. If this letter saves any of the money going out of the country for wire it will effect some good, and if any person wishes any further explanation, by stopping me in the street or calling at my office, I will give it to him. In conclusion, I may say that the wagon, as it moves along, takes with it wire, stakes, Ac., and the whole thing is cleared up in one process, and very quickly.—l am, &c., Joseph Clark. Tinwald. P.S.—This letter being non-political, and only for good, is sent to both Ashburton papers. 28th October, 1880.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18801030.2.13.4

Bibliographic details

WIRE FENCES., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 180, 30 October 1880

Word Count
323

WIRE FENCES. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 180, 30 October 1880

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