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The Ashburton Guardian. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1880. Flemington School.

TOWN EDITION. [lssued at 5 p.m.]

In this issue we publish a letter from a member of the Flemington School Committee, in which the writer makes out a severe case of neglect against the Education Board. The letter tells its own story, and shows how in the scramble for favors the Flemington district has been chucked aside by the Board. We confess, after reading the Committee member’s letter, to feeling that the Flemington district has certainly been ill-used by the powers that be, and that it is now the duty of the Board to make what reparation lies in its power. We of course look now for the usual answer to applications for new schools —that the funds ot the Board will not permit expenditure on new buildings. But really after the manner in which the unfortunate Flemington District has been dealt with, the Board ought to make some effort to plant an educational institution in the locality. We know of several places in the County where schools and schoolhouses have been erected at almost extravagant cost, and where the need for them was not nearly so great as in the Flemington district. Those of our readers who have travelled along the road from Tinwald to Ashton know how long that road is, and the Tinwald school, in the west, and the Ashton School, in the east are the nearest seminaries to Flemington —and a journey to either means many miles travelling to a great number of children. After the apparently fast and loose way the Board has dealt with the Committee (which exists as will be seen from the letter, only in name) it appears to us the Board ought to make one last effort to give Flemington a decent school.

Oats foe. England.— The Lurline at Oamaru is loading up with 12,000 bags of oats for the United Kingdom.

Holidays.— His Worship the Mayor has declared the two days of the Ashburton Racing Club’s annual meeting halfholidays from noon. The dates of the race meeting are the 17th and 18th November.

The Knife. —A solicitor in Palmerston North named Madden is accused of misappropriating money belonging to a client, and the Law Society is applying to the Supreme Court to have him struck off the rolls. The case is still pending.

Caledonian Society. — A meeting of the Caledonian Society was held last night, at which it was decided to take no steps at present for the purchase of a sports ground, but the duty of looking out a site was entrusted to a committee. A meeting of Directors will be held on Tuesday to arrange a programme of events for Boxing Day. Fatal Result. —Yesterday Mr. John MacLauchlin, who a fortnight ago sustained a wound in his leg while chopping a black birch post, died at Tinwald from the effect of the wound. Mr. MacLauchlin was to have been buried on Sunday, but it has been decided to hold an inquest on the body on Tuesday, so that the funeral has necessarily been postponed.

Recovering. — A young man named Fearon, recently went into a state bordering .on insanity, the result of mental strain put upon him while preparing for examination as a solicitor. He had to be sent to the Wellington Asylum for a time, but has now been released. Since he took ill his success in his examination has been published.

Mail Services. —lt is understood that some further reductions in the cost of mail services are in progress, by which a considerable saving of expense to the Colony will be effected, while the convenience to the public, Judging from the extent to which the services about to be curtailed have hitherto been used will not materially suffer. Blum Pasha, one of the Prussian officers long in the employ of the Porte, has stated, in a report to the Sultan, his deliberate opinion “ that even in their present condition the Dardanelles and Bosphorus could not be forced by any number of ironclads without the most terrible loss. The Prussian Pasha adds that, by sinking torpedoes and submarine mines the Straits might be rendered impregnable.

Tinwald Temperance Hall. The Tinwald Temperance Hall is in an advanced state of progress, Mr. Tippett, the contractor, having got the frame erected, and partly covered in. The late wet weather has delayed the outside work a little, but it is expected that in about three weeks the hall will be completed. In connection with Tinwald, we may add that the township is steadily forging ahead. We notice three new cottages have just been added to the list of tenements, and two more are in course of erection.

A Railway Romance. —The Dunedin police are investigating what at present seems a strange affair. The driver and conductor of the 9.30 a.m. train from the Ocean Beach, yesterday, reported that just before reaching Jones’s Hotel, a shot was fired at the car. Their statement is so far backed up that a window in the car was found to be broken immediately afterwards. There were no passengers in the car, and the conductor, who appears to bo of a romantic turn of mind, thinks that the shot was fired by a jealous rival in a love affair.

Tinwald School; —The alterations and improvements that have been for some time in progress at Tinwald have been completed this week, the contractors, Messrs. Bailloy and Co. having finished their work on Wednesday. The improvements consist of a new class room, 22 feet by 21 feet ; new infants’ room of the same dimensions ; a gallery calculated to hold sixty children ; a new corridor, 20 feet by 8 feet; and a lavatory. These have all been added to the old building, which has undergone thorough repair and renovation, and altogether the school now presents quite an imposing appearance from the outside. Inside the walls have been plastered, etc., while a four-feet dado runs round each room. The whole alterations have been made with a view to the children’s comfort, - as well as to increasing the accommodation, and we think the ends aimed at have been fully achieved. Several outbuildings have also been added. The extensive planting operations that have been undertaken in the school grounds will also help, in conjunction with the additions to the building noted above, to make Tinward School one of the most attractive school buildings in the county. It may be noted that the ceilings of the new rooms are considerably higher than the general run of schoolrooms, being 20 feet high, thus securing greater ventilation, and, consequently, a purer atmosphere for the scholars.

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The Ashburton Guardian. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1880. Flemington School. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 174, 23 October 1880

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