Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

IVESS Y. MARTIN.

To the Editor. Sib, —I should think our egotistical friend, J. Ivess, when he, penned the letter that appears in this day’s Mail, must have had the Kilbarchan weavers’ prayer in his mind, viz., “ The Lord send us plenty of conceit of ourselves. ” Of all the vapid, inane effusions this beats everything. Don Quixote is dead—Councillor Ivess lives ; long live Councillor Ivess. In my opinion he is only another example of that portion of the braying public whose sound and fury signify nothing, and instead of calling his neighbors to account he should begin at home. Mr. Branson will no doubt be able to defend himself if he thinks it not too derogatory to notice Mr. Ivess’ letter, but poor Mr. Martin, lam afraid, is not so well able to enter the lists, and it is only as an onlooker that I take up the cudgels in his defence. We all know the effect of a protracted lawsuit. To Mr. Ivess it was a fine opportunity to air his eloquence ; but to Mr. Martin, suffering physically and mentally, it was no such joke ; and Mr. Ivess’ crow should be small when he learns that Mr. Martin paid the amount —not that he considered it right or just, but simply to avoid the worry attendant thereon, and against the advice of his solicitor and friends. Knowing something about the matter in dispute, I can safely say that, however much Mr. Ivess may crow over his alleged victory, wore the facts made public it would redound but little to his credit. I have seen, in the course of my experience, many attempts at evading contracts, and this is only another to add to the list. Had Mr. Ivess complied, when requested by Mr. Martin to give him a written agreement, all this ligitation might have been avoided ;. but with his usual evasiveness he shirked the question. One would have thought that to so great a inan as Mr. Ivess the paltry sum in dispute would not have mattered so much ; but I suppose he does not forget the days of beer and bread and chesse, of which the editor of the Ly’ell Argus notlongago remindedhim. Ashburton ought to be proud to possess so shining alight.—lam, &c., Nemo. Ashburton, Oct. 19, 1880.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
382

IVESS Y. MARTIN. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 170, 19 October 1880

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working