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The Ashburton Guardian. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1880.

Kicked out of a Hotel. —At the Christchurch R.M. Court this morning, Charles Johnston was committed for trial for unlawfully wounding two barmen by whom he had been ejected from the White Hart Hotel. Masonic Funeral. —The Freemasons of the Ashburton Lodges are to meet on Sunday at one o’clock to attend the funeral of their late brother, T. A. Ross, who died to-day at the early age of 24 years, and after a long illness. Matson’s Store. —The large building just erected for Messrs. Matson, Cox and Co. in West street was opened to-day. There was a sumptuous luncheon spread for the guests, of whom there was a large number. A report of the proceedings appears elsewhere.

Cruelty to Animals. —The R.M. is down on heartless brutes who illuse dumb animals, and were are glad to see it. He lined a man named Hill L 5 to-day for leaving his horse for 12 hours without food or drink, and tethered up so that it could not reach for a bite of grass.

The Racfcourse Siding. —This morning Mr. Back, General Manager of RailWcTys, accompanied by Messrs. Jameson and Saunders, inspected the site of the proposed siding at the racecourse and Agricultural and Pastoral grounds. It was decided to recommend that the siding should be put in a few yards beyond Mr. Thompson’s house, on the racecourse side, and that the railway cattle yards should be moved to the same locality, but upon the opposite side of the line.

A Gas Fact. —lt may not be generally known in Ashburton, but it is a fact notwithstanding that, should a tenant of a building fall behind with his payments for the gas he consumes, the Gas Company hold his successor in occupancy responsible for the amount, and refuse to supply the said successor with gas until the debt due by the previous tenant has been paid. It is a somewhat short-sighted and illiberal policy, but it appears to have been followed in Christchurch, and of course our Company are bound to follow the example.

The Bye-Laws —There was a bye-law field day at the R.M. Court this morning, when a troop of footpath crossers, horse tetherers, obstructionists, and others were put through. Two cases of more than ordinary interest were heard. They were those of carters who, not plying as “carriers” in the general aceptation of the term, but only doing carting in a general way, had neglected to take out licenses as carriers. They were fined the usual 55., with costs. A Pestilential Stench. — This morning His Honor Judge Ward, previously to adjourning the District Court at the conclusion of its sitting, enquired if any of those present knew of the existence in Ashburton of an Inspector of Nuisances. There was, he said, a most pestilential stench permeating the atmosphere of the Judge’s robing-room, and as the Judge spoke with some animation on the subject and made a reference to the owners of the hall, which, however, we did not catch the exact tenor of, but should imagine it was not a compliment of the highest fervour, we conclude the effluvium was of the strongest—so strong, that our reporter did not care to risk a snifl. His Honor is not the first who has growled about the stench in the ante-room, and at the back of the hall, and it would he worth the Directors’ trouble to have it remedied. Perhaps it has become so strong that the Directors are afraid to look near the back settlements of the hall, but how about those, and more especially the ladies, who at the numerous entertainments given in the building, have to use the room that so nearly suffocated [ his Honor to-day.

Quill & Go. —Messrs. Quill and Co. hold their usual sale on Saturday, when they will dispose of a large assortment of general goods. No More Sea-Sickness. —A large company assembled, by invitation, on the Havana steamer City of Alexandria, to inspect the operations of the new selflevelling berths with which that vessel was fitted. The New York Post says that these berths are of ordinary size. They are attached both above and below to universal joints, and are weighted underneath by crescent-shaped cylinders of iron. This arrangrnent is designed to keep the berths perpetually level, no matter what angle the vessel herself may take, and, consequently, to do away with sea- sickness entirely. To further maintain the berths in their orbit, and prevent sudden changes of position, they are provided with spiral springs. They appeared to work well, and the visitors expressed their satisfaction without stint. They are to be introduced into all vessels of the line, and other lines have the matter under consideration.

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The Ashburton Guardian. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1880. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 167, 15 October 1880

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