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TELEGRAPHIC.

LATEST FROM EUROPE.

(Per Renter's Agency. ) London, Sept. 29. News has been received from the Cape that tho Basutoa again attacked ■ the station at Mohales, but were repulsed by the Cape Mounted Rifles. A relieving force has arrived in Basutoland from Natal. Consols are unchanged at 97f. ; New Zealand securities remain as at last quotations. ' ■ ’ The total reserve of notes and bullion in the Bank of England is L 16,250,000, being half a million-less than last week. Adelaide arid New Zealand wheat have advanced sixpence per quarter, and today’s quotations are—Adelaide, ex warehouse, 465. 6d. ; New Zealand, ex ship, 425. Gel. Adelaide flour, ex warehouse, is quoted at 325. Gd. London, Oct. 1.

Further advices to hand state that the Albanians are mustering in strong force at Dulcigno. H. M. S. transport Hecla has taken torpedoes and boats to the island of Corfu. One thousand pounds reward has been offered for the discovery of the murderers of Yiscoririt Mountmorres, who was shot dead in his carriage at Donburn a few days ago. The report received yesterday that the Albanians had set fire to Dulcigno is now proved to have been devoid of foundation. Latest news to hand from the combined fleet is that Admiral Seymour has decided to leave Ragusa on Monday, and proceed south to the Gulf of Gafctaro, which is deemed a safer place of anchorage. Nothing definite has yet been decided as to when the fleet will proceed to Dulcigno.

At the Cabinet Council held yesterday, Earl Granville, Foreign Secretary, informed his colleagues that lie had had an interview with Musurius Pasha, the Turkish Ambassador, regarding the difficulties between Turkey and the Great Powers, and he (Lord Granville) was able to state that the Porte is receding from the position it had taken up, and was now endeavoring to dissuade the Albanians from offering resistance to the cession of Dulcigno to Montenegro. Constantinople, Sept. 30.

The Ambassadors of the Great Powers have signed a protocol, declaring the solidarity of their Governments in regard to the strict execution of the Treaty of Berlin, and repudiating the idea that they have any desire in the direction of territorial aggrandisement. , Constantinople, Oct. 1.

The Porte to-day has addressed a request to the Powers, through their Ambassadors, asking that it may be allowed to delaj' until Monday, when it promised that definite steps should be taken to bring about a solution of the Montenegro difficulty. Rome, Oct. 2.

General Garibaldi has gone to Genoa, in connection with the arrest and imprisonment of his son-in-law, Signor Canigio. ■ - New York, Oct. 1.

There' .is considerable excitement throughout America over the approaching Presidential Election, and speeches are being delivered by the prominent leaders of both parties. Both General Grant and Mr. Evarts (Secretary of State) have delivered speeches in favor of the candidates of their respective parties,

AUSTRALIAN

{Per Renta's Agency.) Melbourne. Oct. 1

Arrived—Te Anau, from the Bluff. The Legislative Council last night rejected payment to its own members, but passed the clauses of the Bill providing for payment to members of the Assembly, A further animated debate took place in the Assembly last night regarding the recent dismissals from the public service. Tho Totalisator Bill was read a third time, and Parliament adjourned to October 19th, when the Budget will be presented.

Melbourne, Opt, 2,

Many more officers of the Lands Department have received notice that their services will be no longer required. Melbourne, Oct. 4.

The P, and O. .Company’s Hydaspes, with the inward Suez mail ; and Money Wigram’s steamship Somersetshire have arrived here.

Tho Aye states that an intrigue is op foot to oust tho Berry Government after the recess, and Sir John O’Shaunessy and Mr. Murray Smith are combining with that object.

Sydney, Oct. I,

Arrived —Albion, from New Zealand. Hennessy’s brandy, case, 355. 3d. to 355. 6d.; bulk, quarters, 10s. 6d. to 10s. 9d. . New Zealand wheat, 45.; New Zealand oats. Is. 9d. to 25.; maize, 2s.!'to' 2s. 3d. The Revenue of New South Wales for last quarter amounted to L 1,224,000, being an increase of L 197,000 compared with last year. Satisfactory increases are shown in nearly all sources of revenue. Adelaide, Oct. 4. The Orient Company’s steamship Aconcagua has arrived from Plymouth, The Sopth Australian revenue for last quartet amounted to L 496,000, being an increase of L 87,009 as compared with last year.

INTERPROYINOIAL.

Per Press Association. Auckland, Oct. 2. The Star reporter was excluded, from jib® theatre by Mr. Lingard for giving an unfavorable notice of “ H.M. Pinafore ” in the Star last night. ■ Ipp narrates tho cipcuffistanc.es, and''ridicules the J>?99.f§4-

ings. He says:—“lt p>hujes this office under the dreadful necessity of paj'ing two or three shillings whenever wo deem the proceedings at the theatre worth reporting for the information of our readers, and relieves our reporters from the boredom of listening night after night— in order to oblige the Company—ftp any wretched representation Mr,- Lingard may chose to present.” He adds—“ If Mr. Lingard puts before the public performances that will not stand the light of day, or which provoke unfavorable criticism,- the consequences must be on his own head, and not on that of a critic who refuses to distort facts for the purpose of misleading the public. This is unhappily the case with * H.M. Pinafore.’ On Lingard’s, own admission more than one member of the Company ought never to have been permitted to open in the comic opera, and the public verdict would probably be the same of the entire combination.” Mr. Luscombe Searell, Lingard’s agent, replies in to-day’s Herald, in an ungrammatical tirade, that it was not because of the notice of Pinafore the reporter was excluded, but because it compared Mrs. Lingard unfavorably to one of the minor parts.

Auckland, Oct. 4. A little child was decoyed away and stripped of its clothes in the suburbs this morning ; supposed to be the act of some drunken woman.

Arrived—N.Z.S. Company’s ship Waikato, 90 days from London to land. On the 15th of August spoke the Waitangi, boundto Lyttelton. She brings eighteen saloon passengers, second, twenty-two ; steei’age, fifty-six. Ovalu, schooner, from Roratonga. On the night of July 25th, a severe gale was experienced in Raratonga harbor.' The Ovalu and Agnes Donald both anchored there during the night. They came ■ together several times, and considerable damage was caused to the Agnes Donald. The Ovalu lost her largo boat in attempting to get a hawser on shore.

A subscription is being raised for Mrs. Rees, widow of the man murdered by the Fijian. A meeting was held on Saturday to form a Seamen’s Union. Thirty attended, and it was decided to start one the same as at Fort Chalmers. Sixteen paid subscriptions. Twenty-six employees on the Auckland railways have mutually agreed to leave the service and proceed to the Cape unless their wishes regarding the adjustment of wages are complied with. The Supreme Court criminal sessions opened this morning. Judge Richmond, in his charge, commented on the smallness of the calendar, but there were some heavy charges. The crime of murder by a New Hebrides nafive occupied the foreground. The murderer was an utter stranger to his victim. The cause seemed to be an outburst of ferocity. It was rarely that a New Zealand settler was brought up charged with such a crime. The prisoners charged with this offence were generally of a foreign or inferior race—seamen and other visitors. Commenting on the growth of larrikinism, he supposed one principal cause was that boys -were too early apprenticed, and the demand for labor was so great that they obtained high wages. There was also less home restraint than in England. In church and school the teachers’ powers fail to reach them, and the only effectual moans was to bring them under the penal code. He and other judges had resorted to this, but there was a dread risk in introducing boys to associates who would destroy their chances of refonnntiou. The subject raised points in morals, public policy, and religion which that was not the proper place to discuss. At the Supreme Court criminal session George Wm, King, for selling arms to natives, was sentenced to one day’s imprisonment. The Judge thought the prisoner, being a new arrival, did not know the law respecting the sale of arms. At the inquest to-day on th® young man named Murphy, who was removed from the police station to the hospital on Saturday, a verdict was returned that death resulted from a fall from a cab through a collision with another vehicle. The jury were of opinion, that no blame was to be attached to the police, and they thought that it was not advisable to bring in a rider to this effect. No accusation had been made against the police. The out-put of coal at the Kawakawa mines for September was 5,090 tons. At the football match, New Zealand v. the World, Cook, of the World team, received a kick in the ribs which knocked him down and he had to be helped off the field. Henderson, the captain of the New Zealand team received a gash over hia eye which was an inch and a half in length. The schooner Edith brings news from Samoa to the 4th September. Sir Arthur Gordon has issued a proclamation prohibiting Walter J. Hunt from being within the Samoan Islands for two years, on the ground that his presence is dangerous to tho peace and good order of the Western Pacific Island. The proclamation was issued on the depositions of a number of persons, Featiierston, Oct. 2. ■

Stanley Nicholas has died through the injuries received at the Rimutaka accident, making two of this family killed Wellington, Oct. 2. A man named John Andrews, better known as Joe Murphy, cabman, met with bis death to-day under rather peculiar circumstances. It appears that he was driving home about two this morning when his vehicle struck another cart, arid the shock precipitated him from his seat to the ground. He was picked up and placed in his own vehicle. A constable made his appearance, and there being no apparent injuries deceased was taken into custody on the charge of drunkenness. Andrew's was placed in a coll and given blankets to sleep on. He was visited by the sergeant several times during the early hours of the morning and made no complaint of having sustained any injuries. At nine o’clock he was again visited, and appeared to be asleep but breathing heavily. He was examined by the sergeant and found to bo in an unconscious state. Medical assistance was sought, and Andrews was conveyed tp the hospital. He, however, never regained consciousness, and expired at noon. The cause of death was concussion of the brain An inquest will be hold and probably an investigation will also be held as to whether the police are to blame. Andrews was aged twenty-five, and leaves a wife and two children. An associate of his states that he saw the deceased at 1.30, when he was perfectly sober.

Wellington, Oct. 4. A telegram just received from the Heads states that the brigantine Hannah Broomfield is wrecked on IJncqnstant Point, half a mile inside the light-house. I f is not known yet how she went ashore, but it is believed she missed stay. She is full of water. • The vessel is owned by Messrs. Greenfield and Stewart, timber merchants. The captain is on his way to town. Insurance —South British L 1,200, of which L 350 re-insured in tho Victoria and L 350 in the National. Later. The Hannah Bloomfield was in command of Captain Highfield. She left Hobartown on 23rd ult., and brings a cargo of timber, palings, and a few tons of general cargo. It is believed the cargo is insured for LOGO, office not known. It is blowing a hard N. W. gale. Rewi has telegraphed to the members of Parliament here, that he knows nothing of any coal company at Mokau, and has sent a messenger to Mokau to stop any movement in that direction.

The Magistrate dismissed the charges against the two constables for alleged illtreatment of a prisoner as being only an error of judgment. He pointed out several defects in the police system, and hoped to see them, remedied without delay.

Another man who had been looked up for drunkenness last night, has been removed to the hospital with a sprained ankle. Dunedin, Oct. 2.

A. L. Beattie has been promoted to be Acting Locomotive Superintendent at Palmerston, Invercargil seption. The Herald states that Mr. Conyers demands an apology from the Cromwell Argus for an alleged libel on the railway department appearing in that paper.

The Industrial Committee wrote to the Colonial Secretary urging that Government should discourage the Christchurch proposal to have an inter-colonial exhibition. This Committee thinks 1883 will be quite soon enough to consider the matter, when the claims of Dunedin will be urged.

Dunedin, Oct. 4. Judge Williams, in charging the Grand Jury, referred to the Kyeburu murder as follows “As to prisoner Ah Lee, the case rests almost entirely oh his own confession. If you think the confession, so far as he acknowledges his connection with •the offence, is to be believed, you should find a true bill. The question may arise hereafter as to how far the confession is admissible as evidence at all, but with that you have nothing to do. The confession of Ah Lee is not admissible in evidence against Lee Guy. Ah Lee appears to have been examined before the Magistrate when Leo Guy was charged with the murder, but, on examination, he in effect retracted any confession he had made. I presume therefore that Ah Lee does not appear as a witness. Ah Lee’s account of the transaction, as not given in the presence of Lee Guy, is not receivable in evidence against him, and the case against Lee Guy is accordingly to bo considered apart from the statements made by Ah Lee. The other cases on the calendar called for no comment. .

The Grand Jury returned true bills against James Williams for perjury, and against John Thomas, John Dutton, and Isabella Thomas for wholesale larceny at Dunedin. John Thomas pleaded guilty. The trial of the others is proceeding. Mrs. Thomas pleads that she was acting under coercion.

Dutton and Thomas being convicted on the first charge, plod guilty to nineteen others. The J edge sentenced them both to seven years penal servitude, saying he could see no difference between them. The Crown offered no evidence against the woman.

The Mount Ida Chronicle says the Chinese have subscribed LIOOO towards the defence of Ah Lee and Lee Guy ; the collectors having visited every part of Otago. The Chinese say if the accused are hung the Europeans will not in future employ Chinamen, therefore they combine to get their countrymen off. So far, they have put every obstacle in the way of the police. The body of Eirrell, who was drowned near Portobello a few weeks ago, was recovered yesterday. Holverscn’s claim at Hyde is again on good gold. Invercargill, Oct. 2. The lady principal of the Girls High School has resigned. In her letter she says— <l I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of the Chairman’s reply to a remark m my last report, relative to the dismissal of the mistress of languages, in which he informs me that the interview he had with me prior to the Board meeting, he regarded as semi-official. I dislike so much the position in which a semi-official interview places me, that 1 wish not to be placed in such a position again. I have, therefore, tendered the secretary my resignation.” The Waimea, the third ship from the Bluff with pats, is expected to be dispatched with eleven entries.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18801005.2.8

Bibliographic details

TELEGRAPHIC., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 161, 5 October 1880

Word Count
2,637

TELEGRAPHIC. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 161, 5 October 1880

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