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THE WIRE WORM.

To the Editor. Sir, —You will find enclosed something valuable to neither of us, but which may turn out very destructive to a paddock of spring wheat I have here. From what I hear it is supposed to be the wire-worm. The greater part of those found in the paddock are half embedded in the decaying part of the seed. They do not seem to have done harm to the plant or roots as yet. Would you kindly ask any of your farmer friends; who haye any certain knowledge of the appearance of the wire-

worm what is the best preventative, or cure, if any. I may mention they are a good deal larger when alive than those now sent you.—l am, &c., Duncan Cameron, Glumes, Methveu, 17th Sept., 1880. [The samples of the pest sent by Mr. Cameron are to be seen at our office. The worm is a small yellow wretch, about half an inch or less long, and about as thick as binding wire. We shall be glad to receive any reply to Mr. Cameron’s inquiry.— Ed., A.G.]

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18800923.2.6.2

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 156, 23 September 1880

Word Count
184

THE WIRE WORM. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 156, 23 September 1880

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