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Motto foe Conversationalists. “ There’s nothing like weather.” “No girl gets along wall without a mother,” says a moral contemporary. This may be true, but hereabouts girls work harder to get mothers-in-law than they do to get mothers. • Married couples resemble a pair of shears, so joined that they cannot be separated, often moving in opposite directions, vet always punishing anyone who comes between them, night. The Dean of Carlisle on Bradlaugh. —The Dean of Carlisle, preaching in the Carlisle Cathedral recently, said if the “fools’’who “said in their hearts there is no God ” said it only to their hearts, he did not wish to meddle with them. Let them seek their own way to perdition ; but if they spoke the same, wrote it, printed it, circulated it, religious liberty ceased to be liberty and the Christian religion could not tolerate it. He hoped the event which recently occurred might arouse the people to their danger. Infidelity was creeping in in a thousand ways, and God had permitted them to be startled with this hideous form of it in order to rouse them to a sense of their danger. Could a man who denied the Bible become a senator or make laws for a Christian people? He did trust there would arise there and elsewhere petitions to the House of Commons that it would not remove any of the barriers that now exist calculated to keep out an infidel — that it would not abolish another oath. As the Queen reigned by virtue of an oath, and the Constitution was built on it, and loyalty to the Queen grew cut of it, so their loyalty would be undermined and the throne shaken if they admitted into the councils of the nation a blaspheming nfidel. Holloway's Pills. —These Pills are more efficacious in strengthening a debilitated constitution than any other medicine in the world. Persons of a nervous habit of body, and all who are suffering from weak digestive organs, or whose health has become deranged by bilious affection, disordered stomach, or liver complaints, should lose no time in giving these admirable Pills a fair trial. Coughs, colds, asthma, or shortness of breath are also within the range of the sanative powers of this very remarkable medicine. The cures effected by these Pills are not superficial or temporary, but complete any permanent. 1 hey are as mild as they are efficacious, aud may he given with confidence to delicate females and young children. Their action on the liver, stomach, and bowels is immediate, beneficial, and lasting, restoring order and health in every case. — Advt)

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Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 147, 2 September 1880

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