Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Co-operation. —A Farmers’ Co-opera-tive Association has been formed at Timaru.

Agricultural and Pastoral Association. —The reading of Mr. Passmore’s paper on “Agricultural machinery” was postponed on Saturday to an evening to be afterwards fixed.

Parliament. —A large number of members of the Legislature came South with the Hawea on Sunday night—Mr. E. G. Wright, the member for Coleridge, among the number.

A Mutiny.— The men of the ship Pareora, lying at Timaru, have refused to to proceed to sea, contending that the vessel was below Plimsoll’s mark. The men will probably be tried for mutiny “on the high seas.”

The Halcione. —Shaw, Saville & Co’s, ship, the Halcione, arrived in Lyttelton on Sunday after a ninety-one days’ passage from London. She brings twenty-five passengers, amongst whom are an old Ashburton family—that of Mr. A. Pascoe.

The English Mails. —The inward mails, via San Francisco, arrived here from Christchurch on Sunday night by special train shortly before eleven o’clock. The Ashburton portion was at once sorted by the postal officials, and the special train proceeded south after a very short stoppage. Drunks. —A first offender was fined ss. yesterday, by the R. M., and a man named Nicolas was sent to dig post holes at the police station for a day, in expiation of an offence committed against the railway by-laws, having been drunk at the station. “Port Wine’’Annie—a terrible character —was sent six months to gaol with hard labor for vagrancy. “ William Pitt, the Eminent Statesman.” —This evening Mr. F. P. O’Reilly, barrister, will deliver a lecture in the Town Hall on “ William Pitt, the eminent statesman.” The lecture will take the place of one of the readings for the library and the proceeds will go to the library funds. We are glad the Library Committee have secured Mr. O’Reilly s services, especially as we know his powers as a speaker and his ability to make his subject interesting, and we can confidently say that those who attend on Tuesday night will listen to a lecture of no common order.

“ Cranmer and His Times.”—Notwithstanding the very disagreeable state of the weather last evening, the Town Hall was comfortably filled with an attentive and intelligent audience met together for the purpose of hearing a lecture from the Rev. D. M‘Kee, on “ Cranmer and his times.” It has often been deplored that lectures are very rarely well attended, or the efforts of lecturers appreciated, but the attendance at the hall last evening, and the frequent outbursts of applause, certainly ought to disabuse the minds of any who are sceptical as to the attractiveness of a lecture when the subject is popular and in the hands of an able man. The fame of the Rev. D. M‘Kee had certainly preceded his visit to Ashburton, but those who listened to him, both on Sunday and last evening, had to confess that “ half had not been told them.” The rev. lecturer handled his somewhat difficult subject with much skill, taking for his groundwork Macaulay’s, Froude’s, and Tennyson’s descriptions of the times in which Cranmer lived. The lecture, which bristled with wit and catting irony, took nearly two hours in its delivery. There was, however, not the slightest weariness manifested, but on the contrary, a feeling akin to a longing for a second edition. In concluding, the rev. lecturer gave the one-sided view that Macaulay took of Cranraer’s character as compared with the more lenient and impartial opinion of Froude, winding up with the confession of Cranmer, as given by the Poet Laureate. The choir of the Presbyterian Church added to the evening’s enjoyment by rendering several anthems, the harmonium being handled by Mr. Stott. Votes of thanks to the lecturer and the choir terminated the proceedings.

Sunday School Anniversary. —lt was announced in the Cameron street Church on Sunday, that the services in connection with the anniversary of the Wesleyan Sunday School would be conducted on the 19th September, by the Rev. Edward Best, of Dunedin. A tea meeting is to take place on the Monday following. Mr. Best has but recently arrived from Ireland, and is spoken of as a most eloquent and forcible speaker, and is very popular in Dunedin.

The Borough’s Subsidies. —Regarding the £ for £ subsidies that are looked upon as lost to the borough, it appears that there is some hope for at least a portion of them being recovered. If it can be proved that the rates were levied within six months of the time prescribed by the Act, it is probable that the Borough’s claim will bo recognised. The Financial Arrangements Act agreed to by the House yesterday will give the Borough at least 7s. 6d. in the £ on the assessment for the present year.

Mr. A. LeGrand Campbell. —The Nelson Colonist learns that Mr. A. LeGrand Campbell, R.M. and Warden at Collingwood, is to retire from his position on a pension, his judicial duties falling for discharge upon the Nelson Magistrate. Mr. LeGrand Campbell, .who was the R.M. at Ashburton just before Mr. Guinness, filled a multiplicity of small offices at Collingwood—such as Postmaster, Collector of Customs, Registrar, &c., and these are now to be discharged by a junior Clerk, who can be spared from Nelson. The newpolicyof retrenchment is the blast before which our late R.M. has had to succumb.

Pensions. —The colony pays in pensions L 21,262, which represents the interest on nearly a quarter of a million of the public debt.

One More. —Another old settler has died—Mr. Wm. Buick, of Wellington, seventy-three years of age. He came to the colony in 1841. Lockjaw. —Within a few years there have been five fatal cases of lockjaw in Dunedin. A correspondent to the Evening Star states that he cured a case by pouring into the mouth of the sufferer a small quantity of cayenne pepper in a wineglass of hot water, and then giving him an impromptu vapor bath.

The Unemployed. —Recently the contractors for the Tapanui railway (says the Otago Daily Times ) advertised for a number of men to fill gravel ballast into railway wagons at 7s. per day. They wanted 30 to 50 men in all, but only 15 accepted, employment. One man who applied at the office in Dunedin refused to work under Bs. 6d. A New Zealand Yacht for the Melbourne Regatta. —Mr. Thomas Niccol, of the North Shore, Auckland, is to be commissioned to build a yacht of between 30 and 40 tons, which will be entered for the first-class yacht race at Melbourne Regatta. A considerable amount of money has been subscribed to defray the cost of the vessel. A Ten Per Cent. Strike. - The quarrymen on the public works at Greymouth have struck against the ten per cent reduction, which was to affect their present month’s work. They contend that the reduction should not be retrospective, and their wages are 9s. or 10s. a day. This figure is considerably reduced on the average by broken time from bad weather.

The Late Mr. Ireland, M. H. R.— The late Mr. Ireland was an Irishman by birth, and a member of the Wesleyan denomination. The Tuapeka Times states that the deceased very rarely spoke about his relatives, but he has been known to say that he had a daughter in the Home country, and it is believed that he has a brother in business in Sydney. The name "Ireland” was a name he himself had adopted : his real name was Ren wick.

Not Rinderpest. —The stockowners of Tokomairiro have been a good deal exercised lately concerning a supposed case of rinderpest which is raid to have occurred there; It appears that the animal infected had previously made an effort to swallow a turnip, but partially failing in this a veterinary surgeon was called in, who pronounced the case one of rinderpest. The cow died, and stockowners in the vicinity are somewhat scared at the probability of rinderpest breaking out in the district, but there is consolation to be derived from the. hope that the disease may after all be one of “ turnip.” Color Blindness, Mr. Murray, M. H. R., seems to get hold cf very queer questions to ask Government, and if he is not a very brilliant statesman he is at least a painstaking one. He last week asked whether there was any provision made for examining the guards and signalmen on the railways for color blindness. The Minister for Public Works said an examination was made recently, which showed that veiy few men. were color blind, but the regulations of the department now provided for the men being examined. It would be an awkward thing for passengers were a signalman not to know the difference between one colored light and another.

The Colony’s Wrecks.— From the annual report of the Marine Department, we learn that during the nine months ending the 30th June reports have been received of. 48 casualties. Of these, 42 were on or near the coasts of the colony, 14, of 1979 tons, being total losses, 23, of 5,587 tons, partial losses, and 6 cases of loss of lives only. Seven lives were lost, viz., one each from the Augusta, Beautiful Star, Clematis, Elizabeth Firth, Sarah Pile, Shepherdess, and Stormbird. Of the five casualties reported as having occurred beyond the colony, one, of 80 tons, was a total loss ; three, amounting to 567 tons, were partial losses; and one was a case of loss of life only—a man having been washed overboard from the Rotomahana.

One for Sir “Samson.”— l “ JBgles ” in the Australasian says;—“My friend Ihe portrait painter has been engaged upon a memorial picture of one of the ablest administrators upon the roll of colonial governors. Now, Sir Samsoffis friends were desirous that the portrait should represent his Excellency in all the splendour of official uniform, and that was a settled preliminary. But, prior to the first sitting, said his Excellency—‘Now, Mr. F., you know I am attached to sport. Could not this be made something of a picture—horses running—the grand stand—a crowd of onlookers, &c. V ‘ Just so, your Excellency—capital idea. Of course I shall paint you from behind —looking out of a window.” There was no one more amused subsequently at his own proposal than Sir Samson. It is not difficult to fathom this story.

An Awkward Arrest. —On Friday night, in Auckland, Mr. Brown, a respectable ironmonger and ironworker, got orders to proceed to the barque Glimpse and make some repairs on the galley. The vessel was about to sail, and he set to work with two assistants at midnight. The captain, finding three men with their coats off, sent for a policeman. The constable arrived, and Brown and his companions endeavored to explain, but the captain positively refused to listen, and ordered the constable to take them into custody. The officer demurred, but finally yielded, and the the three men were handcuffed and marched up the wharf and lodged in police cells, a charge being entered against them under the Vagrancy Act. They were brought up at the Police Court on Saturday, when they were of course discharged, no evidence being offered against them. The captam of the Glimpse has since made a public apology to Mr. Brown and his workmen for having caused their false arrest and imprisonment while working on bis vessel.

“Bonnie Scotland.” —A three-year-old colt, “ Bonnie Scotland,” that was shown at Camara last year by Mr. George Warnock, has been sold by that gentleman to Mr. John Macfarlane, of Kaitangata, for 450 guineas.

Fatal.—“ You just take a bottle of my medicine,” said a quack doctor to a consumptiye, “and you’ll never cough again.”—“ Is it so fatal as that 1” gasped the consumptive. A Disagreeable Woman. —According to a paragraph in La France, Medicale a woman, whose name and address are published, has just given birth to eight children, perfecily formed. They were enclosed in a sac, and had apparently perished from mutual pressure during their growth. The mother is reported as “ doing well.”

Sentence of Death. —Charles Hanson has been sentenced to death in Melbourne for rape. In passing sentence the Judge said;—“Rape is not punished by death in England any longer, but in this country, for reasons excellent in themselves, as the country is at present advised, the punishment for rape is death. The protection of the honor and virtue of women is a matter of first importance. The}' are exposed to the solitude of life in the country where population is small, and where the temptations to many evil men are great. Ido not hold out to you any expectation that the sentence will not be carried out.”

Too Much Matrimony. —Thomas Dale, alias Jordan, ex-captain of the Canadian cricketers, owes his trouble to too much matrimony. He left a wife in England, when he went to America, but soon after he married a woman of Nalchez, Mias The English wife followed him across the ocean, and had him arrested for bigamy ; but she consented, for pay, to bis getting a divorce from her and marrying the Natchez wife over again. She assured him also she had obtained a promise from Sir Garnet Wolseley that he could visit England without danger of punishment for desertion. This representation seems to have been false. A Short Sermon. —Those who admire brief sermons will perhaps thinks the following one by a quiet Quakeress worthy of approbation:—“Dear friends, there are three things which I very much wonder at. The first is that children should be so foolish as to throw si ones, clubs, bricks, and sticks up into fruit trees to knock down fruit ; if they would let it alone it would fall itself. The second is that men should be so foolish as to go to and kill each other; if let alone they would die themselves. And the third and last thing that I wonder at is that young men should be so foolish as togo after the young women ; if they would stay at home, the young women would come after them.

A Tout at Jerome Park. —Last Saturday, says a recent number of the Turf, Field, and Farm, at the Jei’ome Park races, a green-looking individual scooped in 200. dola on Luke Blackburn in the first race. Shortly before the race for the Westchester Cup he was seen looking at the quotations of a prominent bookmaker, and appeared undecided about betting. The aforesaid bookmaker called a tout, and pointing out the green-looking individual, said :—“ You see that man ; go tell him to back Uncas ; that he is a sure winner, and I will give you 25 per cent of what he bets.” The green-looking individual, being advised, stepped up and bet the bookmaker 100 dels, to 600 dels, that Uncas would win. The result is known. Barbee landed Uncas a winner, and the bookmaker was beaten at his own game.

The Governor-General or India.— Lord Ripon (says the Home News) fancies himself a Roman Catholic ; as a matter of fact he is an English Puritan, believing very strongly in certain truths of revealed religion, and thinking that he can only live up to his ideal of faith by strict submission to the laws of the old doctrinal code of Christendom. Possibly he was not altogether aware of the full force of his words when he said that in turning Papist he had become more sincerely liberal than before. It was perfectly true, and meant this—that he had become more profoundly penetrated with the conviction that there is a Divine ruler of the universe, and that an unflinching allegiance is due to Him if we would accomplish anything good or great in this world. So, when he received new spiritual comfort, the poetry of the political creed in which he had been brought up naturally struck his imagination more vividly than ever.

The Fenian Outrage at Cork. —Telegrams to the Sydney papers say that great excitement has been caused by a most daring and impudent outrage committed by a band of Fenians in Cork harbor. Particulars to hand show that a number of persons in boats stealthily boarded the ship Juno, then lying in Cork harbor, surprised the officers and crew, and secured everyone on board, including some Customs officers, before any effectual resistance could be offered The gang then proceeded to search the ship, and took thirty seven rifles, making off with their plunder. After landing they cut the telegraph wires, but information of the outrage soon reached the police authorities, who took prompt steps towards apprehending the offenders. Up to the present time (August 17)) six of the gang have been captured. Further particulars show that the depredators weio Fenians engaged in 'the work of obtaining arms for secret organisations, in anticipation of a rising. It is understood that this sadden and unexpected outbreak has been stimulated by the intense feeling aroused' by the rejection of the Irish Tenancy Compensation Bill. The authorities have taken measures to suppress any further aggressive acts on the part of the malcontents. The event has caused the most intense surprise throughout the United Kingdom. The “Hand” of the Kavanaghs.— A few days ago the Morning Herald published the following relative to the wellknown Mr. Kavanagh of Borris. “ His family is a very old one, as the name MacMurrogh indicates, and there is a a curious legend in connection with it associated with Mr. Kavanagh’s infirmities. It was said many years ago that the Borris estates would pass into the hands of a ‘ monster,’ and that the event would happen within twelve months’ of the finding of a human hand. Mr. Kavanagh was the third son, and though his high mental qualities and his gentlemanly manners hardly justified the description of ‘monster,’ his singular deformities led many to wonder, when he was a young man, whether the legend in any way applied to him. When his eldest brother was twenty years of age the finding of a bundle of twigs which looked very like a human hand strengthened the suspicion that the legend would be realised. Within twelve months the elder brother died suddenly; throe months afterwards the second son died of fever ; and on coming of age the present Mr. Kavanagh inherited the estates.” Referring to the above, the Neiv Zealand Tablet writes —“ We can vouch for it that the hand that was found growing upon a tree that stood on some portion of the Borris property could not properly be described as a mere “ bundle of twigs.” It was a wooden hand, almost as perfect as if it had been carved, and showing both the nails and the knuckles of the fingers. It was exhibited for a week or two at the Dublin Exhibition of ’53, but was taken awaj' suddenly, as it was believed, at the indignant remonstrance of the Kavanagh family. The case that contained it stood in one of the galleries close by Cm beehives, which attracted so much attention. Some of our readers may, perhaps, remepiber the circumstance wo mention. ”

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18800831.2.4

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 146, 31 August 1880

Word Count
3,169

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 146, 31 August 1880

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working